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Editor's note: The story contains some graphic descriptions of injuries that some readers may find disturbing.

On Oct. 23, 1983, Navy hospital corpsman James Edward Brown survived one of the deadliest terrorist attacks on Americans.

When a bomb detonated on the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut, Brown had been at his post in the sick hall on the Marine compound — about 200 yards away.

At the time, 1,800 Marines were stationed in the city during the Lebanese Civil War.

India's prime minister has been re-elected and his party is poised to secure more seats in parliament. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to American Enterprise Institute Scholar Sadanand Dhume about the win.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The Senate approved a $19.1 billion disaster aid package. A federal grand jury hit WikiLeaks' leader Julian Assange with new charges. And, India's prime minister has secured another five-year term.

NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Kevin Landy about the record number of migrants in detention. Landy was director of ICE's Office of Detention Policy and Planning during the Obama administration.

Members of Edward Gallagher's unit are scheduled to testify against him at the trial in San Diego. President Trump and others have criticized the military's decision to prosecute the case.

President Trump will be treated to a state visit in Japan this weekend. It will include meeting the new emperor and attending a sumo wrestling match. It's part of Japan's effort to woo Trump.

Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro has a plan to change immigration policy in the U.S. The former Housing and Urban Development secretary wants to address immigrant detention, family reunification and the immigration court system.

In stark contrast to current policy, he also wants to decriminalize crossing the border illegally, a plan he outlined in a Medium post in April.

Fourteen presidential candidates will converge on California next week for the Democratic Party's annual convention. It's the latest evidence of the state's new status as a key primary state.

Amy Poehler's newest film is based on an actual girls' trip with her friends to California wine country. Except her friends — both in the movie and in real life — are fellow Saturday Night Live alumni like Maya Rudolph, Ana Gasteyer, Tina Fey, Rachel Dratch, Paula Pell and Emily Spivey.

"I'm lucky to have some of the funniest people in the world be my actual friends," Poehler says in an interview. "And so I tried to quickly exploit that as fast as I could."

Updated at 5:49 a.m. ET

Theresa May will step down as prime minister of the U.K. on June 7, she said Friday at 10 Downing Street.

She came to the job in 2016 after U.K. voters backed plans to exit the European Union in a referendum. For the following three years, she attempted to navigate the difficult and complex process of making that happen.

"I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice, you have a duty to implement what they decide," she said. "I have done my best to do that."

Our shortlist of the best albums out this week includes a stirring call for social justice from soul and gospel legend Mavis Staples, rapper YG's powerful remembrance of Nipsey Hussle and the first new release in six years from lo-fi rock veterans Sebadoh. Host Robin Hilton is joined by NPR Music's Ann Powers, Sidney Madden and Stephen Thompson as they share their picks for the most essential albums dropping on May 24.

Featured Albums:

  1. Mavis Staples: We Get By
    Featured Song: "Sometime"

A 55-year-old Utah man who told his son that he was "so blessed" to achieve his lifelong dream of reaching the summit of Mount Everest, collapsed and died during his descent on Wednesday.

The family of Donald Lynn Cash, of Sandy, Utah, said the software sales executive and mountaineer apparently died of a heart attack. His body is not recoverable.

Facebook says it removed 3.39 billion fake accounts from October to March. That's twice the number of fraudulent accounts deleted in the previous six-month period.

Botswana's government is lifting a ban that protected its elephants from being hunted, part of a series of decisions that could have lasting impacts on the country's conservation efforts.

There was a bittersweet quality to ABC's triumphant two-hour live sitcom special on Wednesday night. At least, for me there was.

On the sweet side, watching talented stars like Jamie Foxx and Woody Harrelson re-create classic scripts from All in the Family and The Jeffersons was a shot of pure, uncut nostalgia. There are few spectacles as entertaining as these guys mugging their ways through impressions of classic characters like George Jefferson and Archie Bunker — in live performance.

British voters are expected to deliver a humiliating defeat to Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative Party in European Parliament elections on Thursday. Many who want Britain to pull out of the European Union are angry with May, who is under heavy pressure to resign, for failing to deliver on the Brexit referendum result nearly three years ago.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Prosecutors are bringing a slate of new charges against Julian Assange, including alleged violations of the Espionage Act, raising the stakes for his prospective extradition from the United Kingdom.

A growing number of states are passing laws banning abortion in the early stages of pregnancy. Anti-abortion-rights activists see this as an unprecedented opportunity to roll back Roe v. Wade.

Watch the video above to learn more.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Federal weather forecasters are predicting a "near normal" number of storms this hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through November 1.

Between nine and 15 named storms, including includes tropical storms, are predicted to form in the Atlantic this year, said Neil Jacobs, acting administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

In 1998, Ichard Oden committed a crime that got him sent away for two decades. He was 19.

He got out of prison in February. Today, he's a 40-year-old man with very little job experience.

As it turns out, Oden is coming back into society at a time when the economy is booming and attitudes toward people with criminal records are changing.

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Warning sirens went off in Jefferson City, Mo., late last night just before a violent tornado hit the city. Bacari Moody (ph) was in bed when his phone lit up with alerts.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo keeps getting worse. One of the main reasons - armed groups continue to attack Ebola responders. Today, the United Nations secretary-general created a new position, an emergency Ebola response coordinator, whose sole job is to keep health workers safe. It's a recognition that the only way to stop this outbreak is to stop violence against Ebola workers. NPR's Nurith Aizenman is here to talk about why. Nurith, we're 10 months into this outbreak. Where do things stand at this point?

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo keeps getting worse. One of the main reasons - armed groups continue to attack Ebola responders. Today, the United Nations secretary-general created a new position, an emergency Ebola response coordinator, whose sole job is to keep health workers safe. It's a recognition that the only way to stop this outbreak is to stop violence against Ebola workers. NPR's Nurith Aizenman is here to talk about why. Nurith, we're 10 months into this outbreak. Where do things stand at this point?

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo keeps getting worse. One of the main reasons - armed groups continue to attack Ebola responders. Today, the United Nations secretary-general created a new position, an emergency Ebola response coordinator, whose sole job is to keep health workers safe. It's a recognition that the only way to stop this outbreak is to stop violence against Ebola workers. NPR's Nurith Aizenman is here to talk about why. Nurith, we're 10 months into this outbreak. Where do things stand at this point?

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo keeps getting worse. One of the main reasons - armed groups continue to attack Ebola responders. Today, the United Nations secretary-general created a new position, an emergency Ebola response coordinator, whose sole job is to keep health workers safe. It's a recognition that the only way to stop this outbreak is to stop violence against Ebola workers. NPR's Nurith Aizenman is here to talk about why. Nurith, we're 10 months into this outbreak. Where do things stand at this point?

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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