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A massive investigation from more than 600 journalists across the globe sheds new light into the shadowy world of offshore banking and the high-powered elites who use the system to their benefit.

The exposé, dubbed the "Pandora Papers," shows how the world's wealthy hide their money and assets from authorities, their creditors and the public by using a network of lawyers and financial institutions that promise secrecy.

As Democrats in Congress look to break the stalemate in negotiations over sweeping changes to the social safety net and investments in climate, the chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus said Sunday her members would not accept a $1.5 trillion price tag.

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Before boarding Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House on Saturday morning, President Joe Biden told reporters that a lot has been going on recently, such as "hurricanes and floods," which is why he says he hasn't been promoting legislation that covers the bulk of his domestic agenda.

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Thousands of rallygoers in hundreds of cities across the country are gathering Saturday for the 5th Women's March, focusing on abortion justice.

The rally in the national's capital is hosting roughly 5,000 people in and around Freedom Plaza, the group says. Marches are also taking place in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.

Updated October 2, 2021 at 2:11 PM ET

The Senate on Saturday approved a temporary extension to fund the federal highway program. The move ends temporary furloughs for 3,700 employees at the Department of Transportation.

The furloughs kicked in Friday after the House of Representatives failed to pass the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill.

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Furious negotiations in Washington, D.C., this weekend, and you can think of furious as being both intense and angry - and that's just the Democrats.

Ron Elving joins us. Ron, thanks so much for being with us.

Abortion-rights advocates are protesting in cities across the U.S. on Saturday, with their movement feeling deeply uneasy about what comes next after Texas enacted the nation's most restrictive abortion law, and with the conservative Supreme Court possibly ruling on the future of Roe v. Wade during its next term, which starts Monday.

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A federal judge is weighing arguments on the Justice Department's emergency request to block Texas' controversial new abortion law.

Department attorneys and lawyers for the state of Texas made their cases on Friday at a virtual hearing before Judge Robert Pitman of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas. At stake is the ability of women in the country's second-largest state to get an abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy, a time before which many people don't realize they're pregnant.

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has tested positive for COVID-19 in what appears to be a breakthrough infection, the court said in a statement Friday.

"On Thursday evening, Justice Kavanaugh was informed that he had tested positive for Covid-19," the statement said. "He has no symptoms and has been fully vaccinated since January."

His wife and daughters tested negative, it added.

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All right. With us now is Congressman Fred Upton of Michigan. He's a Republican who supports the bipartisan infrastructure bill. He is also a member of the Problem Solvers Caucus. Good morning, Congressman Upton.

FRED UPTON: Well, good morning to you.

The governors of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin are joining forces to build a new network for charging electric vehicles. The bipartisan plan aims to improve the region's economy while also reducing toxic emissions from cars and trucks.

The new plan is called REV Midwest — the Regional Electric Vehicle Midwest Coalition. In addition to creating jobs and improving public health, its backers say it will help the Midwest compete for both private investment and federal funding.

California will replace a former statue on state capitol grounds honoring a Spanish missionary with one celebrating Sacramento-area Native American tribes.

Erected more than 50 years ago, the statue of Father Junipero Serra was forcefully toppled by racial justice protesters in July 2020 and has been in storage since.

The legislation, which officially removes the statue of Serra, was signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, at a virtual ceremony attended by Native American leaders from throughout the state.

Hours after the Supreme Court in 2012 narrowly upheld the Affordable Care Act but rejected making Medicaid expansion mandatory for states, Obama administration officials laughed when asked whether that would pose a problem.

In a White House briefing, top advisers to President Barack Obama told reporters states would be foolish to turn away billions in federal funding to help residents gain the security of health insurance.

Updated October 1, 2021 at 9:59 PM ET

After meeting with House Democrats at the Capitol on Friday, President Biden said it may take days or even weeks for Democrats to come to agreement on voting for a bipartisan infrastructure bill and for a separate package that covers most of his legislative agenda, including climate, childcare, education and other social spending.

"It doesn't matter whether it's in six minutes, six days or six weeks, we're going to get it done," the president said to reporters.

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