KTEP - El Paso, Texas

El Paso Symphony Orchestra Broadcast

Thursday evening at 8pm, join KTEP for the next concert in the 2017-2018 El Paso Symphony Orchestra broadcast season. This week Music Director and Conductor Bohuslav Rattay, welcomes the UTEP Concert Chorale to the stage for a concert performed on February 23 and 24, 2018 at the Plaza Theatre.

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-ORIGINALLY AIRED JANUARY 7, 2018-

While host Keith Pannell was on the road, he visited with Dr. Duane Gill, Professor and Head of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. His areas of specialization include disasters and contaminated communities. Dr. Gill has conducted research understand social and psychological impacts of the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Alaska and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in coastal Alabama. Dr. Gill was part of a research team employed by the Gitga’at First Nation in British Columbia to assess potential impacts of an oil spill associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project. He discusses his recent studies on natural disasters and the impacts communities can face in terms of social impact.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED DECEMBER 24, 2017-

On this special edition of Words on a Wire, Daniel Chacón has the privilege of having multiple talented poets all together in our studio. He speaks with Cynthia Guardado, Lauren Espinoza, and María Teresa López Avedoy the winner and finalists of the Pellicer-Frost Binational Poetry Prize. Poets from the US and Mexico competed and the winners were invited to Juarez and El Paso for a reading and a ceremony to honor their accomplishment.

We've heard of football coaches, soccer coaches, and other coaches. But what about life coaches? This week we visited with El Paso's Life Coach, Michelle Blumenfeld. She explained what it takes to be a life coach, and who could benefit from one.

Artist Gabriel Gaytan is adding a new mural to Chicano Park, which is host to a collection of several murals painted on the columns of I-10 underneath the Spaghetti Bowl.

He will unveil his latest mural “The Wirikuta Tree of Life” on Sunday August 12, 2018.

The Plaza Classic Film Festival is officially underway and with it comes special guests, films, music and art. Its footprint and programming extend far beyond the walls of the Plaza Theater. It includes outdoor movies and concerts on Oregon Street next to San Jacinto Plaza, exhibitions and programs at the El Paso Museum of Art, the El Paso Museum of History, the El Paso Public Library, what we call Drive-in/Walk-up movies nine stories up atop the Mills Plaza Parking Garage and, new in 2018, an art exhibition at the Roderick Artpsace Lofts.

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A 29-year-old man stole a plane with no one else on board from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport late Friday before crashing on a nearby island, authorities said.

The man was a resident of Pierce County, Wash., and "acted alone," the Pierce County Sheriff's Department tweeted.

He told authorities on the ground he "would like to apologize" to people who cared about him. "I'm a broken guy who had a few screws loose. Didn't really know it until now," the man said, according to audio from air traffic controllers.

At 42, Dewayne Johnson developed a bad rash that was eventually diagnosed as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Four years later Johnson — now near death, according to his doctors — has been awarded a staggering sum of $289 million dollars in damages in a case against agricultural giant Monsanto.

The former school groundskeeper sued the company, arguing that an herbicide in the weed killer Roundup, likely caused the disease. His lawyers also contended Monsanto failed to warn consumers about the alleged risk from their product.

Debbie Dobrosky noticed a peculiar hue in the sky on August 6 — "a very ugly yellow casting" — as she peeked outside. A large cloud of smoke had begun to cover the sun.

By the next day, the smoke was so heavy that "even inside my apartment I've had to use my inhaler twice this morning, which is not a normal thing," says Dobrosky, a Riverside County, Calif., resident who lives about 30 miles from a fast-growing fire in the Cleveland National Forest.

The Trump administration has come up with a framework for reuniting families whose children are still in government custody. Some of their parents have been released into the U.S. and others are now in other countries.

In documents filed Thursday, government officials told U.S. District Court Judge Dana Sabraw that 559 children between the ages of 5 and 17 have yet to be reunited with their families. Of those, 365 have parents who were deported, and officials have contact information for all but five.

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"Hearing it changed everything for me," former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman told NPR on Friday.

Manigault Newman was referring to what she calls the "N-word tape" — a long-rumored but never surfaced tape of Donald Trump on the set of The Apprentice allegedly using the racial slur. In her interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Manigault Newman claims to have heard the tape and heard Trump using that slur on the tape.

But that's not what it says in her tell-all book, Unhinged, due out on Tuesday.

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Friday News Roundup - International

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The United States re-imposed sanctions on Iran this week, after pulling out of the Iran nuclear deal earlier this year. Renegotiating the deal was a key campaign promise for President Trump, but tension between the two countries has escalated.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

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This week, primaries and special elections in five states set the tone as midterms inch closer.

On Tuesday, voters in Ohio, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington had their say — and the results were mixed.

Here’s a take from The Washington Post on the winners and losers.

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NPR Business News

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All companies start out as private enterprises. That means there are only a handful of shareholders in the firm, and sometimes just one. But at some point, the company's owners might decide to 'go public', and put their shares up for sale on a public exchange for anyone to buy.

President Trump boasts that his trade policies are bringing back the steel industry, but recent corporate earnings reports make clear that they're also hurting the bottom line at many manufacturing companies.

"We're putting our steel workers back to work at clips that nobody would believe, right?" Trump asked the crowd at an Aug. 1 rally in Pennsylvania.

Major American steelmakers have reported higher-than-expected revenue in the second-quarter, thanks in part to Trump's 25 percent tariffs on imported steel.

President Trump ordered a doubling of U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Turkey Friday, escalating a diplomatic spat with a key NATO ally.

In a tweet, Trump cited the decline in Turkish currency as justification for increasing tariffs to 50 percent on Turkish steel and 20 percent on Turkish aluminum.

"Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!" Trump tweeted.

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Every day, Venezuela's currency, the bolivar, loses value, so people there are trying to trade it for U.S. dollars. Turns out, that's a really dangerous thing to do. Here's Sarah Gonzalez with our Planet Money podcast.

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Ling Ma was in the last months of a tedious office job when she began writing her first novel. The company was downsizing, and as her coworkers got laid off, the office became "silent and desolate," Ma recalls.

Eventually Ma lost her job, too. The first few weeks were liberating — she called her unemployment check her "arts fellowship" — and she turned her attention to her debut novel.

To tell how the nation's first black beer festival came to be held in Pittsburgh, you might start with a beer.

Maybe it was that introductory Sam Adams Boston Lager that longtime Michelob and Heineken guy Mike Potter drank more than a decade ago. "It had a completely different profile, a completely different taste, you know, completely different aroma," he says. "It just elevated my curiosity."

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Spike Lee's new movie, BlackkKlansman, is based on a true story, but the plot sounds crazy enough that you'd be excused for thinking he'd just made it up. It's about an African-American police officer, Ron Stallworth, who went undercover in the 1970s to infiltrate the Ku Klux Klan ... by joining it.

Stallworth was the first black officer hired by the Colorado Springs Police Department. In the film, when his chief and the mayor tell him they're hoping he'll "open things up," they don't anticipate that he'll go about that task in quite the way he chooses to do so.

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What To Do In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Sep 8, 2012

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Now to an odd potential problem here.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE WALKING DEAD")

SIMON: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging all Americans to...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Prepare for the zombie apocalypse.

Inside Security Council Talks On Syria

Sep 8, 2012

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Some Ga. Schools Make Mandarin Mandatory

Sep 8, 2012

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

Stephen Tobolowsky calls his book, The Dangerous Animals Club, a group of "pieces." They are partly essays, partly short stories, partly memoir. They are anecdotes, stories and insights that are shuffled in and out of order, like cards in a deck.

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