KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Arts

Arts and culture

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

NPR National Poetry Month: Nikky Finney

9 hours ago

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

One final thought - if you are anything like me, you've probably been frantically exchanging messages with friends and family and memes and also...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CORONAVIRUS RHAPSODY")

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

As people adjust to this new lockdown normal, they're also trying to hang on to those moments that bring joy and comfort. And so people are celebrating life's big moments, with some adjustments.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Cameron Esposito couldn't have known her memoir Save Yourself would come out in the midst of a global pandemic. But her aptly titled book includes observations that feel eerily pertinent to this unsettling time.

"Humans are scared out of our minds and want to be saved," she writes. " We want to know why we are here, what we are supposed to do, and how to protect ourselves."

Esposito is a comic, writer and actor. When she titled her book, she had in mind queer kids, struggling to understand themselves — as she once did growing up in a strict Catholic household.

The sun shines as Felix Quintana cruises through South Central Los Angeles. He's always been inspired by what he sees out of his car window, from the strip malls to the street vendors. "I love the hustle," he says. "The hand-painted signs, the swap meets, the people making money washing windshields."

But those moments can fly by. And his ongoing series of cyanotypes make us pause on the often overlooked Angelenos who work and live in the less glitzy, more gritty neighborhoods of LA County.

Hippos can get hungry. Very hungry. So when zoos shut their doors to the public because of the coronavirus, zookeepers keep showing up to work to make sure everyone is fed.

Jenna Wingate feeds Fiona, the Cincinnati Zoo's 3-year-old, 1,300-pound hippo. Fiona was born premature, and Wingate has been looking after her since two hours after she was born.

In Berlin, reminders of the city's violent past are everywhere. Somber monuments, museums, stumbling stones and plaques dot nearly every block. "Germany is seen around the world as a model for how a country can face its past — and it has done that in a way few countries have," says journalist James Angelos.

Tim Gunn is known for his style, his sharp opinions, his catch phrase – "Make it work!" – and for being impeccably dressed. He joins us this week by phone from his home, where he's probably wearing perfectly creased sweatpants.

Gunn's new Amazon show is called Making the Cut, so we've invited him to play a game called "Making the putt!" Three questions about golf.

Click the audio link above to find out how he does.

Let's ask Samantha Irby to introduce herself, with a passage from her new book, Wow, No Thank You: "I occasionally write jokes on the Internet for free because I'm the last person on Earth who still has a blog," she reads.

"Accuracy above all things. You will never remember the great if you do not remember the small."

What details are truly small? Who says they are? Ask yourself as you read The Empress of Salt and Fortune.

COVID-19 is keeping most of us inside, isolated from others, for days on end.

For kids (and parents!), school work can only extend so far into the day. Earlier, the NPR Arts team offered some of our favorite distractions when we are feeling worried. Now we have some heart-felt recommendations for how to enjoy the rest of the time you have in close-quarters with your family.

Adventure Time

Our Very First Work From Home Episode

Mar 27, 2020

Ophira and Jonathan chat about their lives during quarantine in this all-new, never been done, work from home episode from Ask Me Another.

Heard on Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode.

Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode

Mar 27, 2020

Emily Nussbaum has acted as The New Yorker's television critic since 2011, primarily contributing to the magazine's "On Television" columns.

Wrecking Ball Of Confusion

Mar 27, 2020

During this work-at-home audio quiz about combining song titles, the proceedings are continually interrupted by the participants' children.

Heard on Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode.

Lost In Translation

Mar 27, 2020

Songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez (Frozen, Coco) play a game about very specific, foreign words without English equivalents.

Heard on Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode.

Degrees of Insanity

Mar 27, 2020

Ophira and Jonathan take contestants John Hodgman and Jackie Kashian back to school in this word game about college degrees.

Heard on Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode.

Brew Or False

Mar 27, 2020

Prost! Comedians John Hodgman (Judge John Hodgman, I, Podius) and Jackie Kashian (The Dork Forest, The Jackie and Laurie Show) have a round of beer-centric trivia.

Heard on Emily Nussbaum: The Watch From Home Episode.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. Today we have Part II of our tribute to Stephen Sondheim, who turned 90 last Sunday. We made it a two-parter because we're big fans and because listening to Sondheim and his music seems like a great way to take a break and boost our spirits. Sondheim fans like me always wonder, how did he write those brilliant lyrics? He provided a lot of answers in his book "Finishing The Hat," which collects his lyrics from 1954 to '81 and tells the stories behind the songs.

You've seen it all over your Twitter feed. Half your friends are probably playing it — yes, Nintendo's Animal Crossing is the video game of the moment, and it is a great way to keep yourself soothed and distracted.

David Biello
Elizabeth Zeeuw / TED

About The Episode

Music artist Alicia Keys, a 15-time Grammy winner, has a new self-titled album coming out — her seventh.

She also has written a forthcoming book, More Myself, that she prefers to call a "journey" rather than a memoir.

Keys spoke to NPR in February — an interview being aired for the first time now — about her latest projects.

Her book explores her arrival into adulthood while in the spotlight, and how she learned to be herself — and that it was OK to be herself.

With mass closings of theaters and museums, cancellations or postponements of exhibitions, concerts, dance performances and more, the arts industry is in "economic freefall" due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the advocacy group Americans For The Arts.

Note: Vivarium will be released on various video-on-demand and streaming services on Friday, March 27.

Note: Resistance will be released on video-on-demand and streaming services on Friday, March 26.

Copyright 2020 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Concerns over the coronavirus have shuttered public and school libraries around the world, depriving their regular patrons of free access to the Internet, shelter and, of course, books — just when many of them could use them the most.

National Book Award nominee Samantha Mabry returns with a ghostly tale of four Latinx sisters – three of them living, one dead.

The Torres sisters are a charismatic but prickly bunch, always straining against their widower father's smothering grip and trying to figure out how to run towards something better. But when Ana, the eldest, falls to her death trying to sneak out her bedroom window one night, it shatters her sisters and leaves them alone with their regrets and fears.

In these unsettled, unsettling times, some of us look to things like horror movies and dystopian novels as a means to keep things in perspective. Things are bad, these people think, as they delight in characters meeting various grisly ends, or huddling around barrel-fires in fishnet stockings and fingerless gloves, but they're not this bad.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Pages