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THE WEEKEND: Literarity Book Shop

On this edition of The Weekend, host Louie Saenz visits with Bill Clark, owner of the Literarity Book Shop in El Paso.

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Host Daniel Chacon speaks with poet and translator, Arturo Mantecon about his recent work titled Poetry Comes Out Of My Mouth.

On this edition of The Weekend, host Louie Saenz visits with Bill Clark, owner of the Literarity Book Shop in El Paso.

El Paso’s Caldo Collective returns with a matching scholarship fund event and multi-dimensional pop-up exhibition at the Substation on November 17.   The Caldo Collective is calling on the community to come together to raise funds during the Frijol Feasts Community Scholarship Dinner. 

The Film Salon is an ongoing monthly film series created by Charles Horak that is devoted to the screening and appreciation of classic and important works of the cinema. Its goal is to expose audiences to films, foster discussions, build a community of cinephiles and enhance our understanding of our moving image heritage.  

Denise Rodriguez & Jan Petrzelka discuss tree planting, and pruning in the fall months.

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Progressive superstars like Beto O'Rourke, Andrew Gillum, and Stacey Abrams all either lost or are trailing extremely close races in Texas, Georgia, and Florida. But Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders insists Democrats' takeover of the House of Representatives and other key wins are a vindication of the progressive posture he's long advocated for.

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NPR Business News

Tesla has named a new chair to replace Elon Musk, after the CEO agreed to step down from the company's board as part of a settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Musk's successor as chair, effective immediately, will be Robyn Denholm, a Tesla board member and technology executive.

It all started with an Aug. 7 tweet. In it, Musk said he was considering taking Tesla private at $420 a share — and had funding secured.

The SEC accused him of manipulating the market and sued him in late September for making "false and misleading" statements to investors.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

How long do you spend on hold? What kind of discounts do you get? These things could be determined by something called a Customer Lifetime Value score. This score is being used by companies across the economy and the results of those scores can be powerful.

Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

Jane Polston and I are walking over to some greenhouses at the University of Florida, where she's a professor. She wants to show me how viruses infect plants, which has been the focus of her professional life ever since she first learned about plant viruses, back in college.

"I just fell in love," she says.

"With viruses?" I ask.

"Yeah. Isn't that weird? That's what scientists do. They say, 'Oh, my God, I'm in love with this!' "

We love our listeners, and we especially love getting your questions. So today on the show, we answer a few of them — about luxury real estate markets, money and wealth, and our favorite ways to learn about economics and markets.

And as promised on the show, we reference these three articles:

-- Visual Capitalist

-- The Credit Suisse Wealth report

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NPR Arts News

Virtue is often associated with beauty, and evil with ugliness. But in Argentina in the 1970s, there was a teen serial killer so strikingly becoming he was known as El Angel — the Angel of Death.

As did its predecessors, The Girl in the Spider's Web shrieks its loathing of men who hurt women. It also wails over the threatened innocence of children, emits a primal scream at sexual trauma, and howls its disgust at the endemic corruption that renders gangsters and bureaucrats essentially identical.

But the message the movie yells most loudly is, "Reboot!"

William Wallace is dead. His head has been kebob'd on a pike as fly food, and his limbs have been scattered throughout Scotland to serve as a warning to any other would-be rebels thinking of spiting the British throne. This is Year 1304, lords and ladies. No messing around. Whatever you might know about Scotland's most famous revolutionary, perhaps gleaned from a certain 1995 historical action epic as inescapable as a wee chill on a fall Highlands day, know ye this: Netflix's expensive new war film Outlaw King is not telling THAT guy's story.

This 'Unholy Land' May Not Even Be Real

10 hours ago

How sure are you that the world you see around you every day is real?

How sure are you that it's the only one? That there aren't other, stranger, worse or better worlds existing simultaneously, right next door, a breath away?

How sure are you that you're not living in one of them right now?

Over many thousands of years, our understanding of the world has advanced exponentially. But our sense of mystery remains, and we still seek assurances that science and reason cannot provide.

Elaine Pagels opens her new book with the question, "Why is religion still around in the twenty-first century?" As a distinguished scholar of Christianity, she obviously knows some academic explanations, but in Why Religion? A Personal Story she suggests a simpler, more poignant answer: It's because we suffer and need help.

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Best YA Fiction Poll: You Asked, We Answer!

Jul 24, 2012

Our Best YA Fiction poll has only been live for a few hours, and already the cries of outrage are echoing through the intertubes! Where are A Wrinkle in Time, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and Ender's Game? What about Watership Down? My Side of the Mountain? Where the Red Fern Grows? Most of Judy Blume's oeuvre? The Little House books?

We hear you, I promise.

There's a fine line between satire and the nasty snigger that marks so much of pop comedy these days — which is another way of saying that the corrosively funny takedown of child beauty pageants in the 2006 movie Little Miss Sunshine moved me to forgive (by a hair) its creepiest creation — Alan Arkin's heroin-addicted grandpa. Still, I wonder whether my 14-year-old, who has roared her way through that movie at least a dozen times, can tell the difference between sharp commentary and the juvie desire to shock.

The obvious way to approach South Korean director Seung-jun Yi's modest but potent documentary Planet of Snail is to think of it as a story about a disabled man making his way through the world with the help of his companion. But more simply and more accurately, it's really a movie about marriage — about the way two people can smooth over each other's cracks to achieve an imperfect yet sturdy wholeness.

The Colorful Days Of Life On The Border

Jul 24, 2012

Editor's note: This is another one of those stories that came to me fortuitously by email. Bruce Berman teaches photography in Las Cruces, N.M., and, like many photography instructors, he has a huge archive of his own. This is just a small selection of his color photographs documenting life in the border town of El Paso, Texas.

In The Twilight War, government historian David Crist outlines the secret history of America's 30-year conflict with Iran. The book, based on interviews with hundreds of officials as well as classified military archives, details how the covert war has spanned five American presidential terms and repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare.

Crist tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that there have been several incidents that have almost resulted in battle over the past 30 years.

For bartenders, the words "last call" have a hidden meaning: It won't be long before they're enjoying a drink of their own. And after hours of making tonics, flips and fizzes, what does a bartender drink? Often, the answer is short and simple: Fernet.

In a world of citrusy, sugary drinks that can all taste alike, Fernet Branca stands alone. Depending on how your palate responds, the Italian digestif can be called everything from refreshingly bold to an acquired taste to cough syrup that's gone bad.

Experimental fiction in North America began with a genius of a doyen in Paris: Gertrude Stein, whose aesthetic assertion that writers shape and form and reform the medium of language the way sculptors work with stone, painters work with light and shape and composers work with sound, changed Hemingway forever and, thus, changed the nature of the American short story — or the American art story, at least.

Last month we asked you, our audience, to nominate titles for a top-100 list of the best young adult — YA — fiction ever written. Thousands of you sent in nominations. We've tabulated those suggestions and, with the help of an expert panel, narrowed the list to the 235 finalists you see below.

When William Bolcom's opera A View from the Bridge premiered in Chicago in 1999, one critic described it as "Brooklyn verismo," invoking the emotive style popularized by Italian composers such as Puccini. And that pretty much hits the nail on the head.

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