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A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Many employers are looking to get people back into the office. Some are making it mandatory, such as law firm AZA in Houston. Partner John Zavitsanos says working in the office yields the best results when trying a complicated case.

A passenger aboard a Frontier Airlines flight has been charged with three counts of battery. The passenger is accused of inappropriately touching two female flight attendants and punching a male attendant on Saturday. The flight crew then restrained the unruly passenger and used tape to ensure he stayed seated for the remainder of the flight.

The health care company One Medical, under government scrutiny for allegedly using vaccine distribution to increase its bottom line, is facing a new challenge from within: employees who accuse the company of placing profits over patients.

Dozens of One Medical employees are trying to unionize as a response to what they say has been mismanagement of the organization's COVID-19 response, poor working conditions for staff and, they allege, a declining focus on patients.

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Gwynne Hogan of our member station WNYC joins us. Good morning.

GWYNNE HOGAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: So how much evidence backs up these accusations by the state attorney general?

Spirit and American Airlines canceled hundreds of their flights on Tuesday, exasperating passengers in airports throughout the country, and in some cases, leaving them stranded.

Half of Spirit's Tuesday flights were canceled: a total of 347 flights, according to the Associated Press. By comparison, American Airlines had canceled around 300 flights — about 10% of the day's total, by mid-afternoon on Tuesday.

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If you're Jeff Bezos, you're not going to have some random dude manage your money and hope for the best. You're not gonna open up a Robinhood account and risk it all on meme stocks like GameStop. You're going to hire the type of investor who has a Ph.D. in mathematics and drives a Bugatti, a go-getter who wakes up with a turmeric latte and pores over satellite images of factories in Asia to predict the earnings of some 3D-printing company most of us have never heard of. We're talking about the best of the best in finance.

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As the U.S. economy continues to recover from the pandemic, prices have been creeping up on everything from groceries to used cars to airline tickets. Here's President Biden speaking to this very point a couple of weeks ago.

Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama may get a second chance to vote on whether to form the company's first unionized warehouse in the United States.

A federal labor official has found that Amazon's anti-union tactics tainted this spring's election sufficiently to scrap its results, according to the union that sought to represent the workers. The official is recommending a do-over of the unionization vote, the union said in a release.

Angela McNamara's first hint that her Facebook account had been hacked was an early-morning email warning that someone was trying to log into her account.

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All the recent news of the latest covid surge raises a question - how much trouble are we in this time?

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Landlords across much of the country can now evict tenants who have fallen behind on their rent. That's because a federal ban on evictions expired over the weekend.

"It's devastating," said Safiya Kitwana, a single mom with two teenagers living in DeKalb County, Ga., who lost her job during the pandemic. Like 7 million other Americans, Kitwana has fallen behind on rent.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Across the country, many DoorDash drivers have stopped dashing to your door.

They've logged off the app for the day as part of a strike organized on social media against the food delivery service, demanding tip transparency and higher pay.

Here's why.

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It's been difficult to make sense of all of the varying guidance and mandates on masking and vaccines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states and local governments. But in Kansas, where cases are rising, it is also difficult to know who has the power to call the shots since Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly's executive authority remains in legal limbo.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

For a while there, it seemed like things were finally heading back to normal. Now, not so much.

In the span of just a week, plans for a September return to the office have been pushed back. Mask mandates have made a comeback. And a growing number of employers, including the federal government, are laying down the line on vaccines.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Millions of Americans have started investing during the pandemic. And while the market has started to get a bit wobbly lately, stocks are still near all-time highs. So now is actually a really good time for people new to the world of investing to figure out how to get their ducks in a row and their investments set up in a smart way for whatever the future may bring.

If you're an everyday investor trying to sift through Reddit threads and YouTube tutorials, this is for you. Here are a few common mistakes to avoid and some actionable tips to get you on your own investing path.

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