KTEP - El Paso, Texas

A Message From KTEP's General Manager

Sep 14, 2020

September 14 is an important day in our history.  It marks our 70th birthday!  KTEP was licensed on September 14, 1950.  On September 14, you will begin to hear promos asking for your pledges.  Throughout this pandemic and the past 70 years, KTEP has not faltered in making sure that the station remained on the air providing you with the information you have come to expect…the programs that make up a part of your day.  I invite you to go our website: ktep.org and visit our gift-giving page.  I am graciously asking that you come forward now and help make this pledge drive the most successful one in our history.

 

Pandemic Christmas Decorations
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

Border families cope with deadly COVID-19 surge this holiday season

EL PASO-- The holidays during the pandemic are filled with anxiety and heartache that extends to both sides of the border. In Juarez, the Castillo family is in mourning confronting the first Christmas without their patriarch. “He had this gift of helping others,” said Michell Castillo remembering her father. In El Paso COVID-19 nearly claimed the Perez family matriarch. “We’re terrified,” said Jennifer Perez about the current deadly surge in cases. Her mother was sickened by COVID this summer...

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Local News

Binational voters
Ana Hernandez / Hernandez Family

EL PASO --All along the Texas-Mexico border voters with strong ties on both sides are casting ballots.  They’re US citizens whose jobs and families intersect with Mexico, and their political concerns span the border. 

Ana Hernandez grew up on the border in the sister cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. “I like going over there, it’s home,” she said of Juarez where she was born and went to school. “But this is home too,” she said of El Paso, the city where she is building her career.

Young voter
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

EL PASO -- Social justice, racism, and hate crimes have become hot-button issues on the presidential campaign trail and debate stage.  Voters in predominantly Latino El Paso are paying attention. They know the horror and heartache caused by a hate crime.  This August marked a year since a gunman from North Texas traveled to border city and went on a shooting rampage inside a Walmart.

Border Shutdown Paso del Norte Bridge
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

CIUDAD JUAREZ --It’s been more than six months since the U.S. and Mexico border closed to all but essential travel to slow the spread of COVID-19. The disruption of lives and livelihoods has been widespread on both sides during the pandemic. 

Marco Antonio Corral, 60, has watched it all unfold from the middle of the Paso del Norte Bridge where just over the borderline on the Mexican side he peddles potato chips and cold water to drivers and passengers stuck in idling cars calling out “Papitas! Agua!”  

CBP officers seize Mexican Bologna
U.S. Customs and Border Protection / CBP

EL PASO -- U.S. customs and Border Protection officers continue to seize large loads of drugs on the Texas-Mexico border.  Smuggling during the pandemic also includes a comfort food that is contraband Mexican bologna. 

Miriam Ortiz, a loyal shopper at La Mejor Texas Meat shop understands the popularity of the lunchmeat. She was at the meat market buying dinner for her family including steaks and some short ribs.  

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Latest from KTEP

Pandemic Christmas Decorations
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

EL PASO-- The holidays during the pandemic are filled with anxiety and heartache that extends to both sides of the border.  In Juarez, the Castillo family is in mourning confronting the first Christmas without their patriarch. “He had this gift of helping others,” said Michell Castillo remembering her father.

In El Paso COVID-19 nearly claimed the Perez family matriarch.  “We’re terrified,” said Jennifer Perez about the current deadly surge in cases. Her mother was sickened by COVID this summer.

“I almost died,” said Inocencia Perez.

At the start of the pandemic in March 2020, the Femme Frontera Showcase was unsure of its future.  They decided to power through the pandemic and ended up hosting a great showcase.

Today, we’re going to check in with one of Femme Frontera’s organizers Angie Reza Tures and two of the featured filmmakers Xotchil Rodriguez and Jackie Barragan.

Sugar Rush is a Netflix program where bakers from all over the world compete to win $10,000.

