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WORDS ON A WIRE: Thelma T. Reyna

Host, Daniel Chacón interview with Thelma T. Reyna about her new book, Reading Tea Leaves After Trump. And Daniel defines what makes a writer write.

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Latest from KTEP

The Weekend - Borderzine

11 hours ago

Student journalists at the University of Texas at El Paso discuss reporting for Borderzine, a multimedia news magazine about borderland life. Nicole Madrid, Yazmin Herrera and Aaron Martinez talk about the wide range of issues they reported this semester, the stories behind the stories, and why its important to go beyond crisis coverage of border. Learn more about the students who are part of an award-winning training program for young journalists at UTEP on this edition of The Weekend hosted by Angela Kocherga.

Perspectives - Christopher Fulton

May 14, 2019

Host Louie Saenz sits down with Christopher Fulton. author of The Inheritance: Poisoned Fruit of JFK’s Assassination When Christopher Fulton buys a gold Cartier watch that belonged to JFK and was part of the original assassination materials, it sets in motion something he never saw coming. A real page-turner. This book and the information in it is simply explosive.

GOOD TO GROW - Mothers Day special

May 14, 2019

Denise and Jan celebrate Mother's Day weekend with special ideas and botanical surprises for Mom. 

SCIENCE STUDIO - Dr. Robert Figueroa

May 13, 2019

Dr. Pannell welcomes Dr. Robert Figueroa of Oregon State University co -author of Science and other cultures for a compelling talk on Environmental justice, DDT, the philosophy of science and many other topics.

Host, Daniel Chacón interviews Lee Herrick about his third book, Scar and Flower. 

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Electrical transmission lines owned and operated by utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) caused last fall's Camp Fire, the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history, state fire investigators said Wednesday.

The fire in Northern California's Butte County burned more than 150,000 acres and killed 85 people.

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The 2020 Democratic presidential field keeps growing and growing. Twenty-two people are now angling for the Oval Office. Over the next several weeks, we're going to spend time getting to know some of those candidates better with help from the NPR Politics Podcast team. The team is working with New Hampshire Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio to interview candidates out on the campaign trail.

NPR's Scott Detrow kicks off the series with New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, and he's here in the studio to tell us how it went. Hey there, Scott.

Audie Cornish talks with Vali Nasr, Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, who says tensions between the U.S. and Iran were manufactured by the Trump administration.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The 2020 Democratic presidential field keeps growing and growing. Twenty-two people are now angling for the Oval Office. Over the next several weeks, we're going to spend time getting to know some of those candidates better with help from the NPR Politics Podcast team. The team is working with New Hampshire Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio to interview candidates out on the campaign trail.

NPR's Scott Detrow kicks off the series with New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, and he's here in the studio to tell us how it went. Hey there, Scott.

Following a six month investigation, Cal Fire has found PG&E, the state's largest utility, responsible for igniting 2018's Camp Fire, the deadliest and most destructive in state history.

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NPR Politics

Updated at 4:14 p.m. ET

President Trump is set to unveil an immigration plan that would vastly change who is allowed into the United States.

Trump will present the plan in a speech from the White House Rose Garden Thursday afternoon.

The new plan would focus on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment-skill-based immigration.

But overall, the number of green cards issued under this plan would not change, and there would be no reduction in net immigration.

A series of internal National Rifle Association documents leaked online over the weekend, detailing lavish six-figure spending on clothing and travel expenses for CEO Wayne LaPierre.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The U.S. military is saying that American forces in Iraq could face, quote, "credible and possibly imminent threats," unquote, from Iranian-backed militias.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The House Intelligence Committee is embroiled in a fight with the Trump administration, and the president's son, Donald Trump Jr., has now agreed to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

At a rally on Capitol Hill organized by black female leaders in support of Ilhan Omar, the embattled Democratic congresswoman addressed the crowd.

"They cannot stand that a refugee, a black woman, an immigrant, a Muslim shows up in Congress thinking she's equal to them," she said, referencing President Trump, members of the Republican Party and even members of her own party.

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NPR Business News

Much like customers anticipate the arrival of an Uber, watching as the tiny image of a car winds its way across a map on a phone, Uber drivers say they have also been anticipating (and predicting) the National Labor Relations Board's decision denying them recognition as employees.

The NLRB released the advisory memo on Tuesday, nearly a month after it was originally issued. It concludes that Uber drivers are independent contractors and not employees — a classification that means they have no right to form a union or bargain collectively.

