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Jul 9, 2021

Let me begin by saying, “thank you” for your support during our last pledge drive.  Due to your generosity, KTEP raised over $50,000.  This is an indication that you not only value public radio, but remained committed to supporting us during one of the most difficult times in our nation’s history. ( Continue Reading)

Border fence at sunset
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

September 11th attack led to unprecedented border security buildup, changes in daily life

A lot has changed along the border since September 11, 2001. The attack led to the creation of the massive, cabinet-level, Department of Homeland Security and disruptions in daily life for those who cross back and forth. An estimated $330 billion has been spent ramping up border security including doubling the size of the Border Patrol, now the largest law enforcement agency in the country. There's also more technology for U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at ports of entry who...

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Border fence at sunset
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

A lot has changed along the border since September 11, 2001. The attack led to the creation of the massive, cabinet-level, Department of Homeland Security and disruptions in daily life for those who cross back and forth. An estimated $330 billion has been spent ramping up border security including doubling the size of the Border Patrol, now the largest law enforcement agency in the country. There's also more technology for U.S.

Border Patrol vehicle
Angela Kocherga / KTEP News

EL PASO -- The American Civil Liberties Union is calling for the U.S. Border Patrol make its vehicle pursuit policy public following a crash on a state road in southern New Mexico earlier this month that killed two people and injured eight others.

“Without the policy we don't have a way to kind of measure when Border Patrol is or isn't justified in undertaking these types of pursuits,” said Rebecca Sheff, senior staff attorney at the ACLU of New Mexico.

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Texas Rangers Public Integrity Cases
Texas Observer

KTEP's Angela Kocherga talks to Lise Olsen, Texas Observer senior editor and reporter, about her investigative report "Justice for Some" in which Olsen examines more than 500 cases to see how and when Texas Rangers handle public integrity cases involving elected state officials and employees. Few officials are held accountable.

Border Crossers is a large-scale performance and participatory procession involving several lightweight robotic sculptures and the trans-border communities in El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico. 

Border Crossers will perform a peaceful, symbolic, “crossing” of the U.S. - Mexico border using the combined power of art, technology and community to create a radically positive and inclusive view of border culture. The project will culminate in a series of coordinated public ‘activations’ at multiple sites in the El Paso, Texas/Juarez, Mexico area in collaboration with the Rubin Center for the Visual Arts at The University of Texas at El Paso. 

Kerry Doyle is the Executive Director of the Rubin Center for the Visual Arts.  The Rubin Center’s fall season signals the return of building connections between students and international artists that exhibit at the Rubin Center. 

The fall exhibits include a site-specific work by Japanese artist Gaku Tsutaja and Border Crossers by Chico Macmurtrie.

Host Charles Horak welcomes his colleague Felipa Solis to On Film to discuss a new format to streaming called the Short Series.

Host Louie Saenz welcomes Assistant Professor of Practice Communication and Artist, Rhonda Dore to the microphone to talk about the many interesting phases of her elaborate career.

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Migrants whom the U.S. is forcibly returning to Haiti are expressing anger, frustration and desperation when they arrive at Toussaint Louverture International Airport in Port-au-Prince.

The situation devolved into chaos Tuesday when a group of migrants rushed to try to get on a plane heading back to the United States.

Scenes of desperation on the airport tarmac

Adult migrants who had just been deported from the U.S. "caused two separate disruptions on the tarmac," a Department of Homeland Security spokesperson told NPR.

There's been national focus over the last few days on the unfolding story of Gabby Petito, the 22-year-old white woman whose death was ruled a homicide on Tuesday, nearly two weeks after she was last seen on a cross-country road trip with her now-missing boyfriend.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has announced the state's next surgeon general, who falls in line with the governor's belief that vaccine mandates during the pandemic are unnecessary.

When Winnie White Tail convened a new session of in-patient substance use treatment last month for members of the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes, she found roughly half her clients struggling with methamphetamine addiction.

"It's readily available, it's easy to get," White Tail says. She's a Cheyenne tribal member herself and runs the George Hawkins Memorial Treatment Center in Clinton, Okla.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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NPR Politics

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

President Biden is set to announce on Wednesday that the United States is buying 500 million more doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to donate to countries around the world, a pledge that will bring the total promised U.S. vaccine donations to more than 1.1 billion.

Biden will make the announcement during remarks at the start of a virtual summit aimed at boosting commitments from other nations and the private sector.

President Biden's failure to name someone to lead the Food and Drug Administration, more than 10 months after the election, has flummoxed public health experts who say it's baffling for the agency to be without a permanent leader during a national health crisis.

Congress has fewer than 10 days to pass legislation to prevent another partial government shutdown, and Democrats hope to use the deadline pressure to force Republicans to help them pass a critical suspension of the federal borrowing cap.

Republican leaders have flatly rejected that plan, leaving Congress in a familiar political standoff over spending and debt that could have serious economic consequences.

Democrats are moving ahead with a bill that would both extend current spending levels through Dec. 3 and suspend the cap on federal debt through the end of 2022.

