KTEP - El Paso, Texas

A Message From KTEP's General Manager

Sep 14, 2020

KTEP is currently conducting its 2021 Spring Pledge Drive.  Like so many other businesses, KTEP has also seen losses in some revenue streams but that has not deterred us from providing you with the best public radio has to offer.  As we like to say, “KTEP, Always There When You Need Us.”

A little over a year ago, our community along with the rest of nation experienced a disruption in our way of life due to the pandemic.  (click on headline to continue)

 


informal workers window cleaner
Corrie Boudreaux / El Paso Matters

Crucial cross-border labor force disrupted by pandemic travel restrictions

EL PASO -- A year after the U.S. border was closed to all non-essential travel, the pandemic has underscored an informal economy that many fronterizos prefer not to talk about even as they struggle to adapt to a new reality. “We were quickly trying to scramble and figure out what we do next,” said Patricia, a single mother of three in El Paso. Her family relied on a woman from Ciudad Juárez to help care for her ailing grandmother. Across the border in Ciudad Juárez, Catalina depended on the...

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Local News

Memory Bear Ramos
Gina Ramos

CIUDAD JUAREZ -- Every time Gina Ramos looks at her teddy bear, she remembers her father. The bear is a deep indigo color, made from one of her father’s shirts. “It’s a blue shirt I had given him on his birthday. His last birthday,” Ramos said.  Her 62 year-old father Jose Womhar Ramos Hernandez died in December.

Claudia Araceli Ramirez Pereira’s bear is blue and white plaid with a touch of brown, made from her father’s favorite winter jacket. “This year he didn’t get to wear it,” said Ramirez. Her father 70-year old father Lorenzo Ramirez died in October.

Border Fence/Wall Sunland Park
Angela Kocherga / KTEP

 

 

 

PALOMAS, Mexico –  Jhon Jairo Ushca Alcoser, a 25-year-old migrant from Ecuador, said when he fell off the border wall, “my dream” of reaching the U.S. ended. 

 

  

Pedro Gomez, 37, of Guatemala was so determined after he injured himself toppling off the top of the fence, he “crawled on hands and knees” away from the structure because he couldn’t walk. 

 

Fort Bliss Training
Staff Sgt. Michael West / U.S. Army

EL PASO – The Army has launched a criminal investigation after eleven Fort Bliss soldiers were hospitalized suffering from antifreeze poisoning. The soldiers are recovering at William Beaumont Army Medical center. They were sickened Thursday at the end of a 10-day field training exercise at McGregor Range.

“Initial reports indicate soldiers consumed this substance, thinking they were drinking alcoholic beverage,” said Lt. Col. Allie Payne, a Fort Bliss spokeswoman for the 1st Armored Division during a news conference Friday afternoon.

Missing Fort Bliss Soldier
Halliday Family

EL PASO – As the Army continues to search for missing soldier Pvt. Richard Halliday, the commanding general at Fort Bliss has ordered an investigation of the soldier’s unit. 

“I directed an investigation into the leadership, climate and treatment of soldiers in the 1st Battalion 43rd Air Defense Artillery Battalion, “said Maj. General Sean C. Bernabe, senior mission commander at Fort Bliss.

Bernabe announced the investigation during an extensive update on the case for handful of journalists on post. 

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Latest from KTEP

The Border Art Residency is accepting applications for its summer artist residency, which takes place from June 1 - August 1, 2021. The deadline to apply is Friday, April 23, 2021.

The artist-in-residence is provided a fully furnished living and work space, a $600 monthly stipend, and paid utilities, with the exception of phone and internet. 

Colorado artist Carissa Samaniego is the Border Art Residency’s current resident artist. She was chosen to be the first artist to break in their new studio and living space in El Paso’s Five Points neighborhood.

Samaniego is a sculptor who works in various media and with unconventional materials to create pieces that represent the place she works in, to find distinct ways of knowing that are emblematic of their site of origin. 

You're invited to join the Green Hope Project kickoff on April 17th, 2021 from 10am to noon.  The kickoff event includes their famed trash to treasure awards ceremony featuring special guests Congresswoman Veronica Escobar, Michael Reynolds and Ellen Smyth.

The project will also feature workshops throughout the months of April & May. 

The City of El Paso has announced timelines to phase in the reopening of various quality of life services. The El Paso Museum of Art and the El Paso Museum of History are currently open, as well as the Downtown Art and Farmers Market.  

Here to tell us about it is Director of  Cultural Affairs and Recreation, Ben Fyffe.

Prospect Spirits is an El Paso distillery that is making handmade products right here in the Sun City.

So far, their spirit offerings include Free Range Vodka, Alley Cat Gin, and Brindle Bourbon.

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Chris Reimer had never heard of Leopold, Mo., when he found himself rushing down a winding, two-lane road toward the rural, 65-person community in February.

Reimer, a social media manager in St. Louis, had made a split-second decision when he saw a local television reporter tweet about a 2,000-dose COVID-19 vaccination clinic opening to anyone after 3 p.m. that day.

Updated April 20, 2021 at 2:53 PM ET

A bipartisan group of lawmakers is renewing a push that failed during the previous administration to extend the deadlines for reporting 2020 census results after the pandemic and Trump officials' interference disrupted the count.

What We Know About The Jurors In The Chauvin Trial

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Closing statements concluded Monday afternoon in the trial of ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. His fate is now in the hands of 12 jurors. They include a chemist, a youth volunteer, a cardiac nurse and an IT professional.

When Armya Williams heard last week that a Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer had shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop, she knew she needed to do something.

"After Daunte Wright, I was like, 'Really? It hasn't even been a year since George Floyd died,' " Williams said. "I was just like, we need to do something. So I started brainstorming, getting ideas from other students and I came about a walkout. That's one way we can get our voices heard."

