KTEP - El Paso, Texas

A Message From KTEP's General Manager

Sep 14, 2020

September 14 is an important day in our history.  It marks our 70th birthday!  KTEP was licensed on September 14, 1950.  On September 14, you will begin to hear promos asking for your pledges.  Throughout this pandemic and the past 70 years, KTEP has not faltered in making sure that the station remained on the air providing you with the information you have come to expect…the programs that make up a part of your day.  I invite you to go our website: ktep.org and visit our gift-giving page.  I am graciously asking that you come forward now and help make this pledge drive the most successful one in our history.

 

ON FILM - Sunhouse Arts' Work Project & the American Western Part 2

This week's episode of On Film continues the immense discussion of the American Western from last week. With a discussion of the waning prominence of the Western, a reforming of the Western into police procedurals during the 1970's, and the controversial historical revisionism of some films, there was a plethora of topics discussed with Sunhouse Arts' Celine Dipp.

Read More

Local News

CBP officers seize Mexican Bologna
U.S. Customs and Border Protection / CBP

EL PASO -- U.S. customs and Border Protection officers continue to seize large loads of drugs on the Texas-Mexico border.  Smuggling during the pandemic also includes a comfort food that is contraband Mexican bologna. 

Miriam Ortiz, a loyal shopper at La Mejor Texas Meat shop understands the popularity of the lunchmeat. She was at the meat market buying dinner for her family including steaks and some short ribs.  

EL PASO -- A class-action lawsuit aims to end the Trump administration's expulsion of migrant children who arrive at the border alone seeking refuge. Many of the kids have been held in hotels in Texas border cities including El Paso and McAllen before being removed from the country.

 

The ACLU is spearheading the lawsuit filed in Washington D.C.  along with the Texas Civil Rights Project and Oxfam America seeking to block border officials from suspending legal safeguards for children who arrive at the border alone.

 

William Englisbee holds a photo of his mother Angelina Maria Silva de Englisbee
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

 

EL PASO -- William Englisbee embodies the quiet strength of the city he calls home. 

 

“Every day’s a struggle,” said Englisbee at Evergreen Cemetery east recently where he was paying respects to his mother. Angelina Maria Silva de Englisbee was among 23 people gunned down at an El Paso Walmart a year ago.  She was 86.

 

Walmart survivors meet at park
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

EL PASO --It’s been nearly a year since the August 3rd mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart, the deadliest attack targeting Latinos in modern U.S. history.  Alongside the horror of what happened that day, there were moments of heroism -- Shoppers risking their livesto help others escape from the gunman.  

On a sweltering summer day recently, Eduardo Castro, 72, met the woman who saved his life for the first time since their paths crossed when the gunman made his way through the store.

More News

Latest from KTEP

For this week of On Film, guest host, Kyle Alvarado, streamed with, local filmmaker, James Arrabito about the release of his upcoming project I See a Darkness. From a Seed&Spark campaign to anticipated festival presentations across the world, James spoke about the triumphs and pitfalls of producing and releasing a local microbudget film in the midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic. With an emphasis on experimental filmmaking techniques and interpretative symbolism, I See a Darkness helps to bring the local film industry closer to innovative forefronts and streaming screens of domestic and foreign festivals. 

You are about to hear the third play in the Reunion Revolucion Radio festival: a farm for meme by Virginia Grise. It is a monologue told in two voices.

A butterfly sits in a walnut tree on a 14-acre farm in the middle of South Central Los Angeles; a mother and her three boys live in a tent in an encampment trying to save the farm from police and bulldozers; an artist norteada plants tomato plants in potholes hoping they will break open the concrete. a farm for meme is a story about semilleros and the South Central Farm, built in a vacant lot after the 1992 LA rebellion.

Virginia Grise is a recipient of the Yale Drama Award, Whiting Writers’ Award, the Princess Grace Award in Theatre Directing, and the Playwrights’ Center’s Jerome Fellowship. Her published work includes Your Healing is Killing Me (Plays Inverse Press), blu (Yale University Press), The Panza Monologues cowritten with Irma Mayorga (University of Texas Press) and an edited volume of Zapatista communiqués titled Conversations with Don Durito (Autonomedia Press).