Updated September 21, 2021 at 10:22 PM ET

Images of U.S. Border Patrol agents on horseback chasing Haitian migrants along the Rio Grande are "horrific," the White House says.

The migrants were attempting to return to a camp near the international Bridge in Del Rio, Texas, where thousands of migrants have gathered on the U.S. side of the border river. Many of them carried food they'd just bought in Mexico.

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NPR Business News

Former President Donald J. Trump has sued The New York Times and several of its reporters, along with one of its key sources - his niece, Mary - for obtaining tens of thousands of pages of his tax documents for an investigation into his finances that won a Pulitzer Prize.

The articles, published in October 2018, concluded that Trump "participated in dubious tax schemes during the 1990s, including instances of outright fraud."

A fair warning for your next trip to the liquor store: Several states across the U.S. are still experiencing booze shortages related to COVID-19, and it's unclear when supply will be able to meet demand.

Early in the pandemic, it was common to find libations low in stock after some liquor stores briefly closed amid statewide lockdowns and skyrocketing consumer demand for alcohol.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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NPR Arts News

It's been nearly 20 years since B.J. Novak first took the stage as a stand-up comic. He still remembers the date: Oct. 10, 2001, less than a month after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

It was a tough time to be telling jokes and Novak was inexperienced. His set bombed.

It took him three months to get back on stage after that show. But when he did, he booked five shows in a single week, vowing to himself that he wouldn't let a single show be a referendum on whether or not he should continue.

According to the National Weather Service, at 3:20 p.m. EDT today, the Autumnal Equinox (the moment when the length of daylight and darkness are almost perfectly equal) occurs.

From Matilda to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl's delightfully offbeat children's books have been turned into movie, TV and theater gold over the decades. On Wednesday, Netflix announced it has acquired The Roald Dahl Story Co. (RDSC), which manages all things related to the British novelist's catalogue.

Let's get this out of the way: It's uneven.

There.

Any anthology series has episodes that work better than others. Star Wars: Visions is an anthology series; some of its episodes work better than others.

Which episodes work better for you will depend entirely on what you come to the Star Wars franchise for.

Editor's note: This review uses repeated quotations from the book that contain racial slurs.

At a certain point, dark social satire bleeds into horror. That can be powerful, but it can also very easily miss its target. Percival Everett's new novel The Trees hits just the right mark. It's a racial allegory grounded in history, shrouded in mystery, and dripping with blood. An incendiary device you don't want to put down.

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Migrants whom the U.S. is forcibly returning to Haiti are expressing anger, frustration and desperation when they arrive at Toussaint Louverture International Airport in Port-au-Prince.

The situation devolved into chaos Tuesday when a group of migrants rushed to try to get on a plane heading back to the United States.

Scenes of desperation on the airport tarmac

Adult migrants who had just been deported from the U.S. "caused two separate disruptions on the tarmac," a Department of Homeland Security spokesperson told NPR.

Former President Donald J. Trump has sued The New York Times and several of its reporters, along with one of its key sources - his niece, Mary - for obtaining tens of thousands of pages of his tax documents for an investigation into his finances that won a Pulitzer Prize.

The articles, published in October 2018, concluded that Trump "participated in dubious tax schemes during the 1990s, including instances of outright fraud."

There's been national focus over the last few days on the unfolding story of Gabby Petito, the 22-year-old white woman whose death was ruled a homicide on Tuesday, nearly two weeks after she was last seen on a cross-country road trip with her now-missing boyfriend.

It's been nearly 20 years since B.J. Novak first took the stage as a stand-up comic. He still remembers the date: Oct. 10, 2001, less than a month after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

It was a tough time to be telling jokes and Novak was inexperienced. His set bombed.

It took him three months to get back on stage after that show. But when he did, he booked five shows in a single week, vowing to himself that he wouldn't let a single show be a referendum on whether or not he should continue.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has announced the state's next surgeon general, who falls in line with the governor's belief that vaccine mandates during the pandemic are unnecessary.

According to the National Weather Service, at 3:20 p.m. EDT today, the Autumnal Equinox (the moment when the length of daylight and darkness are almost perfectly equal) occurs.

When Winnie White Tail convened a new session of in-patient substance use treatment last month for members of the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes, she found roughly half her clients struggling with methamphetamine addiction.

"It's readily available, it's easy to get," White Tail says. She's a Cheyenne tribal member herself and runs the George Hawkins Memorial Treatment Center in Clinton, Okla.

A fair warning for your next trip to the liquor store: Several states across the U.S. are still experiencing booze shortages related to COVID-19, and it's unclear when supply will be able to meet demand.

Early in the pandemic, it was common to find libations low in stock after some liquor stores briefly closed amid statewide lockdowns and skyrocketing consumer demand for alcohol.

Afghanistan's reclusive new leaders, the Taliban, are asking for a chance to address the United Nations General Assembly, but they are unlikely to get their wish — at least not in the current session.

From Matilda to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl's delightfully offbeat children's books have been turned into movie, TV and theater gold over the decades. On Wednesday, Netflix announced it has acquired The Roald Dahl Story Co. (RDSC), which manages all things related to the British novelist's catalogue.

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