The panel of 12 jurors weighing the case against the fired Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd has resumed deliberations.

The jury, who are sequestered in a nearby hotel under the supervision of Hennepin County Sheriff's deputies, are considering three charges against former officer Derek Chauvin: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

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NPR Politics

Updated April 20, 2021 at 2:17 PM ET

President Biden, speaking as the jury in Derek Chauvin's murder trial is sequestered in its second day of deliberations, said Tuesday that he is "praying the verdict is the right verdict, which is, I think it's overwhelming in my view."

Biden told reporters in the Oval Office that he has reached out to family members of George Floyd as they, and the nation, await the outcome of the trial of the former Minneapolis police officer accused of killing Floyd.

Updated April 20, 2021 at 2:24 PM ET

When Joe Biden offered his condolences to the loved ones of George Floyd in a video address that played at Floyd's funeral service last year, he posed a question.

"Why, in this nation, do too many Black Americans wake up knowing they could lose their life in the course of living their life?" Biden asked.

Biden, then his party's presumptive presidential nominee, urged the country in that speech to use Floyd's death as a call for action to address systemic racism.

A dozen Central Americans in T-shirts that read Mujeres Luchadores — Fighting Women — marched through a small Texas town last month toward the gates of an imposing private detention center where they all used to be incarcerated.

"Biden, hear us! Shut down Hutto!" they chanted.

They're referring to T. Don Hutto Residential Center, the former state prison in Taylor — just northeast of Austin — named after the founder of the private prison company that holds the contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

For decades, the size of the U.S. House of Representatives has pitted state against state in a fight for political power after each census.

That's because, for the most part, there is a number that has not changed for more than a century — the 435 seats for the House's voting members.

While the House did temporarily add two seats after Alaska and Hawaii became states in 1959, a law passed in 1929 has set up that de facto cap to representation.

Updated April 20, 2021 at 4:22 AM ET

Walter Mondale, a former vice president and U.S. senator, died on Monday in Minneapolis, a family spokesperson told NPR. The Minnesota Democrat was 93 years old.

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Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Copyright 2021 KCRW. To see more, visit KCRW.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

My orange skateboard was plastered in peeling stickers and a dark layer of dust when I found it in my childhood bedroom last May. I hadn't touched it in seven years, but it called to me at that moment. I needed to get out of the house, have fun, even feel the thrill of a different kind of danger — one that had nothing to do with a virus. My 25-year-old sister, Frances, needed it, too. We stepped on our boards, pushed off, and in the air between the rushing pavement below us and the sunset sky above, we were absolutely free.

A lot of people were craving that feeling in 2020.

A state court in Tennessee has punished Endo Pharmaceuticals for improperly withholding a vast trove of documents relating to the sale and marketing of its opioid medication Opana ER.

The judge presiding over the civil trial also concluded the drugmaker and its attorneys made at least a dozen false statements during the pretrial fact-finding process.

"It appears to the court that Endo and its attorneys, after delaying trial, have resorted to trying to improperly corrupt the record," wrote Chancellor E.G. Moody in a judgment issued on April 6.

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Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Writer Lauren Hough grew up in a nomadic doomsday Christian cult called the Children of God. She says she remembers being taught animals could talk to Noah — that's how he was able to get them on to the ark — and that heaven was located in a pyramid in the moon.

"I had problems with [the teachings] pretty early on, but I couldn't express those," she says. "Probably the earliest thing I learned is just keep your mouth shut — and I couldn't, which was a problem."

The new book World Travel: An Irreverent Guide is credited to Anthony Bourdain. But it was not really written by the bestselling author, chef and TV personality who died in 2018.

Copyright 2021 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.

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Chris Reimer had never heard of Leopold, Mo., when he found himself rushing down a winding, two-lane road toward the rural, 65-person community in February.

Reimer, a social media manager in St. Louis, had made a split-second decision when he saw a local television reporter tweet about a 2,000-dose COVID-19 vaccination clinic opening to anyone after 3 p.m. that day.

Updated April 20, 2021 at 2:53 PM ET

A bipartisan group of lawmakers is renewing a push that failed during the previous administration to extend the deadlines for reporting 2020 census results after the pandemic and Trump officials' interference disrupted the count.

What We Know About The Jurors In The Chauvin Trial

1 hour ago

Closing statements concluded Monday afternoon in the trial of ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. His fate is now in the hands of 12 jurors. They include a chemist, a youth volunteer, a cardiac nurse and an IT professional.

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Idriss Déby Itno, the president of Chad and one of Africa's longest-serving leaders, was killed in the country's north, where he had traveled to observe the fight against rebel insurgents, state media reported Tuesday.

The announcement came just hours after election officials in Chad certified that Déby, 68, had carried nearly 80% of the vote in April 11 polls, setting him up for a sixth five-year term as president.

When Armya Williams heard last week that a Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer had shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop, she knew she needed to do something.

"After Daunte Wright, I was like, 'Really? It hasn't even been a year since George Floyd died,' " Williams said. "I was just like, we need to do something. So I started brainstorming, getting ideas from other students and I came about a walkout. That's one way we can get our voices heard."

The panel of 12 jurors weighing the case against the fired Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd has resumed deliberations.

The jury, who are sequestered in a nearby hotel under the supervision of Hennepin County Sheriff's deputies, are considering three charges against former officer Derek Chauvin: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Writer Lauren Hough grew up in a nomadic doomsday Christian cult called the Children of God. She says she remembers being taught animals could talk to Noah — that's how he was able to get them on to the ark — and that heaven was located in a pyramid in the moon.

"I had problems with [the teachings] pretty early on, but I couldn't express those," she says. "Probably the earliest thing I learned is just keep your mouth shut — and I couldn't, which was a problem."

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