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Join Tom Linney and Greg Lawson as they discuss with Jasmine Leyva The Invisible Vegan a 90-minute independent documentary that explores the problem of unhealthy dietary patterns in the African-American community.

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Host, Tim Hernandez talks with author, Matt Mendez about his book, Barely Missing Anything. 

Monica Lozano is a photographer born and raised right here on our border. Her work speaks about the human condition in poignant places and sometimes in difficult times. She concentrates on the theme of survival in borders around the world and is interested in capturing stories that are a true testament of courage. 

Texas Tech College of Architechture in El Paso is hosting a program lecture series featuring several leaders in the architecture field. The next one takes place on March 26th, 2019 at 6pm and features Kathryn Dean, Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate School of Architecture at Washington University.

Join Tom Linney and Greg Lawson as they discuss with Jasmine Leyva The Invisible Vegan a 90-minute independent documentary that explores the problem of unhealthy dietary patterns in the African-American community.

Dr. Keith Pannell sits down with Hydrologist Professor Jennifer Druhan to discuss the Critical Zone. Her recent work has involved integrating stable isotope systems in numerical models of reactive flow and transport for a variety of field and laboratory experiments.

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This weekend, people around the United States have been gathering to show support for the Muslim congregants who came under attack in New Zealand on Friday.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

OMAR ILYAF: (Singing in Arabic).

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A video of a stranger with a bouquet of roses walking into a New York mosque was shared thousands of times online. "An expression of sympathy for the loss of life in New Zealand," the man said, as he handed over the bouquet.

The message was clear: Muslims, you are not alone.

That message echoed in vigils and interfaith gatherings across the country over a weekend marred by a tragedy across the world that felt so close to home — an attack on two mosques in New Zealand where at least 50 people were killed as they prayed.

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The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh whether one of those convicted in the "D.C. Sniper" killings should have a lessened sentence.

Lee Boyd Malvo, 34, is currently serving a life term in prison for his role in the 2002 shootings that killed 10 people. The two months of shootings represent one of the most notable attacks to take place in the nation's capital.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The Bernie Sanders who's running for president in 2020 is not the same Bernie Sanders who ran in 2016.

Yes, he has many of the same policy positions, and many of his 2016 supporters are enthusiastically backing him again. But the Vermont independent senator is no longer the insurgent taking on a political Goliath with huge name recognition. Now, he is the candidate with high name recognition, taking on candidates who are introducing themselves to the American people again.

Sunday Politics

Mar 17, 2019

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President Trump responded to the mosque shootings in New Zealand on Friday by saying it was a terrible thing. But again, contradicting national security experts, he also minimized the threat that white nationalism poses worldwide.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Alan Krueger, who chaired the White House Council of Economic Advisers under former President Barack Obama, has died. He was 58.

The death was announced Monday by Princeton University, where Krueger was a professor.

"Alan was recognized as a true leader in his field, known and admired for both his research and teaching," the school said in a statement.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

When the Nipomo Certified Farmers' Market started in 2005, shoppers were eager to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as pastured meats and eggs, directly from farmers in central California.

But the market was small — an average of 16 vendors set up tables every Sunday — making it harder for farmers to sell enough produce to make attending worthwhile.

Two words for you: flying taxis. That's right. In the not-so-distant future, you'll open your ride-hailing app and, in addition to ground options like car, SUV, scooter or bicycle, you'll see on-demand air flight.

At least that's according to the optimists at South by Southwest, the annual tech-music-film convention in Austin, Texas.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Boeing's 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes were grounded this week. The company continues to manufacture them, but the planes are not going to airlines. And Boeing remains in limbo as the company figures out its next steps. NPR's Daniella Cheslow reports.

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In 12 days, there will be a parade to celebrate a road unifying two regions of a country torn apart by a decades-long civil war. That is, if two contractors are able to construct the road in time.

That's the premise of Dave Eggers' new novel The Parade, a slim meditation on the difficulties of global development and aid work. The story follows two men — we know them only as Four and Nine — who work for a faceless corporation, tasked with paving this highway while making as few waves as possible.

Lindy West's 2016 book Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman is, appropriately, a holler. It's a holler of triumph, of laughter, of hurt, of anger, of joy, of frustration, of defiance ... but it is a holler. West talks about life on the Internet as a feminist and a fat woman, she talks about being loved and being at peace with her body, and she talks about learning to unapologetically occupy space, both literally and figuratively.

The Bird King is set during the last days of Muslim Granada, and focuses on Fatima, a royal concubine longing for freedom, and Hassan, the royal mapmaker and Fatima's dearest friend. Hassan has a special skill: He can make beautiful, detailed maps of places he hasn't been, and more — he can chart hidden paths that bend reality and fold the distance between a person and their destination. So long as the map exists, so does the path, and the place.

We recorded the show in San Diego this week and invited skateboarding legend — and San Diego native — Tony Hawk to play our quiz. Since "tony hawk" could also refer to a fancy bird, we'll ask Hawk three questions about the Queen's birds, swiftlets, and capercaillie — the largest member of the grouse family.

Reading the graphic novel The Night Witches, about female pilots who flew for the Russians in World War II, I thought about Jane Austen. More specifically, I thought about Helena Kelly's 2017 book Jane Austen: The Secret Radical, which issued an audacious call to incorporate creativity and imagination into women's history.

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Alan Krueger, who chaired the White House Council of Economic Advisers under former President Barack Obama, has died. He was 58.

The death was announced Monday by Princeton University, where Krueger was a professor.

"Alan was recognized as a true leader in his field, known and admired for both his research and teaching," the school said in a statement.

Update From Netherlands Tram Shooting

1 hour ago

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The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh whether one of those convicted in the "D.C. Sniper" killings should have a lessened sentence.

Lee Boyd Malvo, 34, is currently serving a life term in prison for his role in the 2002 shootings that killed 10 people. The two months of shootings represent one of the most notable attacks to take place in the nation's capital.

Updated at 12:21 p.m. ET

Dutch police are searching for a man who opened fire inside a tram in the city of Utrecht, killing three people and wounding five others late Monday morning. Police say they're investigating a "possible terrorist motive" for the attack.

Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen confirmed the three deaths in a video update around 3 p.m. local time, saying that three of the wounded are facing serious injuries.

In February, Pope Francis acknowledged a longstanding dirty secret in the Roman Catholic Church — the sexual abuse of nuns by priests.

It's an issue that had long been kept under wraps, but in the #MeToo era, a #NunsToo movement has emerged, and now sexual abuse is more widely discussed.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NET-Nebraska's NPR Station. To see more, visit NET-Nebraska's NPR Station.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

New Zealand's cabinet has agreed "in principle" to tighten gun control laws, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday, promising the changes will make the country safer. "We've unified, there are simply details to work through," she said.

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