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North Korea says it will deport a U.S. citizen who entered the country illegally from neighboring China last month — a move seen as a conciliatory gesture aimed at maintaining ties with Washington.

North Korea's official KCNA news agency identified the American as Bruce Byron Lowrance and said that he had told his captors that he was controlled by the CIA.

The last two surviving leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s were found guilty Friday by an international tribunal on charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

The conviction of Nuon Chea, 92, the chief lieutenant of the regime's infamous leader, Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, the former head of state, is the first official acknowledgement that at least some of the estimated 2 million people who died at the hands of the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979 were victims of an orchestrated genocide.

A plan to repatriate Rohingya refugees to Myanmar from neighboring Bangladesh has stalled, apparently because the refugees were unwilling to go.

Bangladesh has stressed that it will not repatriate anyone against their will. Still, the program sparked protests among some refugees, while others reportedly hid within refugee camps out of fear of being forced to go back.

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Our next story is about a pair of journalists covering the war in Syria together. One of them lived. One did not. This story is harrowing, graphic and haunting. Our colleague Mary Louise Kelly takes it from here.

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Updated at 1:22 p.m. ET

Already reeling from a string of protests and resignations, British Prime Minister Theresa May is fighting for more than the draft Brexit deal she has negotiated with the European Union. With a mutiny afoot within her own Conservative Party, the prime minister may be battling for her political life, as well.

Vice President Pence and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat next to each other and chatted briefly Thursday at the East Asia Summit in Singapore, in a conversation that also included national security adviser John Bolton.

Pence and Putin "discussed the upcoming G20 Summit and touched on the issues that will be discussed when President Trump and President Putin are both in Argentina for the summit," according to the vice president's press secretary, Alyssa Farah.

The G20 Summit will be held in Buenos Aires at the end of November.

If you hold your nose and take a sip of coffee, mostly what you'll taste is a bitter liquid. Much of the gustatory pleasure we take from coffee comes from its aroma.

But a new study suggests people's sensitivity to that bitter taste plays a role in how much coffee they drink. And though it seems counterintuitive, the study shows that the more sensitive you are to the bitter taste of coffee, the more of it you tend to drink.

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Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor is calling for the death penalty for five people accused of involvement in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, the journalist and critic of the royal regime who died last month at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The office of Prosecutor Saud al-Mojeb issued a statement saying that his office has indicted 11 suspects, adding that the prosecutor "has requested the death penalty for (5) individuals who are charged with ordering and committing the crime."

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Last year, the Chinese wife of a Pakistani man traveled back home to China with their two children. She wanted to introduce her younger boy, 18 months old, to her mom.

But after she landed in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang, she was detained, says her husband, a doctor named Rehman. His wife is a Uighur Muslim, a member of a minority group that has been targeted in a Chinese crackdown.

Security officials left their sons at their grandmother's house. Weeks later, they returned and took away the older boy, age 6.

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After a marathon meeting at 10 Downing Street, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May announced that her cabinet is backing a controversial withdrawal agreement with the European Union.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Two weeks ago, 10-year-old Sara was sitting up in her bed at a hospital in Hodeidah, Yemen.

Some of the other children in the ward had their moms or other family members by their side.

But Sara was all alone.

She was recovering from a rare bacterial infection, called diphtheria, which had paralyzed part of her body. A small hole sliced into her throat was helping her breathe.

Updated at 9:13 a.m. ET on Thursday

Hours after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a tentative deal charting the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union and assuring the public that her Cabinet supported it, two key ministers abruptly quit her government in protest over the proposed pact.

The first to call it quits was Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who said in a letter of resignation that he could not "in good conscience" support the draft deal. Not long after, Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey followed suit.

A Maryland auction house has sold a photo showing Nazi leader Adolf Hitler with his arm around a young girl of Jewish heritage for $11,520.

The young girl, named Rosa Bernile Nienau, was about 5 or 6 at the time. Known as Bernile, she had a Jewish grandmother but was apparently a favorite of the man who led Nazi Germany, which along with its collaborators murdered 6 million Jews during the Holocaust.

The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Wednesday to lift sanctions against Eritrea, rewarding the embattled East African nation for recent efforts to establish peaceful relations with its Horn of Africa neighbors.

The U.N. vote is the latest development in the thawing of tense relations between Eritrea its three neighbors to the south — Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia.

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Today Defense Secretary Jim Mattis meets a Philippine diplomat about a pair of church bells. Here's Wyoming Public Radio's Maggie Mullen.

It was the new Sri Lankan Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa's first day in parliament, alongside the lawmakers he was appointed to lead. But he got a less-than-welcoming reception.

Instead, parliament on Wednesday spared no time in passing a no-confidence motion against him, less than three weeks after he was sworn into the job.

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

Vice President Mike Pence had strong words for Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi at a regional summit being held in Singapore, calling out her country's brutal military campaign against minority Rohingya Muslims and the imprisonment of two prominent journalists.

Pence told Suu Kyi that he wanted to hear about progress in resolving the continued persecution of the Rohingya in the country's northern Rakhine state – an army-led crackdown that the United Nations has labeled ethnic cleansing.

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