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Democrats in Washington are divided.

You've no doubt read and heard news reports that detail the recent infighting, as headline writers for weeks have been digging to find synonyms for discord, disarray, dissent and disagreement.

The party is portrayed as split, on the outs and at odds.

And in the game of Washington power politics, party unity matters. Disunity kills.

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There always seems to be someone testing the presidential waters in Iowa.

Over the summer, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem and former Vice President Mike Pence headlined an event for a prominent evangelical Christian group.

At a fundraiser, Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton went viral doing pushups with his Iowa colleague, Chuck Grassley.

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down a lower federal court ruling that temporarily blocked Texas from enforcing its ban on abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

The Department of Justice now has until Oct. 12 to reply to the ruling, and the ban remains in effect until then.

Before a lower court intervened, Texas was allowed to keep its abortion law, Senate Bill 8, in effect for roughly five weeks. In that time, providers say they were forced to turn away hundreds of people seeking abortions.

Updated October 9, 2021 at 4:50 PM ET

The U.S. Census Bureau is extending a final round of door knocking into early 2022 for a key survey that is expected to help determine the accuracy of last year's national head count, NPR has learned.

Updated October 8, 2021 at 1:06 PM ET

The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., a hangout for Republican allies of former President Donald Trump during his term at the White House, was a big money loser for Trump's company, according to a cache of documents released by congressional Democrats on Friday.

How big? The company incurred over $70 million in net losses, according to the House Oversight Committee.

Senior members of the Biden administration will meet with their Mexican counterparts in Mexico City on Friday to discuss overhauling an existing security arrangement between the two nations.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken will lead high-level security discussions between the two nations.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Over the coming year, about 100,000 people from Afghanistan will start new lives in the United States: new beginnings that requires a mind-boggling amount of coordination between federal, state and private organizations.

At the White House, Jack Markell, a former Delaware governor, has the responsibility of trying to make this go as smoothly as possible.

Maybe you've noticed the birthday card that arrived belatedly or the check in the mail that didn't pay your credit card quite on time. It's not your imagination. The mail has definitely gotten less speedy.

The U.S. Postal Service began slowing deliveries of first-class mail nationwide on Oct. 1.

Attorneys general in 19 states and the District of Columbia filed an administrative complaint Thursday seeking to block U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's 10-year budget-cutting plan that includes slower deliveries, more expensive mailing rates and reduced hours for post offices.

Updated October 8, 2021 at 3:23 PM ET

President Biden restored the boundaries of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante monuments in southern Utah and added protections for the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts national monuments on Friday.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated October 8, 2021 at 3:21 PM ET

The White House is authorizing the National Archives to share a set of documents with the Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday.

An interim report from the Senate Judiciary Committee provides the most detailed look yet at former President Donald Trump's attempts to enlist the Justice Department in his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

The report from the panel's Democratic majority documents the chaotic final weeks of Trump's presidency following his loss to Joe Biden, and how Trump tried to force Justice Department officials to help him keep his grip on power.

Updated October 7, 2021 at 8:36 PM ET

The Senate has passed a bill to increase the federal debt ceiling, after weeks of tense cross-aisle negotiations regarding the looming threat of the country defaulting on its debt.

The legislation was approved Thursday night along party lines, with a simple majority. An earlier procedural vote required Republicans to get to 60 votes. It got 61. House approval is still needed.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Congress is edging closer to a solution on the debt limit, but solution is honestly probably generous because they're just buying time to avoid defaulting on America's debts.

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The anti-abortion law in Texas has been put on hold, but it is unclear if people seeking abortions will actually be able to get them.

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By next month Los Angeles will require residents and visitors to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccine in order to eat, drink, or shop in indoor establishments across the city.

Under this mandate, eligible patrons will need to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination to enter restaurants, bars, coffee shops, stores, gyms, spas or salons. People attending large, outdoor events will also need to show evidence of either vaccination or proof of a negative COVID-19 test to attend the event.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

As moderate and progressive Democrats negotiate where to cut down a broad $3.5 trillion bill containing most of President Biden's domestic priorities, he is talking more and more about incremental progress.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 10:50 PM ET

A federal judge has blocked enforcement of Texas' controversial new abortion law, granting an emergency request from the Justice Department.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 8:25 PM ET

The White House is allocating an additional $1 billion to purchase millions of rapid at-home tests for COVID-19, in response to an ongoing national shortage of these tests. The announcement was made by White House COVID-19 response coordinator Jeffrey Zients at a briefing on Wednesday.

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