KTEP - El Paso, Texas

A Message From KTEP's General Manager

Apr 3, 2020

In the past couple of weeks, KTEP has received calls and emails from you, our listeners, asking about our well-being and when the KTEP Spring On-Air Pledge Drive will take place.  First, I am deeply touched by your concern.  In consultation with the staff, I have made the decision to postpone our usual Spring On-Air Pledge Drive.  I cannot, in good conscience, place the health of our staff or the health of our volunteers in jeopardy.

The Weekend - Pandemics and the Economy

Host Louie Saenz welcomes UTEP Professor of Economics and Chair of the Study of Trade in the Americas, Dr. Tom Fullerton to discuss the impact of Covid-19 on the economy. Borderplex Pandemic Monitor... https://scholarworks.utep.edu/border_region/98/

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Local News

El Paso George Floyd protest at police headquarters
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

EL PASO – Hundreds of protestors gathered in El Paso Sunday night chanting “I can’t breathe” as they marched to El Paso Police Department headquarters. 

“I want to be out here with my brothers and sisters that I go to school with and make sure that we all have a voice for later on in life,” said 21-year-old Zachary Greenhoward.

Carmen Lugo and her dog Bunny in the courtyard of the apartment complex where they live.
Angela Kocherga / KTEP

El Paso -- Carmen Lugo cannot imagine being cooped up during the COVID-19 quarantine without her best friend. 

“She’s turned out to be the best little dog. She does everything but talk,” Lugo said. 

Bunny was a “ball of fluff” puppy when she arrived Easter morning 2013. Lugo and her white poodle terrier mix have been inseparable ever since.

“Don’t ever underestimate the power of a pet. They make you think. They make you move. They give you a lot of love,” said the 75-year-old retired hairdresser. 

People walking across Paso del Norte
Angela Kocherga / KTEP

As testing increases in El Paso, contact tracing is the next critical step to prevent the spread of COVID-19. On the border, those close contacts can include relatives, friends and coworkers in two countries.  

“This morning I contacted the health authorities in Juarez to refer them individuals that were exposed to cases that are in El Paso,” said Fernando Gonzalez, lead epidemiologist for the El Paso Department of Public Health. 

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Latest from KTEP

Brown Berets lead George Floyd protest in El Paso

5 minutes ago
Brown Berets lead protest in El Paso
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

El PASO -- El Paso’s latest protest for George Floyd marked the return of the Brown Berets,  a group that dates back to the late 1960s.  

The Brown Berets of El Chuco, organized the protest in downtown El Paso Tuesday night demanding justice for George Floyd and end to police killings.

“We’re the next generation we’re going to keep the movement strong,” said a man in his early 30s who would only give what he referred to as his native name Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec winged serpent deity.

Dr. Pannell welcomes Assistant Professor of Philosophy at The University of Texas at El Paso, Deepanwita Dasgupta to discuss the philosphy of science esp. the processes of cognitve modeling used in scientific reasoning.

The Weekend - Pandemics and the Economy

Jun 1, 2020

Host Louie Saenz welcomes UTEP Professor of Economics and Chair of the Study of Trade in the Americas, Dr. Tom Fullerton to discuss the impact of Covid-19 on the economy. Borderplex Pandemic Monitor...https://scholarworks.utep.edu/border_region/98/

Host Louie Saenz welcomes New York Times best-selling author and historian Jeff Shaara. His latest book is To Wake The Giant, A Novel of Pearl Harbor. His other books include Gods and Generals and The Frozen Hours.

El Paso Opera is providing free, curbside performances for the communitiy.  #CurbsideOpera kicked off last week and received a warm welcome from those who were surprised with a personal curbside opera concert. 

Keep your eye out for #CurbsideOpera announcements about pop up performances around town featuring El Paso Opera Resident Artists and other local vocal performers.

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Latest from NPR

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

Virginia will remove a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in the city of Richmond "as soon as possible," Gov. Ralph Northam announced Thursday.

"Today, we're here to be honest about our past and talk about our future," Northam said, adding: "We have to confront where we've been in order to shape where we're going."

The statue will be placed into storage, where it will remain until government leaders and the community can discuss its future, according to the governor.

The nationwide unrest over George Floyd's killing is being felt deeply in Ferguson, Missouri, where widespread protests over police accountability 2014 made international news.

Copyright 2020 VPM. To see more, visit VPM.

A full autopsy report on George Floyd, the man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police last month, reveals that he was positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The 20-page report also indicates that Floyd had fentanyl and methamphetamine in his system at the time of his death, although the drugs are not listed as the cause.

Copyright 2020 WABE 90.1. To see more, visit WABE 90.1.

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NPR Politics

The Justice Department is holding a press conference Thursday amid nationwide protests over racial inequality and the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Floyd died after being pinned down at the neck by a police officer, prompting massive protests across the country. The now-fired officer, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with second-degree murder.

Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says President Trump is a threat to the constitution, The Atlantic reports. Others have also spoken out about the White House's handling of nationwide unrest.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Casting a ballot by mail isn't a new way to vote, but it is getting fresh attention as the coronavirus pandemic upends daily life.

The voting method is quickly becoming the norm and quickly becoming politically charged, as some Republicans — and specifically President Trump — fight against the mail voting expansion that is happening nationwide.

