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FALL PLEDGE DRIVE - Keep KTEP Going Strong!

Oct 26, 2021

October brings a change of season and joyful anticipation of the upcoming holidays.  For KTEP, October also brings our Fall Pledge Drive.  Once again, we are erring on the side of caution and holding the pledge drive online.

Juarez crime scene
Corrie Boudreaux / El Paso Matters

Mexico fights legal battle in US court to reduce gun smuggling across border

EL PASO --What was supposed to be a routine search by Mexican National Guard troops is under investigation after an 18-year-old U.S. citizen was shot and killed in Ciudad Juárez. Juan Carlos Medina died near the Paso del Norte Bridge after crossing from El Paso in the early hours of Nov. 20. Medina’s relatives say he was killed while trying to flee and want authorities to check surveillance cameras in the area. Mexican National Guard soldiers say they found two handguns in the teen’s backpack...

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Todd Oldham, Cocktail dress and skirt, 1996. Silk ribbon. Texas Fashion Collection, University of North Texas, Gift of Todd Oldham Studios, 1999.003.017, 018.

State of the Arts - Fashion Nirvana: Runway to Everyday

Local News

Solider with Afghan children
Staff Sgt. Michael West / U.S. Army - Fort Bliss

FORT BLISS -- From a helicopter high above the desert landscape dotted with scrub brush, row after row of large white tents stand out against the golden brown terrain. 

Each tent can house up to 100 “guests” as the Army refers to the Afghan evacuees. About 10,000 people from Afghanistan are living at Fort Bliss, one of eight army installations temporarily housing the evacuees.

In a matter of a three weeks, Fort Bliss transformed a 1960s era training camp with sleeping quarters for 1800 soldiers into a massive operation

Border fence at sunset
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

A lot has changed along the border since September 11, 2001. The attack led to the creation of the massive, cabinet-level, Department of Homeland Security and disruptions in daily life for those who cross back and forth. An estimated $330 billion has been spent ramping up border security including doubling the size of the Border Patrol, now the largest law enforcement agency in the country. There's also more technology for U.S.

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Latest from KTEP

Juarez crime scene
Corrie Boudreaux / El Paso Matters

EL PASO --What was supposed to be a routine search by Mexican National Guard troops is under investigation after an 18-year-old U.S. citizen was shot and killed in Ciudad Juárez.

Juan Carlos Medina died near the Paso del Norte Bridge after crossing from El Paso in the early hours of Nov. 20. Medina’s relatives say he was killed while trying to flee and want authorities to check surveillance cameras in the area. Mexican National Guard soldiers say they found two handguns in the teen’s backpack, according to Chihuahua state investigators.

Good To Grow

Nov 30, 2021

In this episode of Good To Grow, Denise and Jan discuss which plants are best for the holidays as well as how to take care of them during the winter season.

Laughter can boost heart health and immunity, improve sleep and memory, reduce stress, and much more. And using humor can be an important and effective tool to speak truths about important issues including animal exploitation and veganism. On ACT RadioGregLiz and Tom talk with renowned vegan comedian Myq Kaplan about his path to veganism and some of his funny experiences and perspectives on plant-based eating. 

Border Art Residency artist Bella Maria Varela will debut a new exhibition titled La Xingada Vol. 3, at the Border Art Residency headquarters at 801 N. Piedras in Five Points.

This show is an immersive exhibition combining textile and video work by Bella Maria Varela with papier mâché masks by Xingaderas (Manuel Urueta and Celina Galicia).

Season 1: Episode 4, The One with all the Squares is a group exhibition featuring the works of 48 artists from El Paso and beyond. The show is on display at the El Paso Frame Co. through December 23rd. 

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It is dusk at Oliveira Park, in Brownsville — the southern most city in Texas. A large, noisy flock of birds with brilliant green plumages and red splotches on their heads is fluttering in from the west as the sun sets. The Red-Crowned Parrot — beloved by locals, and threatened by habitat loss and pet poachers --has arrived to roost in the eucalyptus trees.

"Did you hear that enh-enh-enh-enh-enh by any chance?" asks a pony-tailed, sandals-wearing scientist named Karl Berg. "They're coming!"

Copyright 2021 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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After months of infighting and public negotiation over their far-reaching legislation, Democrats are relying, in part, on the Biden administration's sales job over the coming months to try and salvage their shaky congressional majorities.

Two of the administration's top spokespeople, Vice President Harris and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, were making that effort together Thursday in Charlotte, N.C., where they promoted the recently enacted infrastructure law.

