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Over the coming year, about 100,000 people from Afghanistan will start new lives in the United States: new beginnings that requires a mind-boggling amount of coordination between federal, state and private organizations.

At the White House, Jack Markell, a former Delaware governor, has the responsibility of trying to make this go as smoothly as possible.

Maybe you've noticed the birthday card that arrived belatedly or the check in the mail that didn't pay your credit card quite on time. It's not your imagination. The mail has definitely gotten less speedy.

The U.S. Postal Service began slowing deliveries of first-class mail nationwide on Oct. 1.

Attorneys general in 19 states and the District of Columbia filed an administrative complaint Thursday seeking to block U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's 10-year budget-cutting plan that includes slower deliveries, more expensive mailing rates and reduced hours for post offices.

Updated October 8, 2021 at 3:23 PM ET

President Biden restored the boundaries of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante monuments in southern Utah and added protections for the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts national monuments on Friday.

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Updated October 8, 2021 at 3:21 PM ET

The White House is authorizing the National Archives to share a set of documents with the Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday.

An interim report from the Senate Judiciary Committee provides the most detailed look yet at former President Donald Trump's attempts to enlist the Justice Department in his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

The report from the panel's Democratic majority documents the chaotic final weeks of Trump's presidency following his loss to Joe Biden, and how Trump tried to force Justice Department officials to help him keep his grip on power.

Updated October 7, 2021 at 8:36 PM ET

The Senate has passed a bill to increase the federal debt ceiling, after weeks of tense cross-aisle negotiations regarding the looming threat of the country defaulting on its debt.

The legislation was approved Thursday night along party lines, with a simple majority. An earlier procedural vote required Republicans to get to 60 votes. It got 61. House approval is still needed.

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Congress is edging closer to a solution on the debt limit, but solution is honestly probably generous because they're just buying time to avoid defaulting on America's debts.

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The anti-abortion law in Texas has been put on hold, but it is unclear if people seeking abortions will actually be able to get them.

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By next month Los Angeles will require residents and visitors to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccine in order to eat, drink, or shop in indoor establishments across the city.

Under this mandate, eligible patrons will need to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination to enter restaurants, bars, coffee shops, stores, gyms, spas or salons. People attending large, outdoor events will also need to show evidence of either vaccination or proof of a negative COVID-19 test to attend the event.

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As moderate and progressive Democrats negotiate where to cut down a broad $3.5 trillion bill containing most of President Biden's domestic priorities, he is talking more and more about incremental progress.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 10:50 PM ET

A federal judge has blocked enforcement of Texas' controversial new abortion law, granting an emergency request from the Justice Department.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 8:25 PM ET

The White House is allocating an additional $1 billion to purchase millions of rapid at-home tests for COVID-19, in response to an ongoing national shortage of these tests. The announcement was made by White House COVID-19 response coordinator Jeffrey Zients at a briefing on Wednesday.

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I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles with a story today about a long-running drama, granted a somewhat wonky drama that's been haunting Capitol Hill for weeks now.

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Former President Donald Trump continued to champion the lie that he was unfairly stripped of office in the White House race against President Biden, saying Wednesday that the "real insurrection" happened on Election Day 2020.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 6:25 PM ET

Senate leaders are working to finalize a deal to avoid the immediate threat of federal default by punting a political battle to December.

Democrats say they are willing to accept an offer from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for a short-term lift of the debt limit. But they say they remain unwilling to accept a related demand to use McConnell's preferred procedure to pass a longer suspension of the borrowing cap.

Black residents in the rural South are nearly twice as likely as their white counterparts to lack home internet access, according to a new study from the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 3:13 PM ET

At the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices sharply questioned the federal government's lawyer about the refusal to allow a Guantanamo Bay detainee to testify about his own torture at a so-called CIA black site in Poland.

The unexpectedly tense argument over torture in the aftermath of the 9/11 attack came in the case of Abu Zubaydah, a Guantanamo detainee who has never been charged with a crime, though he has been in U.S. custody for 20 years.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a case testing the limits of public disclosure about the CIA's secret torture program after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The central issue of the case concerns whether a detainee at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, who has never been charged with a crime can subpoena testimony from the CIA contractors who supervised his torture.

Abu Zubaydah was the first prisoner held by the CIA to undergo extensive torture.

A split federal appeals court in California ruled that a state law banning private detention facilities can't be enforced because it will likely intrude on the immigration authority held by the federal government.

The 2-1 decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit also reverses an earlier trial court's dismissal of prior challenges to California's AB 32.

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