If the government's new plan works, the number of robocalls you receive may go down in the near future.

The Federal Communications Commission is proposing to push phone companies to "block unwanted calls to their customers by default."

If enacted, the proposal would not compel phone companies to impose default call-blocks. But it would shield telecom providers from legal liability for blocking certain calls.

The Trump administration is preparing to add tariffs — or taxes — on virtually everything the U.S. buys from China. But the president offered reassurance that in some cases, waivers will be granted, so Chinese goods can be imported tax-free.

The administration has offered similar waivers from its steel and aluminum tariffs, putting the Commerce Department in the awkward position of literally picking winners and losers.

The Trump administration's trade war with China continues to roil markets and draw headlines. But that's not the only trade tension in town.

For about a year, the White House has been weighing the possibility of imposing tariffs or quotas on cars and car parts imported from close allies in Europe and Japan.

The auto industry is united in opposition to the tariffs. But carmakers and auto suppliers may have to keep waiting to find out whether their pleas have been heard.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The 2020 Democratic presidential field keeps growing and growing. Twenty-two people are now angling for the Oval Office. Over the next several weeks, we're going to spend time getting to know some of those candidates better with help from the NPR Politics Podcast team. The team is working with New Hampshire Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio to interview candidates out on the campaign trail.

NPR's Scott Detrow kicks off the series with New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, and he's here in the studio to tell us how it went. Hey there, Scott.

The hit TV show The Big Bang Theory is signing off after a 12 season run – and the show's writers and creators aren't quite ready to say goodbye. For more than a decade, the writers have pitched storylines and traded jabs from their creative space at Warner Bros. studios.

On their long conference table you'll find Star Wars toys, e-mail about the structure of DNA, and the collected work of physicist Richard Feynman. There are Star Trek screensavers on the TV monitors.

Jostein Gaarder's Sophie's World was one of the most memorable books I read in my early teens. The brilliance of that book came from Gaarder's ability to make complicated concepts easier for young minds to digest. Adam Gopnik's A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism does the same thing with liberalism — but for politically engaged adults.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. Howard Stern described my interview with him as exhausting. We talked a long time because there was so much to talk about - too much to fit in one show. Yesterday we heard Part 1. Today we have Part 2 of my interview with Howard Stern. The occasion for the interview is the publication of his new book collecting some of his favorite interviews from his Sirius XM radio show. The book is called "Howard Stern Comes Again." Let's pick up where we left off yesterday.

So we were talking about...

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. We're going to listen back to the interview I was lucky enough to record with Doris Day, who stayed out of the public eye for decades after giving up her movie career. She died Monday at the age of 97. As film critic Carrie Rickey wrote in her obituary for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Doris Day was beloved for her popular songs, films and wholesomeness. It's hard to name another figure whose sunny persona was so at odds with her stormy life.

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In The Twilight War, government historian David Crist outlines the secret history of America's 30-year conflict with Iran. The book, based on interviews with hundreds of officials as well as classified military archives, details how the covert war has spanned five American presidential terms and repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare.

Crist tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that there have been several incidents that have almost resulted in battle over the past 30 years.

For bartenders, the words "last call" have a hidden meaning: It won't be long before they're enjoying a drink of their own. And after hours of making tonics, flips and fizzes, what does a bartender drink? Often, the answer is short and simple: Fernet.

In a world of citrusy, sugary drinks that can all taste alike, Fernet Branca stands alone. Depending on how your palate responds, the Italian digestif can be called everything from refreshingly bold to an acquired taste to cough syrup that's gone bad.

Experimental fiction in North America began with a genius of a doyen in Paris: Gertrude Stein, whose aesthetic assertion that writers shape and form and reform the medium of language the way sculptors work with stone, painters work with light and shape and composers work with sound, changed Hemingway forever and, thus, changed the nature of the American short story — or the American art story, at least.

Last month we asked you, our audience, to nominate titles for a top-100 list of the best young adult — YA — fiction ever written. Thousands of you sent in nominations. We've tabulated those suggestions and, with the help of an expert panel, narrowed the list to the 235 finalists you see below.

When William Bolcom's opera A View from the Bridge premiered in Chicago in 1999, one critic described it as "Brooklyn verismo," invoking the emotive style popularized by Italian composers such as Puccini. And that pretty much hits the nail on the head.

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