Acting CBP Commissioner Mark Morgan interviewed at border wall
CBP / CBP

El PASO --KTEP's Angela Kocherga interviews Acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection Mark Morgan during a stop in El Psao to tour a section of border wall.  Morgan talked about what he calls the "wall system" and answered questions about a private barrier built by "We Build the Wall." The founder of that organization and president Trump's former adviser Steve Bannon were indicted for fraud and money laundering tied to the fundraising for the private wall.

Host Louie Saenz welcomes Dr. to Fullerton, Professor of Economics and Finance at UTEP to discuss the economy during the pandemic.

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

Updated at 10:31 p.m. ET

Two Louisville Metropolitan Police officers have been shot as protesters marched to demand justice for Breonna Taylor following a limited indictment by a Jefferson County grand jury.

The officers were fired on after responding to a separate "shots fired call" at about 8:30 p.m. ET, Chief Robert Schroeder said in brief press conference Wednesday evening.

One suspect has been taken into custody, Schroeder said.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, whose mask-wearing habits have been publicly inconsistent and who has declined to issue a statewide mandate for face coverings, has tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Republican governor's wife, Teresa Parson, has also tested positive.

In a brief video statement, Mike Parson said he is awaiting a second test to confirm the results.

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday suggested that he might not accept the election results if he is not declared the winner in November, in response to a reporter's question about whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power — regardless of the outcome of the election.

California will phase out the sale of all gasoline-powered vehicles by 2035 in a bid to lead the U.S. in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging the state's drivers to switch to electric cars.

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that amounts to the most aggressive clean-car policy in the United States. Although it bans the sale of new gas cars and trucks after the 15-year deadline, it will still allow such vehicles to be owned and sold on the used-car market.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

More News

NPR Politics

President Trump on Wednesday decried reported health agency efforts to issue stricter guidelines for evaluating a vaccine against COVID-19, accusing the Food and Drug Administration of playing politics.

Trump was apparently reacting to a Tuesday report in the New York Times that said the agency will soon move to tighten requirements for emergency authorization of any coronavirus vaccine to better ensure its safety and effectiveness.

When President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden face off Tuesday night in the first presidential debate, there's one topic they're not expected to get asked about: climate.

Thirty-six senators, spearheaded by Ed Markey, D-Mass., signed a letter to the Commission on Presidential Debates, urging that climate change receive more attention.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Voters in a number of swing states this November will have more leeway in getting their mail ballots back in time to count, should rule changes announced in the past week hold up to legal challenges. But the changes could delay the reporting of election results and possibly set up court fights down the line.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies in today for Terry Gross. Perhaps no issue is more critical to the outcome of the presidential election than the COVID-19 pandemic, and much depends on public perceptions of the Trump administration's handling of the crisis. Our guest, Politico reporter Dan Diamond, recently reported that politically appointed Trump loyalists in the government had demanded the right to review and seek changes in weekly scientific reports by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the status of the coronavirus outbreak.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

In a new court filing, TikTok leaders make clear just how much is at stake in a prolonged battle with the Trump administration: If TikTok were banned for two months, up to half of its users in America would never come back. If the ban persisted for six months, 90% of TikTok users would be gone forever, according to a top TikTok executive.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Jean lost her job as a school bus driver in Chicago during the pandemic. She was managing OK with unemployment money. But then, about two weeks ago, she got a desperate call from her adult son.

"His job had laid him off, and he wasn't able to pay rent," she says. There was an eviction moratorium in Chicago, but Jean says the landlord wanted her son out anyway.

She says the landlord got someone to threaten her son, and to shoot his dog — a German shepherd mix he'd had for years.

Nationwide protests have cast a spotlight on racism and inequality in the United States. Now a major bank has put a price tag on how much the economy has lost as a result of discrimination against African Americans: $16 trillion.

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

President Trump warned tech companies he is "watching them very closely during this election cycle" as his administration proposed stripping online platforms of long-held legal protections.

"We see so many things that are unfair," Trump said during at a White House discussion with Republican state attorneys general about social media. "It's very serious. Very bad. Very serious."

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

Gale Sayers, a graceful and quick Chicago Bears running back whose elusiveness bedeviled defenses and delighted fans, has died, the team and the NFL announced Wednesday. He was 77.

Sayers was a fearsome competitor, but he was also famous for his character and fortitude.

