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Updated at 8:57 p.m. ET

Millions of years before the brontosaurus roamed the Earth, a massive relative was lumbering around South Africa.

Scientists think this early Jurassic dinosaur was, at the time, the largest land creature ever to have lived. And unlike the even bigger creatures that came later, they think it could pop up on its hind legs.

The Dutch government is considering a proposal to ban the use of smartphones and other "mobile electronic devices" on bicycles.

Infrastructure Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen published the draft legislation on Thursday, NL Times reports. If approved, it could go into effect in the summer of 2019.

It is already illegal to use a phone while driving a motor vehicle in the Netherlands, the news site says. Offenders face a fine of more than $250.

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Maybe the short answer is: We need a better imagination?

The global health world hasn't set its goals high enough, hasn't dreamed big enough when it comes to stopping tuberculosis, says Dr. Paul Farmer, physician at Harvard Medical School and founder of the nonprofit Partners In Health.

"We've had a failure of imagination," he says. "We haven't had the same optimism, commitment and high ambitious goals around TB that we've seen around HIV. And what's the downside of setting high goals? I think it's very limited."

Earlier this month, British pianist James Rhodes received a notification from Facebook. A short video he had recorded and uploaded of himself playing a passage of Bach's Partita No. 1 had been flagged by Facebook's copyright identification system as belonging to Sony Music, resulting in 47 of the video's 71 seconds being muted.

"Stop being a**holes," Rhodes tweeted in response.

As dusk falls in Iraq's port city of Basra and searing heat of day cools to under 100 degrees, the public square across the street from the city's burned provincial government building starts to fill with protesters.

Young Iraqis have gathered almost every night for more than three months to protest faltering public services and lack of jobs in the city in the heart of Iraq's rich southern oil fields.

India's Supreme Court has struck down a colonial-era law that made adultery illegal, calling it arbitrary and saying it is unconstitutional because it "treats a husband as the master."

Section 497 of the Indian Penal Code makes it a crime for a man to have intercourse with another man's wife "without the consent or connivance of that man."

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Before the testimony of his Supreme Court nominee and before the testimony of his accuser, we have testimony, or strictly speaking, a press conference, from the president of the United States.

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A British-based investigative group says that one of two men charged with attempted murder in the nerve-agent poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter earlier this year is a highly decorated officer in Russia's military intelligence service.

Days after signing a landmark agreement with the government of China on the appointment of bishops, Pope Francis has written a letter reassuring the Chinese Catholic community of his support. The agreement, which was announced on Saturday, had sparked confusion and criticism of Francis, that he was selling out to the Chinese government.

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In his big address at the U.N. yesterday, world leaders assembled and listening, President Trump kicked off like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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On Tuesday evening the Duchess of Sussex provoked commentary on social media through doing something most of us do every day – closing her car door.

Meghan Markle was arriving at the Royal Academy of Arts to attend the opening of an art exhibit titled "Oceania" in her first solo outing as a royal, when she broke protocol through casually shutting her own car door.

"First time I've seen an on-duty princess shut her own car door," wrote one Twitter user.

"I really don't think it occurs to her that someone else is there to do that," wrote another.

Updated at 9:24 p.m. ET

During a rare press conference Wednesday, President Trump sent mixed messages about the fate of his embattled Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

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Beluga Charms British With Impromptu Visit

Sep 26, 2018

Dave Andrews couldn't believe what he was seeing. And then he couldn't believe what he was tweeting.

"Can't believe I'm writing this, no joke - BELUGA in the Thames off Coalhouse Fort," the Norfolk, England, resident posted on Twitter Tuesday.

The ecologist and ornithologist, as described on his Twitter account, had spotted a beluga whale swimming in the River Thames east of London, far from its normal habitat.

A beluga swimming in the Thames is undoubtedly rare, and a social media frenzy ensued.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Thursday

President Trump accused China of trying to interfere in upcoming U.S. midterm elections because of the hard line he has taken on trade, airing the claim as he opened Wednesday's meeting of the U.N. Security Council in New York.

On Wednesday, as part of the United Nation's annual General Assembly in New York, world leaders are convening for the first ever high-level meeting dedicated to fighting tuberculosis, and Nandita Venkatesan got the chance to share her story as a survivor in the opening session.

"It's humbling," Venkatesan says of her inclusion in the program. "Not long ago I was just a girl lying in bed with a hopeless future. I never thought I'd get out of bed, let alone fly to New York."

Aimé Mpane remembers when he first saw the old statues.

It was 1994, and the Congolese visual artist had just moved to Belgium, which once ruled his country. Growing up in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mpane says he had been taught in school that the Congolese were descended from the Gauls — "that they were our kings."

"In our schoolbooks, it was as if the Congolese did not exist without Belgian colonialists," says Mpane, 50. His work explores the memory of colonialism in Congo and Belgium. "I wanted to know what [the Belgians] knew about us."

Federal and state authorities in Mexico have disarmed the entire police force in the city of Acapulco as investigators look into suspicions that it has been infiltrated by drug gangs.

According to The Associated Press, officers "were stripped of their guns, radios and bullet-proof vests and taken for background checks. Law enforcement duties in the seaside city of 800,000 will be taken over by soldiers, marines and state police."

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A Chinese citizen was arrested Tuesday on charges that he helped China in an effort to recruit engineers and scientists at U.S. defense contractors for possible espionage.

In a 17-page criminal complaint dated Sept. 21, federal prosecutors charged Ji Chaoquan, 27, with one count of knowingly acting as the agent of a foreign power.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

The U.S. has issued a report condemning the violent crackdown on the Rohingya Muslims by the Myanmar military as "extreme, large-scale, widespread." But the report, issued by the State Department on Monday, notably did not label the mass killings a genocide.

That distinction is an important legal one governing how and whether the International Criminal Court may act in these cases.

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We turn now to Jens Stoltenberg. He's the secretary general of NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. And he was at the U.N. for President Trump's remarks. We asked him what he thought of the speech and Trump's "America First" approach.

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A report on clerical sexual abuse in Germany released Tuesday found thousands of cases of sexual abuse of minors by clerics in the Catholic Church between 1946 and 2014 — and warns that the actual number is surely higher.

The study looked at more than 38,000 sets of personnel records from the country's dioceses, as well as criminal records and interviews with those who say they were abused and clerics accused of abuse.

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