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STATE OF THE ARTS: Chalk the Block

It’s almost time for Chalk the Block , the largest public arts festival in the southwest. The event is free and will feature over 200 artists. This year, special installations include Impulse, a publicly activated light and sound experience; Intrude, a large installation of blow up animals; Paradox Pyramid, an interactive abstract pyramid installation and much more.

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This week, Words on a Wire host Tim Hernandez visits with poet Heather Dobbins to talk about her new collection, River Mouth.

The El Paso International Music Foundation was formed to is to empower El Paso/Juarez/Las Cruces musicians and promote the local music scene. They do this through education, advocacy and building awareness. 

It’s almost time for Chalk the Block, the largest public arts festival in the southwest. The event is free and will feature over 200 artists.

This year, special installations include  Impulse, a publicly activated light and sound experience; Intrude, a large installation of blow up animals; Paradox Pyramid, an interactive abstract pyramid installation and much more. 

On this edition of Good to Grow, hosts Denise Rodriguez, John  White, and Jan Petrzelka discuss growing herbs in the fall in the desert southwest.

Charles Horak speaks with Austin Young and Carlos De La Torre of Tower Productions.  Tower Productions are working to build a library of short films from a variety of filmmakers in the southwest region.

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The remains of Matthew Shepard, whose death became an important symbol in the fight against homophobia — and whose name is on a key U.S. hate-crime law — will be interred at Washington National Cathedral later this month.

Shepard's parents say they're "proud and relieved to have a final resting place for Matthew's ashes."

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Press secretary Sarah Sanders last walked up to the lectern in the White House press briefing room on Oct. 3 after a 23-day drought. Before that, there had been an 18-day stretch with no briefing.

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OK, let's go back to that moment when two women confronted Senator Jeff Flake in an elevator on Capitol Hill about the sexual assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a message for Republican voters who are celebrating the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh: Get to the polls in November if you want more conservatives sitting on judicial benches.

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Ensuring that people with pre-existing health conditions can get and keep health insurance is the most popular part of the Affordable Care Act. It has also become a flashpoint in this fall's midterm campaigns across the country.

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House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi vowed this week to demand President Trump's tax returns if Democrats win control of the House of Representatives next month.

Pelosi, seeking to regain her gavel as House speaker after elections in November, told The San Francisco Chronicle editorial board that the move "is one of the first things we'd do — that's the easiest thing in the world. That's nothing."

After the huge sell-off Wednesday, U.S. stocks fell sharply again Thursday. At one point, the Dow was down nearly 700 points. By late afternoon, it had regained some ground but closed down 546 points or a little more than 2 percent.

Over the past two days, the Dow has lost 1,378 points. The S&P 500 was down 2 percent for the day. The Nasdaq lost 1.25 percent.

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This morning, residents in Florida's Panhandle are waking up to a view of the devastation that was left behind by Hurricane Michael.

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Dave Huhn is a sheriff's deputy for Montezuma County, Colo., a stretch of sagebrush mesas and sandstone cliffs bordering Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, home to Mesa Verde National Park, where ancestral Puebloans' cliff dwellings still stand.

Huhn specializes in the complex world of water law. His job has become more important in this region after a series of hot, dry summers have made farmers more desperate for water, and more willing to steal it or go to battle over it.

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Lisa Spinelli loves small children — their innocence, their enthusiasm, above all their promise. But The Kindergarten Teacher's protagonist, achingly played by Maggie Gyllenhaal, knows that most 5-year-olds don't grow up to be particularly creative or even interesting. Exhibit A: herself.

The second Civil War will be fought over Thanksgiving. That's the devilish concept at the heart of The Oath, the new dark comedy from Ike Barinholtz that imagines families tearing at each other's throats over the latest machinations of the U.S. government. It doesn't have to imagine too hard. Written and filmed in a white-hot rage over the last year, The Oath barely bothers to mask the inspiration for its dystopia.

What if you were trapped in the middle of a traditional addiction narrative forever?

In a traditional fictional addiction narrative, the addict begins the story able to coexist with the addiction, if indeed it even has emerged. The addiction deepens, loved ones discover it and there is a single lowest point. Then there is a surrender by the addict and a willingness to get help. Or, sometimes, there is not, or there is another fall and then there is death.

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[Monkey See will be at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) through the middle of next week. We'll be bringing you our takes on films both large and small, from people both well-known and not.]

I'll say this: The Sessions is probably the most lighthearted movie about sex and polio you'll see this year.

Now that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is in charge of raising really big dollars for a superPAC that supports President Obama, wealthy Democrats all over the country may be eyeing their phones nervously.

Emanuel, the former Obama White House chief of staff, is known for not taking no for an answer and for aggressively going after what he wants.

Indeed, he's a ferocious fundraiser who gets to the point, often throwing in an epithet or two for emphasis, just the sort of rainmaker needed by Priorities USA Action, the pro-Obama superPAC that desperately needs cash.

Do you remember the case of the Central Park jogger, from 1989? Do you know who was convicted, what the evidence was, what supposedly happened? Do you know how long they served, or whether and when they were released? Do you know what eventually became of their convictions?

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

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