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SCIENCE STUDIO: Lane Martin

Lane Martin is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Martin's work focuses on developing materials that will change the way we live. In particular, he works on the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of advanced functional electronic materials. Ultimately his research is aimed at enabling dream applications in areas ranging from new modes of computation, memory and data storage, energy conversion, sensing and transduction, actuation, and much more.

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The mission of the Trost Society is to promote the legacy of Trost & Trost, one of the most iconic architectural firms of the American Southwest, and to educate the public about the architectural heritage of our region and the benefits of historic preservation.

Their Fall 2018 Rebuilding Trost event takes place on September 27, 2018 and will feature Paul Foster as keynote speaker. The event will be hosted in the atrium of the beautifully restored White House Department Store – now known as the Center Building. 

Shakespeare on-the-Rocks will celebrate its 30th season in the theater at the Chamizal National Memorial. The Festival opens with a new production of Macbeth followed by The Comedy of Errors and of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Lane Martin is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Martin's work focuses on developing materials that will change the way we live. In particular, he works on the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of advanced functional electronic materials. Ultimately his research is aimed at enabling dream applications in areas ranging from new modes of computation, memory and data storage, energy conversion, sensing and transduction, actuation, and much more.

Stephanie Elizondo Griest is the author of the award-winning memoirs including Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana, and Mexican Enough: My Life Between the Borderlines. This week, we spoke with her on her most recent book, All the Agents and Saints - Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands, in which Elizondo Griest weaves seven years of stories into a meditation on the existential impact of international borderlines by illuminating the spaces in between.

UTEP Department of Theatre and Dance is opening their 2018-2019 season with a stage production of Rudolfo Anaya’s acclaimed Chicano novel Bless Me, Ultima.

This enchanting tale follows young Antonio Márez as he finds his way through a world filled with vaqueros, witches and corridos. With the guidance and protection of the curandera Ultima, Antonio finds his roots in the traditions of the llano and spreads his wings. 

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Meet Nevada's 'Trump Of Pahrump'

13 minutes ago

Dennis Hof sits on a red and black velvet couch under TV screens that flash pictures of scantily clad women. Behind him, the doorbell is ringing and women in lingerie line up. Men walk in, select one of the women, sit with them at the bar and eventually head down a long hallway into bedrooms.

"We call it a meet and greet. So a customer comes up and the bell goes off and we let the girls know there's a new client in the house come out and meet him," he says, sipping on iced coffee and explaining the ways of his brothel.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Next week marks a grim anniversary for Las Vegas. The single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. A man opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino into crowds at a country music festival on Oct. 1, 2017. He killed 58 people, injured hundreds more and left this city reeling.

A year on the city is still healing. We spoke to two survivors.

'I hid under someone who was dead'

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Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assaulting her in high school, has agreed to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, her attorneys said Saturday.

Bipartisan negotiators have tentatively agreed to work toward a Thursday hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee with Kavanaugh and Ford, but talks continue on a final agreement, according to multiple congressional sources.

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Philadelphia-based Comcast outbid 21st Century Fox on Saturday to take control of British broadcaster Sky for about $39 billion.

The U.S. cable giant came out on top in a three-round auction held by British regulators by offering about $2 more per share.

Both Comcast and Fox wanted Sky to compete with online streaming services Netflix and Amazon.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Walmart Inc. on Friday, alleging the company has unlawfully discriminated against pregnant workers for years at one of its warehouse locations in Wisconsin.

The complaint, filed in federal court on behalf of Alyssa Gilliam, claims Walmart failed to accommodate workers' pregnancy-related medical restrictions, even though job modifications were provided to non-pregnant employees with physical disabilities. It also says the company denied pregnant workers' requests for unpaid leave.

China has warned the U.S. to withdraw sanctions on its military or face consequences. The U.S. imposed the sanctions on Thursday over China's purchase of Russian fighter jets and surface-to-air missile equipment.

Rent!

Sep 21, 2018

Ever since the end of the financial crisis, rents have been rising all across America. A recent report from Zillow put the median monthly accommodation rental payment in the U.S. at $1440.

The good news is, that it is the same as last year. After years of rising, rents are finally leveling off. Susan Wachter of the Wharton school talks with Stacey and Cardiff about what that means for renters and for the entire U.S. economy.

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During World War II, the British were worried about their own countrymen with Nazi sympathies.

That's the historical basis for Kate Atkinson's new novel, Transcription. It follows a character named Juliet Armstrong, who was recruited to the British Secret Service as a teenager to help monitor fascist sympathizers in 1940.

New Book: Vaccines Have Always Had Haters

1 hour ago

Vaccinations have saved millions, maybe billions, of lives, says Michael Kinch, associate vice chancellor and director of the Center for Research Innovation in Business at Washington University in St. Louis. Those routine shots every child is expected to get can fill parents with hope that they're protecting their children from serious diseases.

But vaccines also inspire fear that something could go terribly wrong. That's why Kinch's new book is aptly named: Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity.

As a Girl Raised In The South, I grew up knowing the legend of the infamous Unclaimed Baggage Center, the Alabama store that buys and sells lost airline bags. Back in the day, their major claim to fame was the acquisition of a Hoggle puppet from the production of Labyrinth — my favorite character in one of my favorite movies. I never managed to make a pilgrimage, but the title of this book definitely piqued my interest. And what a magnificent gem of a story I found.

When Katharine Briggs — a mother and homemaker — began what she called a "cosmic laboratory of baby training" in her Michigan living room in the early 1900s, she didn't know she was laying the groundwork for what would one day become a multi-million dollar industry. Briggs was just 14 years old when she went to college, and ended up graduating first in her class, explains author Merve Emre. She married the man who graduated just behind her at No. 2 — and while he became a scientist, she was expected to take care of the home.

The second season of Netflix's American Vandal dropped last Friday. The first season proved a slow-build, under-the-radar, word-of-mouth phenomenon; the second arrived to a devoted and vocal fanbase. Season one was something you started hearing about over the course of weeks and months, from disparate friends and family; full, spoilery reviews of season two were posted at 12:01:01 a.m. last Friday.

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Philadelphia-based Comcast outbid 21st Century Fox on Saturday to take control of British broadcaster Sky for about $39 billion.

The U.S. cable giant came out on top in a three-round auction held by British regulators by offering about $2 more per share.

Both Comcast and Fox wanted Sky to compete with online streaming services Netflix and Amazon.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 11:13 p.m. ET

Immigrants who benefit from various forms of public assistance, including food stamps and housing subsidies, would face sharp new hurdles to obtaining a green card under a proposed rule announced by the Trump administration on Saturday.

When Katharine Briggs — a mother and homemaker — began what she called a "cosmic laboratory of baby training" in her Michigan living room in the early 1900s, she didn't know she was laying the groundwork for what would one day become a multi-million dollar industry. Briggs was just 14 years old when she went to college, and ended up graduating first in her class, explains author Merve Emre. She married the man who graduated just behind her at No. 2 — and while he became a scientist, she was expected to take care of the home.

Copyright 2018 90.3 WCPN ideastream. To see more, visit 90.3 WCPN ideastream.

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Watching comedian Gilda Radner in the first years of "Saturday Night Live" was to watch a master shapeshifter who happened to be sidesplittingly funny.

(SOUNDBITE OF "SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE" MONTAGE)

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