The upcoming second season of Sugar Rush Christmas features an El Pasoan, Ana Mariela Dominguez.

Adi Kanlic is an attorney by day and musician by night. He’s an El Pasoan living in Chicago and his band The Lusitania, is celebrating the 10-year anniversary of their Rain and Rivers album.

Charles Horak is the host of the KTEP program On Film.  He joins us today to let us know more about the ever-changing film industry during a pandemic. 

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President-elect Joe Biden is doubling down on his calls for unity and healing, reminding Americans, "We are at war with the virus not with each other." In his Thanksgiving address this week, Biden reiterated the appeal he's been making since his first speech as president-elect, when he implored everyone to "put away the harsh rhetoric," "give each other a chance," and end what he calls "this grim era of demonization in America." But the notion is proving a hard sell to many, including Biden's own supporters.

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How many more people might President Trump pardon before he leaves office January 20?

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President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to name a second high-level climate position in the White House, a counterpart to his diplomatic climate envoy John Kerry, to ramp up action dramatically at home.

A federal court in Washington, D.C., has tossed out a lawsuit filed against President Trump's efforts to exclude undocumented immigrants from a key set of census numbers.

Updated at 5:49 p.m. ET

President Trump has pardoned his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who spent years enmeshed in an often bizarre legal war with the government that sprang from the Russia investigation.

Trump announced the news Wednesday on Twitter as Americans prepared to observe the Thanksgiving holiday this week.

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NPR Business News

Yuko Watanabe had to learn a lot of plant names. She lists them with as much confidence as she does her extensive soup menu. Calathea, pothos, Swedish ivy, song of India.

For over a decade, her Yuko Kitchen has fed Los Angeles Japanese comfort food — something like your friend's mom might cook for you after the school, Watanabe says. But this pandemic spring, when streets emptied and her phones grew quiet, a mini-jungle took over the chairs and tables, her cafes pivoting to sell nourishment both for the body and the soul.

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James Wolfensohn, whose reforms as the head of the World Bank Group for a decade made him known as a champion of the world's poor, died Tuesday in New York. He was 86.

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After 28 years of hosting late-night shows, O'Brien is moving to HBO. He spoke to Fresh Air in 2019 about getting his start and how late-night TV has changed over the years.

I didn't have an interest in playing Genshin Impact at first. I kept hearing it described as a clone of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and I didn't really feel like playing a crummier version of a game I've already played.

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Comedian Dave Chappelle had a strange request for his fans. Don't stream his show.

"I'm begging you. If you ever liked me," he said in a video of a stand-up routine he shared on Tuesday. "Boycott Chappelle's Show. Do not watch it unless they pay me."

Chappelle was calling out the network Comedy Central, which first aired Chappelle's Show from 2003 to 2006. He said in the video the company licensed the show to Netflix and HBO Max without paying him or informing him about the deal.

This year, we got nature-starved. Pandemic response guidelines tried to keep people close to home. Despite that (likely because of it), national parks reported booming attendance by those so desperate for the wilds they would risk a plague.

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Bad Bunny closed his second album, YHLQMDLG, with a promise to return in nine months (so right about now) with another, which he also claimed would be his last.

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Every musician hopes their art touches someone else. Maybe it'll inspire someone, console them, make them feel less alone. Well, every Thanksgiving Day on this show for six years running, we've turned that idea into a musical chain of gratitude.

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Hollywood's had a complicated year, and that has made looking ahead complicated, too. NPR's Bob Mondello usually does a year-end movie preview for Thanksgiving weekend. This year, he's expanding his focus a bit.

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Loujain al-Hathloul, the jailed activist who led the charge to allow women to drive in Saudi Arabia, is due to stand trial in a special court that deals with national security crimes and terrorism cases.

Hathloul appeared before a Saudi judge on Wednesday to hear that her case was being transferred to the kingdom's Specialized Criminal Court. It was the first time the 31-year-old activist had been in court in more than a year.

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