The story of the Black football star's friendship with a white teammate, Brian Piccolo, inspired the beloved 1971 TV movie Brian's Song, after Sayers used his acceptance speech for the NFL's Most Courageous Player award to praise his less-heralded friend who was battling cancer.

"Plucky" is one of those words that doesn't get out and about much anymore.

Something about it feels off, a bit — regressive, condescending, even vaguely sexist, as it's usually only seen in the company of the word "heroine" these days.

There's this one story, in a new book by comic artist Allie Brosh, where four guys dress a dog in a humiliating costume and parade him down Las Vegas Boulevard — all to celebrate some human's birthday. Needless to say, the dog is confused, and overwhelmed.

Sometimes humans struggle to find the words to convey the sheer depth of their love for one another. Leave it to Sam McBratney's Little Nutbrown Hare and Big Nutbrown Hare in Guess How Much I Love You to show us the way.

They love each other as high as they can hop, they love each other across the river and over the hills, and finally, all the way up to the sky.

McBratney died at his home in County Antrim, Northern Ireland surrounded by family on September 18, according to his publisher, Walker Books. He was 77. No cause of death was given.

The writer Laila Lalami is originally from Morocco. She moved to California as a grad student.

She thought when she finished school, she'd go home. But then she fell in love with — and married — an American. His parents were Cuban immigrants.

Lalami writes about what it means for her to be an American citizen in her new book, Conditional Citizens; by her definition those are citizens who are sometimes embraced by America, and sometimes rejected.

More NPR Arts News

Enrollment at U.S. community colleges has dropped nearly 8 percent this fall, newly released figures show, part of an overall decline in undergraduate enrollment as students face a global pandemic and the worst economic recession in decades.

Updated at 10:31 p.m. ET

Two Louisville Metropolitan Police officers have been shot as protesters marched to demand justice for Breonna Taylor following a limited indictment by a Jefferson County grand jury.

The officers were fired on after responding to a separate "shots fired call" at about 8:30 p.m. ET, Chief Robert Schroeder said in brief press conference Wednesday evening.

One suspect has been taken into custody, Schroeder said.

President Trump on Wednesday decried reported health agency efforts to issue stricter guidelines for evaluating a vaccine against COVID-19, accusing the Food and Drug Administration of playing politics.

Trump was apparently reacting to a Tuesday report in the New York Times that said the agency will soon move to tighten requirements for emergency authorization of any coronavirus vaccine to better ensure its safety and effectiveness.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, whose mask-wearing habits have been publicly inconsistent and who has declined to issue a statewide mandate for face coverings, has tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Republican governor's wife, Teresa Parson, has also tested positive.

In a brief video statement, Mike Parson said he is awaiting a second test to confirm the results.

New York's famed Metropolitan Opera announced on Wednesday that the house will remain closed until September 2021.

In a press release, the Met said that it had made its decision to cancel the rest of the 2020-21 season based on the advice of "health officials who advise the Met and Lincoln Center," and keeping in mind the hundreds of performers and staff members required for rehearsals and performances as well as its audiences.

In a new court filing, TikTok leaders make clear just how much is at stake in a prolonged battle with the Trump administration: If TikTok were banned for two months, up to half of its users in America would never come back. If the ban persisted for six months, 90% of TikTok users would be gone forever, according to a top TikTok executive.

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday suggested that he might not accept the election results if he is not declared the winner in November, in response to a reporter's question about whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power — regardless of the outcome of the election.

California will phase out the sale of all gasoline-powered vehicles by 2035 in a bid to lead the U.S. in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging the state's drivers to switch to electric cars.

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that amounts to the most aggressive clean-car policy in the United States. Although it bans the sale of new gas cars and trucks after the 15-year deadline, it will still allow such vehicles to be owned and sold on the used-car market.

About 35 years ago, violinist Lara St. John — then just 15 years old — went with two friends to the dean of the school she attended, Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music, to say that her private teacher, the famed violin pedagogue Jascha Brodsky, had sexually abused her on multiple occasions.

When President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden face off Tuesday night in the first presidential debate, there's one topic they're not expected to get asked about: climate.

Thirty-six senators, spearheaded by Ed Markey, D-Mass., signed a letter to the Commission on Presidential Debates, urging that climate change receive more attention.

Pages