KTEP - El Paso, Texas

A Message From KTEP's General Manager

Sep 14, 2020

As we begin to enter a new year, there is cause to reflect on all that has taken place in past months.  Most notably, our community like so many across our nation was affected physically, mentally, even spiritually because of the pandemic.  This challenge brought out the worst in some and the very best in most.  Here in our own community, every day people became heroes by stepping forth to help those in need.  Our medical/healthcare workers, first responders, teachers, grocery workers and other essential personnel did not hesitate to provide a helping hand, a shoulder, or a kind word when it was needed.

 


Border Fence/Wall Sunland Park
Angela Kocherga / KTEP

Injured Migrants say they were sent to Mexico without medical care after falling off border wall

PALOMAS, Mexico – Jhon Jairo Ushca Alcoser, a 25-year-old migrant from Ecuador, said when he fell off the border wall, “my dream” of reaching the U.S. ended. Pedro Gomez, 37, of Guatemala was so determined after he injured himself toppling off the top of the fence, he “crawled on hands and knees” away from the structure because he couldn’t walk. The men are now recovering in a migrant shelter in this desolate border town about 90 miles from where they fell off the fence. They were swiftly...

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Border Fence/Wall Sunland Park
Angela Kocherga / KTEP

 

 

 

PALOMAS, Mexico –  Jhon Jairo Ushca Alcoser, a 25-year-old migrant from Ecuador, said when he fell off the border wall, “my dream” of reaching the U.S. ended. 

 

  

Pedro Gomez, 37, of Guatemala was so determined after he injured himself toppling off the top of the fence, he “crawled on hands and knees” away from the structure because he couldn’t walk. 

 

Fort Bliss Training
Staff Sgt. Michael West / U.S. Army

EL PASO – The Army has launched a criminal investigation after eleven Fort Bliss soldiers were hospitalized suffering from antifreeze poisoning. The soldiers are recovering at William Beaumont Army Medical center. They were sickened Thursday at the end of a 10-day field training exercise at McGregor Range.

“Initial reports indicate soldiers consumed this substance, thinking they were drinking alcoholic beverage,” said Lt. Col. Allie Payne, a Fort Bliss spokeswoman for the 1st Armored Division during a news conference Friday afternoon.

Missing Fort Bliss Soldier
Halliday Family

EL PASO – As the Army continues to search for missing soldier Pvt. Richard Halliday, the commanding general at Fort Bliss has ordered an investigation of the soldier’s unit. 

“I directed an investigation into the leadership, climate and treatment of soldiers in the 1st Battalion 43rd Air Defense Artillery Battalion, “said Maj. General Sean C. Bernabe, senior mission commander at Fort Bliss.

Bernabe announced the investigation during an extensive update on the case for handful of journalists on post. 

U.S. Congresswoman Veronica Escobar
Veronica Escobar

EL PASO-- Congresswoman Veronica Escobar (D-El Paso) was one of the lawmakers in the U.S. Capitol when a pro-Trump mob stormed the building. In a phone interview with KTEP's Angela Kocherga she talks about the terrifying experience of being trapped inside as Capitol Police tried to keep the violent mob from breaking into the U.S. House Chamber. 

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Latest from KTEP

Several local artists with notable track records will create unique installations for the El Paso Children’s Museum and Science Center.

Illustrator and muralist Christin Apodaca will be creating the Desert Bloom Zone installation which will complement the exhibits designed exclusively for this project.

And now for a little change of pace, we’re going to talk about the art of the margarita.

There’s no shortage of margaritas in El Paso and today we’re talking to JR Rodriguez from Ambar at the Plaza Hotel about the art of the margarita.

Femme Frontera has new funding opportunities for self-identifying female and non-binary filmmakers from the El Paso, Las Cruces, and Juarez region.

This year, they are offering $1,500 in screenwriting grants and $5,000 in filmmaking grants to filmmakers exclusively in our border region. Grant opportunities are available at femmefrontera.org

Deadline for grant submission is March 15, 2021.

Liquid Gates of Time is an exhibition at the Rubin Center by two artists who examine border dynamics through a variety of media.

Here to talk about it is curator Kate Green.

Host Louie Saenz welcomes  Samuel K. Dolan is a documentary writer, director and Emmy Award winning Producer. Dolan, who grew up in Northern Arizona, got his start in the entertainment industry at the age of 13 when he spent the summer of 1993 riding horses on the set of the feature film Tombstone and the author of Hell Paso.

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The U.S. Supreme Court seemed ready on Tuesday to uphold Arizona's restrictive voting laws, setting the stage for what happens in the coming months and years, as Republican-dominated state legislatures seek to make voting more difficult.

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