Here are answers to key questions about mail ballots and the controversy around them.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Updated at 8:47 a.m. ET

The coronavirus pandemic has pushed unemployment to its highest level since the Great Depression, but the pace of layoffs has been easing. And there are now some signs that the job market could slowly start to recover.

The Labor Department says another 1.87 million people filed claims for unemployment insurance last week. That's down 249,000 from the previous week. While still very high by historical standards, the number has been declining steadily from a peak of 6.8 million the week ending March 28.

There are indications layoffs from the coronavirus pandemic may be easing. Initial claims for unemployment have been slowing, and as businesses start to reopen, some people are going back to work.

Trevon Ellis spent years building up his north Minneapolis barbershop, the Fade Factory, luring customers with smart haircuts, snacks and friendly conversation.

It took just one terrible night to destroy it all.

"Inside is totally burned down," Ellis says. "Everything was burned to a crisp."

The recent wave of protests against police brutality has left a trail of chaos and destruction in many city neighborhoods, with countless businesses looted and damaged.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Some of Facebook's earliest employees are condemning CEO Mark Zuckerberg's hands-off approach to President Trump's inflammatory rhetoric about protests over police brutality.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

I first saw Shirley months ago, back in January. It's strange to be revisiting it now. Like a lot of very good movies, it doesn't speak to this extraordinarily fraught moment, and it doesn't offer a mindless escape from it, either. What it does offer is a smart, fascinating glimpse into an artist's mind, and I hope you'll seek it out now or in the future.

In 1921, my grandmother moved from the Yorkville neighborhood of Manhattan to Rochester, New York to get married. There she lived until her death at age 109, outlasting my mother by eight years.

Nana lived in a high rise close to Mom's childhood home, a home I came to know after Mom died. Rochester was a stark and lonely place for me.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The killing of George Floyd has inspired protests across the U.S. and around the world, with crowds evoking the names of other black men and women who have died in police custody — including

Brit Bennett's first novel, The Mothers, was the sort of smashingly successful debut that can make but also possibly break a young writer by raising expectations and pressure. Four years later, her second, The Vanishing Half, more than lives up to her early promise. It's an even better book, more expansive yet also deeper, a multi-generational family saga that tackles prickly issues of racial identity and bigotry and conveys the corrosive effects of secrets and dissembling.

More NPR Arts News

Brown Berets lead George Floyd protest in El Paso

5 minutes ago
Brown Berets lead protest in El Paso
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

El PASO -- El Paso’s latest protest for George Floyd marked the return of the Brown Berets,  a group that dates back to the late 1960s.  

The Brown Berets of El Chuco, organized the protest in downtown El Paso Tuesday night demanding justice for George Floyd and end to police killings.

“We’re the next generation we’re going to keep the movement strong,” said a man in his early 30s who would only give what he referred to as his native name Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec winged serpent deity.

I first saw Shirley months ago, back in January. It's strange to be revisiting it now. Like a lot of very good movies, it doesn't speak to this extraordinarily fraught moment, and it doesn't offer a mindless escape from it, either. What it does offer is a smart, fascinating glimpse into an artist's mind, and I hope you'll seek it out now or in the future.

The Justice Department is holding a press conference Thursday amid nationwide protests over racial inequality and the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Floyd died after being pinned down at the neck by a police officer, prompting massive protests across the country. The now-fired officer, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with second-degree murder.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

Virginia will remove a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in the city of Richmond "as soon as possible," Gov. Ralph Northam announced Thursday.

"Today, we're here to be honest about our past and talk about our future," Northam said, adding: "We have to confront where we've been in order to shape where we're going."

The statue will be placed into storage, where it will remain until government leaders and the community can discuss its future, according to the governor.

Hong Kong's legislature has passed a bill making it a crime to poke fun at China's national anthem — a move that puts new limits on anniversary events marking the Tiananmen Square massacre. Under the ban, it is illegal to alter the lyrics of the anthem, or to sing it "in a distorted or disrespectful way."

Updated at 8:47 a.m. ET

The coronavirus pandemic has pushed unemployment to its highest level since the Great Depression, but the pace of layoffs has been easing. And there are now some signs that the job market could slowly start to recover.

The Labor Department says another 1.87 million people filed claims for unemployment insurance last week. That's down 249,000 from the previous week. While still very high by historical standards, the number has been declining steadily from a peak of 6.8 million the week ending March 28.

A nun in headphones is on the radio — offering expectant families advice for stimulating fetal development.

"Tell the husband to pat [your] tummy," she laughs. "And speak to the [baby]!"

When Sister Astridah Banda, a Catholic nun and social worker in Zambia, first went on the air, she recalls that people were jolted by her manner. "People are always surprised to see sisters can joke," she says. "They think you're always serious and praying – and in such instances, I look at myself and say 'Madame, you and I are one and the same."

In 1921, my grandmother moved from the Yorkville neighborhood of Manhattan to Rochester, New York to get married. There she lived until her death at age 109, outlasting my mother by eight years.

Nana lived in a high rise close to Mom's childhood home, a home I came to know after Mom died. Rochester was a stark and lonely place for me.

The nationwide unrest over George Floyd's killing is being felt deeply in Ferguson, Missouri, where widespread protests over police accountability 2014 made international news.

Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says President Trump is a threat to the constitution, The Atlantic reports. Others have also spoken out about the White House's handling of nationwide unrest.

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