When the Supreme Court hands down its decision in a highly-watched Mississippi abortion case this summer, access to legal abortion could end for more than 100 million Americans, including those living in nearly every Southern state and large swaths of the Midwest.

Updated December 2, 2021 at 9:25 PM ET

A day before the federal government is scheduled to run out of money, Congress on Thursday approved a short-term spending bill that will keep federal agencies running through Feb. 18, 2022.

The legislation now goes to President Biden, who needs to sign it before the midnight deadline on Friday to avoid any lapse in funding.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

The U.S. is now one of two dozen countries that have confirmed cases of the omicron variant.

NOEL KING, HOST:

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NPR Business News

Updated December 3, 2021 at 8:52 AM ET

Hiring slowed dramatically last month as COVID-19 cases rose, even before the arrival of a new and and even more worrisome coronavirus variant, which could put another speed bump on the road to labor market recovery.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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NPR Arts News

The writer Wil Haygood grew up watching movies with mostly white actors — Elizabeth Taylor, John Wayne, Henry Fonda.

"They all had one thing in common — they were all white. As a little kid, I never saw a Black actor," Haygood said.

Black actors were on screen, but mostly in the background.

So, in his new book, Colorization: One Hundred Years Of Black Films In A White World, Haygood puts them in the foreground, exploring the history of Black artists in Hollywood.

Dave Draper, the sinewy former Mr. Universe known as "the Blond Bomber," who inspired a generation of bodybuilders including Arnold Schwarzenegger, has died. He was 79.

His wife Laree Draper wrote on Facebook that he died on Tuesday, without giving a cause of death.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

It's not exactly an "Antiques Roadshow" moment.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "ANTIQUES ROADSHOW")

KEN SANDERS: Your hymnal would sell between 40- to $50,000.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Oh, gosh.

In his first interview since a fatal shooting on the set of the film Rust, actor Alec Baldwin told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that he didn't pull the trigger of the gun that killed a cinematographer.

Halyna Hutchins died after being helicoptered to a hospital, and a film director was injured after the gun went off on Oct. 21 on the set in New Mexico.

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British diver Tom Daley won fans for his habit of knitting between events at the Tokyo Olympics. Now he's converted that hobby into a business, launching a website that sells knitting kits for sweaters, blankets, accessories and even a pink flamingo named Elvis.

Daley's Made with Love site recently went live, giving his fans — many of whom have long followed his knitting exploits on Instagram — a new chance to purl along with the 27-year-old gold medalist.

The writer Wil Haygood grew up watching movies with mostly white actors — Elizabeth Taylor, John Wayne, Henry Fonda.

"They all had one thing in common — they were all white. As a little kid, I never saw a Black actor," Haygood said.

Black actors were on screen, but mostly in the background.

So, in his new book, Colorization: One Hundred Years Of Black Films In A White World, Haygood puts them in the foreground, exploring the history of Black artists in Hollywood.

South Korea's return to normal life has come to a halt with fast-surging COVID-19 infections. Health authorities announced Friday that they are tightening coronavirus restrictions, after the country's number of daily new cases doubled in the past month.

Private gatherings in the capital area will be limited to six people starting Monday, and a proof of vaccination or negative PCR test will be required at restaurants, coffee shops, libraries, museums, and movie theaters.

It is dusk at Oliveira Park, in Brownsville — the southern most city in Texas. A large, noisy flock of birds with brilliant green plumages and red splotches on their heads is fluttering in from the west as the sun sets. The Red-Crowned Parrot — beloved by locals, and threatened by habitat loss and pet poachers --has arrived to roost in the eucalyptus trees.

"Did you hear that enh-enh-enh-enh-enh by any chance?" asks a pony-tailed, sandals-wearing scientist named Karl Berg. "They're coming!"

Updated December 3, 2021 at 8:52 AM ET

Hiring slowed dramatically last month as COVID-19 cases rose, even before the arrival of a new and and even more worrisome coronavirus variant, which could put another speed bump on the road to labor market recovery.

Copyright 2021 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

This week, Wesleyan University in Connecticut held its first booster vaccine clinic on campus. CJ Joseph, a first-year student still figuring out what to major in, wasted no time signing up.

Less than a year ago, when Comet Leonard was first discovered, it was still an incredibly dim and obscure chunk of rock traveling out near the orbit of Jupiter.

Now it's reached our neighborhood of the solar system on its journey toward the sun and it's being billed as the brightest comet of the year.

Here's how to see it:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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