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On Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush was visiting Sarasota, Fla. At 8 a.m. sharp, the CIA's Michael Morell delivered the daily intelligence briefing — something he did six mornings a week — regardless of whether the president was at the White House or on the road.

"Contrary to press reporting and myth, there was absolutely nothing in my briefing that had to do with terrorism that day," Morell recalled. "Most of it had to do with the Israeli-Palestinian issue."

In a new bid to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, two Native American communities are suing the Trump administration, saying it failed to adhere to historical treaty boundaries and circumvented environmental impact analysis. As a result, they are asking a federal judge in Montana to rescind the 2017 permit and block any further construction or use of the controversial pipeline.

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We're going to hear now from Cynthia Nixon. She hopes to add her name to the list of progressive upsets we've seen this primary season. As we said, she's been making an insurgent bid to unseat two-term incumbent Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo.

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Updated Sept. 18

Thanks to Tropical Storm Florence, Eastern coastal residents continue to experience widespread flooding, closed roads and large-scale displacement.

NPR and our member stations covering the storm want to hear how it is affecting you.

Fill out the form below or at this link and someone may follow up. Your response may be used on air or online.

(For the latest news on the storm, visit npr.org).

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Santa Rosa Beach, in Florida's Walton County, is a quiet place with sugar-white sand, a pleasant surf and signs warning visitors to stay out. The largely rural county on Florida's Panhandle is at the center of a battle over one of the state's most precious resources: its beaches. Most of the 26 miles of beaches are already privately owned. As of July 1, homeowners with beachfront property in Walton County can declare their beach private and off-limits to the public. The new law has sparked a standoff between wealthy homeowners and other local residents.

Updated at 10:56 p.m. ET

Dallas police arrested officer Amber Guyger on manslaughter charges Sunday, after she shot and killed a man in his apartment last week. Guyger has said she mistakenly believed she had entered her own home in the same building.

An affidavit for an arrest warrant says the officer found the door ajar at what she thought was her own apartment. It says it was dark inside, she saw the silhouette of a man, and she gave him orders that he didn't follow. She told investigators she thought the man was a burglar.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Hurricane Florence is growing in size and strength as it barrels toward the Southeastern U.S. for an expected landfall in the Carolinas later this week as an "extremely dangerous hurricane," according to the National Hurricane Center.

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A white Dallas police officer was arrested last night for fatally shooting a black man in his own apartment. She was arrested on manslaughter charges and later released on bond. Christopher Connelly from our member station KERA reports.

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Matt Arteaga, 51, is one of about 500 people who got sick this summer in an outbreak linked to McDonald's salads. The cause was a parasite, cyclospora.

Arteaga fell ill on a Thursday afternoon in June. He was in his office in Danville, Ill., when he says the symptoms came on quickly. "The chills, and body aches, severe cramping, sharp pain in my stomach," Arteaga recalls.

Seventeen years after it was destroyed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, New York City's Cortlandt Street subway station has at long last reopened.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the city's subway system, unveiled the reconstructed station on Saturday, just three days before the anniversary of the attack.

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On a cold January day more than a century ago, U.S. troops massacred nearly 200 Piikani people on a Montana river bank. Most were women, children and old folks.

"It's hard to imagine," Chief Stanley Charles Grier of the Piikani Nation in Alberta, Canada said.

Updated at 12:45 a.m. ET on Monday

A slew of dangerous storms – hurricanes, tropical storms and a typhoon — are on the move and threatening life and property in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

The National Hurricane Center has issued advisories for the Atlantic on Hurricane Florence, and two tropical storms, Helene and Isaac. The NHC has also issued an advisory for the Eastern Pacific on Tropical Storm Paul, and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center has issued advisories for Hurricane Olivia, which is moving quickly westward toward Hawaii.

Cities in California can no longer tack on exorbitant legal fees to settle minor local code violations, thanks to a new law enacted this week.

The law makes it illegal for cities and counties to charge defendants for the legal costs to investigate, prosecute or appeal a criminal violation of a local ordinance.

People from across the country gathered this weekend in a small Carolina manufacturing town to celebrate Bigfoot.

The first annual Bigfoot Festival in Marion, N.C. brought together the entire range of participants from sasquatch skeptics and complete nonbelievers to Bigfoot explorers quick to share tales of sightings and howls.

McDowell County Chamber of Commerce director Steve Bush is ambivalent when it comes to Bigfoot.

"I'm going to say that until I see him — I want to believe, but until I physically see him — I'm going to say no at this point," says Bush.

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Updated 12:34 p.m. ET, Sunday, Sept. 9

Naomi Osaka claimed her first Grand Slam title on Saturday after defeating Serena Williams 6-2, 6-4, in the final of the U.S. Open. With the victory, Osaka became the first Japanese woman to win a Grand Slam singles title.

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