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STATE OF THE ARTS - The Tornillo Collective

Tornillo Collective Artists and Writers, Nancy Lorenza Green and Raquel Barrientos Mejia wrote a play which focuses on the border and immigration called “Escape From Tornillo.” The two-act play directed by Valerie Muruato and written by The Tornillo Collective is about unaccompanied refugee minors in detention centers like those found in Tornillo, Texas.

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Good to Grow - Fall planting

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Good to Grow Master gardeners talk fall planting and some container gardening tips to color up your home patios and porches.

Host Louie Saenz sits down with members of the National British Debate team, Niahm Thompson and Dan Scanio. They recently debated the UTEP Forensic team this month on the UTEP campus.

The El Paso Film Festival is rolling into its second year stronger than ever. For four days, Downtown El Paso will host a variety of film screenings with works from emerging filmmakers to established independent producers. Founder and Artistic Director of the Festival, Carlos Corral, stopped by the KTEP studios to discuss the upcoming festival. With a variety of locations, narrative and documentary films, and special guest Robert Rodriguez, El Paso's premiere film festival is one not to miss. The festival runs from Oct. 24th - 27th. Tickets are available online or at the Plaza Theatre Box Office

Tornillo Collective Artists and Writers, Nancy Lorenza Green and Raquel Barrientos Mejia wrote a play which focuses on the border and immigration called “Escape From Tornillo.” 

 The two-act play directed by Valerie Muruato and written by The Tornillo Collective is about unaccompanied refugee minors in detention centers like those found in Tornillo, Texas. 

  

ActorSpace provides a safe, inspiring, professional place for actors, directors and filmmakers to work and play; a place to challenge and grow their skills. 

 Through a comprehensive approach, covering a range of material and an amalgamation of techniques, the primary focus in ActorSpace classes and workshops is on finding and nurturing what works for each individual artist.

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Imagine you are forced to go to a hospital to receive psychiatric treatment that you don't think you need. What rights would you have?

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Technology that would prevent you from driving if you have had too much to drink could become mandatory in all new cars. That is if legislation now in Congress becomes law. NPR's Vanessa Romo reports on two bills to require automakers to build new cars and trucks with alcohol detection systems.

VANESSA ROMO, BYLINE: Before Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was Senator Tom Udall, he was that state's attorney general. And back then - we're talking the 1990s...

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House Democrats are set to resume their impeachment inquiry on Tuesday with a deposition from another diplomat who appeared uneasy with President Trump's strategy to pressure Ukraine for political help.

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As cars become smarter and safer, some members of Congress want to require them to be built to prevent drunk driving.

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In one corner of Nordstrom's new flagship store in New York City, interlocking Burberry logos covered every surface. Dramatic string music played. And beyond the merchandise, a small cafe doused in bright pink seemed to be just waiting for someone to pose for a photo.

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Facebook announced new efforts Monday to curb the spread of false information on its platform ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

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Three of the biggest U.S. drug distributors and a drug manufacturer have reached a last-minute deal with two Ohio counties to avoid what would have been the first trial in a landmark federal case on the opioid crisis.

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Even in a pop cultural landscape dominated by costumed superheroes and masked vigilantes, HBO's new series Watchmen stands out. Watchmen was originally a comic that first came out in 1986, and it was seen as groundbreaking for its realistic and complex handling of what it might mean for someone to put on a mask and fight crime.

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Tonight HBO premieres a new four-part miniseries called "Catherine The Great" starring Helen Mirren as the 18th century Russian empress. Our TV critic David Bianculli has this review.

In the 1960s, Janis Joplin was an icon of the counterculture, a female rock star at a time when rock was an all-boys' club.

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Japan's Emperor Naruhito proclaimed his ascension to the Chrysanthemum Throne on Tuesday, appearing in a brownish-orange ceremonial robe in a ritual attended by representatives of more than 180 countries.

The elaborate, 30-minute ceremony formalizes the transition from Naruhito's father, Akihito, who abdicated in April. The following month, Naruhito officially assumed the throne. He is the 126th emperor in a line of hereditary monarchs that is believed to go back 1,500 years in Japan.

Even in a pop cultural landscape dominated by costumed superheroes and masked vigilantes, HBO's new series Watchmen stands out. Watchmen was originally a comic that first came out in 1986, and it was seen as groundbreaking for its realistic and complex handling of what it might mean for someone to put on a mask and fight crime.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

House Democrats are set to resume their impeachment inquiry on Tuesday with a deposition from another diplomat who appeared uneasy with President Trump's strategy to pressure Ukraine for political help.

Ambassador William Taylor, who has been serving as the interim head of the U.S. diplomatic mission to Kyiv, is scheduled to talk behind closed doors with members and staff of the Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees.

About three weeks ago, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had a heart attack that threw his campaign into question. But now, it's more apparent than perhaps at any point in this presidential campaign that the 78-year-old white-haired politician and his revolution will remain a powerful force in the Democratic primary.

Trump administration officials are expected to be grilled about Syria by angry lawmakers from both parties Tuesday afternoon.

Imagine you are forced to go to a hospital to receive psychiatric treatment that you don't think you need. What rights would you have?

That's the question at the heart of a legal battle between the state of New Hampshire and the American Civil Liberties Union.

The case has big implications for New Hampshire, but it also highlights a nationwide problem: A shortage of mental health beds is leaving patients stranded in emergency rooms for days or weeks at a time.

Anxiety and agitation

Updated at 3:25 a.m. ET

Canada's Liberals appear to have won the most seats in Parliament — a result likely to hand Justin Trudeau a second term as prime minister despite a series of scandals that have rocked his government.

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