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The Weekend - Dr. Diana Natalicio

Host Louie Saenz sits down with UTEP President Dr. Diana Natalicio for a very personal look at her life growing up in St. Louis and what brought her to El Paso, Texas.

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Host Louie Saenz sits down with Nigel Hamilton an award-winning British-born biographer, academic, and broadcaster, whose works have been translated into sixteen languages. In the United States, he is known primarily for his best-selling[1] work on the young John F. KennedyJFK: Reckless Youth, which was made into an ABC miniseries and the final installment of the biographer’s significant study of Franklin Roosevelt’s sine qua non leadership in World War II. 

Denise, Jan and John discuss how to maintain your yard this summer and how to prepare for the hot weather ahead.

Tom, Greg and Liz of ACT Radio interview David Simom author of Meatonomics: How the Rigged Economics of Meat and Dairy Make You Consume Too Much- and How to Eat Better, Live Longer, and Spend Smarter,” shines a light on the unsettling world of factory farming in America and how our own government contributes to it.

Originally Broadcast on March 24, 2019. Host, Tim Hernandez talks with poet, Ire'ne Lara Silva about her new book of poetry, Cuicacalli / House of Song.

 Regular On Film guest, Oscar Garza, dropped by the studio to talk with guest host, Kyle Alvarado. The two discussed two new thrilling films - The Perfection and Cam. Both films delve into voyeurism, the macabre, and ethical imperatives. Both titles are currently streaming on Netflix. 

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Advocacy groups that sued to block the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to delay issuing a ruling on the question's fate.

A day after TV personality Jon Stewart blasted lawmakers for their inaction, the House Judiciary Committee voted unanimously Wednesday to extend the compensation fund for police, firefighters and other first responders to the Sept. 11 attack sites.

The surge of Central American migrants crossing into the U.S. isn't just taxing border agents and the nation's immigration system — it's straining interior checkpoints like one on Highway 281 in Texas.

An hour's drive north of the U.S.-Mexico border, the new and expanded Falfurrias checkpoint is on a major route for traffickers shepherding people or drugs north.

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Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

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President Trump says he might accept dirt from another country on his potential Democratic rivals if offered, raising new questions and concerns about foreign influence on American elections.

"It's not an interference, they have information — I think I'd take it," Trump said. "If I thought there was something wrong, I'd go maybe to the FBI — if I thought there was something wrong."

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Partisan divisions have been deepening on Capitol Hill for years. One longstanding exception, though, has been the House Armed Services Committee. For 58 years straight, it has passed a big annual defense policy bill with broad bipartisan support. But as that panel met today to hammer out this year's National Defense Authorization bill, it was a very different picture. NPR's David Welna has our story.

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ADAM SMITH: All right, the committee will come to order. Welcome all.

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Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

From fairs to auctions to gilded galas, the contemporary art market is booming.

It’s also the financial world’s best kept secret for saving billions in taxes.

Carol Burgos is worried her neighbors think she is bringing the neighborhood down.

She lives in a mobile home park in a woodsy part of Columbia County, N.Y, just off a two-lane highway. The homes have neat yards and American flags. On a spring Saturday, some neighbors are out holding yard sales, with knickknacks spread out on folding tables. Others are out doing yardwork.

Burgos' lawn is unruly and overgrown.

"How bad do I feel when these little old ladies are mowing their lawn and I can't because I'm in so much pain?" she says.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Former Stanford University sailing coach John Vandemoer will not face prison time after pleading guilty to accepting bribes as part of a sweeping college admissions scandal that grabbed national headlines and shocked the U.S. higher education system.

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In 1961, when President John F. Kennedy announced a goal of "landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth" before the end of the decade, the mission seemed all but impossible.

"[The U.S.] didn't have a spaceship that could fly to the moon," journalist Charles Fishman notes. "We didn't have a rocket that could launch to the moon. We didn't have a computer small enough or powerful enough to do the navigation necessary to get people to the moon. We didn't have space food."

The role William S. Burroughs played in shaping literature is well known. But his influence on rock and roll hasn't been as well-documented.

"No matter which way we turned the girl, she didn't have a face."

Lonnie Bunch III's interest in the past began with an incomplete story. His grandfather, a sharecropper-turned-dentist, would read history books to him, and Bunch would wonder why the pictures of black children contained little detail — why the captions simply read "unknown children" or "anonymous."

On average, every 30 seconds someone in the world buys a copy of The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Maybe it's for a grandchild, an expectant parent or a dear friend's new baby. Nearly 50 million copies have been sold since the classic picture book was first published in 1969, and it has been translated into over 62 languages.

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For bartenders, the words "last call" have a hidden meaning: It won't be long before they're enjoying a drink of their own. And after hours of making tonics, flips and fizzes, what does a bartender drink? Often, the answer is short and simple: Fernet.

In a world of citrusy, sugary drinks that can all taste alike, Fernet Branca stands alone. Depending on how your palate responds, the Italian digestif can be called everything from refreshingly bold to an acquired taste to cough syrup that's gone bad.

Experimental fiction in North America began with a genius of a doyen in Paris: Gertrude Stein, whose aesthetic assertion that writers shape and form and reform the medium of language the way sculptors work with stone, painters work with light and shape and composers work with sound, changed Hemingway forever and, thus, changed the nature of the American short story — or the American art story, at least.

Last month we asked you, our audience, to nominate titles for a top-100 list of the best young adult — YA — fiction ever written. Thousands of you sent in nominations. We've tabulated those suggestions and, with the help of an expert panel, narrowed the list to the 235 finalists you see below.

When William Bolcom's opera A View from the Bridge premiered in Chicago in 1999, one critic described it as "Brooklyn verismo," invoking the emotive style popularized by Italian composers such as Puccini. And that pretty much hits the nail on the head.

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