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The Weekend - Early Voting/ El Paso Matters

On this edition of the weekend hosted by Angela Kocherga: Democratic presidential campaigning in El Paso ramps up as early voting begins ahead of the Texas primary. And a new voters guide available courtesy of El Paso's new non-profit news source: El Paso Matters. CEO Bob Moore talks about voting trends in El Paso and why he started the digital news source focused on in-depth and investigative reporting.

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Dr. Pannell welcomes back Professors Eddie Castaneda from UTEP Psychology and Josiah Heyman from Anthropology to continue their discussion on breathroughs in science. Part two.

Host Daniel Chacon and co-host Amit Ghosh of Border Senses welcome Professor David Bowles from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and author of "They Call Me Guero" and " The Smoking Mirror" .

On this edition of the weekend hosted by Angela Kocherga: Democratic presidential campaigning in El Paso ramps up as early voting begins ahead of the Texas primary. And a new voters guide available courtesy of El Paso's  new non-profit news source: El Paso Matters. CEO Bob Moore talks about voting trends in El Paso and why he started the digital news source focused on in-depth and investigative reporting.

Courtesy of Anna Getty and Scott Oster

Labor: Motherhood & Art in 2020, the inaugural exhibition of the new University Art Museum at New Mexico State University, will open on February 28, 2020 and remain on view through May 28th.

This exhibition, co-curated by Museum Director Marisa Sage and artist Laurel Nakadate, aims to expand and enrich the compelling conversations regarding motherhood in today’s socio-political climate.

Johnny Byrd turns the tables on State of the Arts host Marina Monsisvais, and interviews her about her life and her involvement in the El Paso area arts scene.

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There's no dispute on whether Jesus Mesa Jr. killed 15-year-old Sergio Adrián Hernández Güereca.

He did. And there's a video of it.

In 2010 Mesa, an on-duty U.S. Border Patrol agent who was at the border in El Paso, Texas, shot Hernández at least twice — once in the face. At the time, the boy, a Mexican national, was on the southern side of the border in Ciudad Juarez.

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington on Tuesday heard arguments from Roger Stone's lawyers and federal prosecutors on the longtime Republican operative's bid for a new trial based on his allegations or juror misconduct.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is leading the pack in the Democratic presidential primary race as he and six other candidates debate in South Carolina on Tuesday.

The South Carolina primary is on Saturday, with 54 delegates up for grabs. Currently, Sanders has the most delegates, with former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in second, and former Vice President Joe Biden in third.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Federal aviation regulators issued a new round of safety fixes for Boeing's beleaguered 737 Max jetliners, mandating repairs to sections of the planes that could make them vulnerable to lightning strikes and other activity which might result in engine malfunction.

The proposed fix issued by the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday said certain panels on the planes, including the metallic layer that serves as part of the shielding for aircraft wiring, is susceptible to potential "electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes or high intensity radiated fields."

Stocks fell sharply for a second day in a row. The Dow dropped 879 points on Tuesday, after tumbling more than 1,000 points on Monday.

While the coronavirus outbreak in China appears to have peaked, investors are worried by the growing number of cases in other countries, as well as a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home.

Just last week, the S&P 500 stock index was hitting record highs. Now it's fallen more than 6% in just the last two days.

Irresponsibility — by carmaker Tesla and by a Tesla driver — contributed to a deadly crash in California in 2018, federal investigators say.

The driver appears to have been playing a game on a smartphone immediately before his semi-autonomous 2017 Model X accelerated into a concrete barrier. Distracted by his phone, he did not intervene to steer his car back toward safety and was killed in the fiery wreck.

But Tesla should have anticipated that drivers would misuse its "autopilot" feature like this and should build in more safeguards to prevent deadly crashes.

President Trump criticized remarks by Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg as "inappropriate" and said the Supreme Court justices should recuse themselves from cases involving the president.

"I just don't know how they cannot recuse themselves for anything Trump or Trump related," Trump said Tuesday in a wide-ranging news conference in New Delhi.

"What Justice Sotomayor said yesterday was highly inappropriate," Trump added. "She's trying to shame people with perhaps a different view into voting her way."

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

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And finally today, we'd like to tell you about the new revival of "West Side Story" on Broadway.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "AMERICA")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character, singing) Skyscrapers bloom in America.

Jessica Simpson is back in the news, this time in her own words.

In her new memoir, Open Book, Simpson writes honestly about her career as a pop singer, her marriage to and divorce from Nick Lachey, her stint on reality TV, and her time with John Mayer. And she reflects on becoming a fashion mogul with a billion-dollar company.

But she also opens up about sexual abuse she experienced in childhood — and addiction.

Interview Highlights

On why she decided to open up now

True story: This past Valentine's Day I was walking out of the office when I overheard a group of younger colleagues saying that they were staying in to watch the sequel to Netflix's To All the Boys I've Loved Before, called P.S. I Still Love You. Then my sister called me to say the very same thing. And I will confess, I watched it too.

Hannah Capin's most recent book, Foul is Fair, opens with a sensitive content warning and a dedication to every girl who wants revenge. I ask that readers here please keep that in mind for the length of this review, should you elect to continue.

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is leading the pack in the Democratic presidential primary race as he and six other candidates debate in South Carolina on Tuesday.

The South Carolina primary is on Saturday, with 54 delegates up for grabs. Currently, Sanders has the most delegates, with former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in second, and former Vice President Joe Biden in third.

There's no dispute on whether Jesus Mesa Jr. killed 15-year-old Sergio Adrián Hernández Güereca.

He did. And there's a video of it.

In 2010 Mesa, an on-duty U.S. Border Patrol agent who was at the border in El Paso, Texas, shot Hernández at least twice — once in the face. At the time, the boy, a Mexican national, was on the southern side of the border in Ciudad Juarez.

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington on Tuesday heard arguments from Roger Stone's lawyers and federal prosecutors on the longtime Republican operative's bid for a new trial based on his allegations or juror misconduct.

Federal aviation regulators issued a new round of safety fixes for Boeing's beleaguered 737 Max jetliners, mandating repairs to sections of the planes that could make them vulnerable to lightning strikes and other activity which might result in engine malfunction.

The proposed fix issued by the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday said certain panels on the planes, including the metallic layer that serves as part of the shielding for aircraft wiring, is susceptible to potential "electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes or high intensity radiated fields."

Stocks fell sharply for a second day in a row. The Dow dropped 879 points on Tuesday, after tumbling more than 1,000 points on Monday.

While the coronavirus outbreak in China appears to have peaked, investors are worried by the growing number of cases in other countries, as well as a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home.

Just last week, the S&P 500 stock index was hitting record highs. Now it's fallen more than 6% in just the last two days.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Coronavirus concerns triggered another steep drop on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly 900 points. That is on top of yesterday, when it tumbled more than a thousand points. The outbreak in China appears to have peaked, but investors are worried about the growing number of COVID-19 cases in other countries and a warning from U.S. health officials that the virus could hit closer to home. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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It's Fat Tuesday, and all day long, people have flocked to a tiny bakery in northwest Philadelphia. Their sights are set on a special kind of doughnut made only once a year. NPR's Neda Ulaby got in line.

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