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Last week, President Trump declared that he is "terminating" the decades-long U.S. relationship with the World Health Organization over the agency's relationship with China and withdrawing U.S. funding.

But it's unclear what will happen next — and what the short- and long-term implications will be.

Dallas police must intervene whenever a fellow officer is using excessive force, according to a new order from the city's police chief.

Chief Reneé Hall is implementing the "duty to intervene" policy for all of the city's sworn and non-sworn police officers, according to a statement released overnight Thursday.

After the Civil War, the federal government promised former slaves equality and citizenship. Historian Eric Foner says the failed promises reverberate today. Originally broadcast Jan. 9, 2006.

Copyright 2020 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

For more than a decade, Sampa Akter worked 12 hours a day at a garment factory in Bangladesh's capital, sewing denim jeans destined for shopping malls around the world. Earning $95 a month, she's been able to support her disabled brother, her sister and their parents.

That is, until late March — when her factory closed because of the coronavirus. Bangladesh has confirmed more than 57,000 cases and nearly 800 COVID-19 deaths in a population of 160 million.

As the country erupts in protests over police brutality and racism, two-thirds of Americans think President Trump has increased racial tensions in the U.S., according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

The poll offers a snapshot of a nation in upheaval after a video captured a Minneapolis police officer with his knee on the neck of a black man named George Floyd, who was pleading for his life before he died.

Navajo Nation Stymied By CARES Act Restrictions

1 hour ago

At the end of March, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, set aside $8 billion for tribes. But the money came with restrictions. It can only be used to cover expenses that are "incurred due to the public health emergency."

The mayor of Tacoma, Wash., is calling for four officers involved in the arrest of Manuel Ellis, a black man who was killed while in police custody, to be "fired and prosecuted to the full extent of the law."

Berlin has become the first German state to pass its own anti-discrimination law. The law bars public authorities — including police — from discriminating against anyone based on background, skin color, gender, religion, disabilities, worldview, age, class, education and sexual identity.

The legislation passed Thursday has been in the works for weeks, but it has taken on a new meaning in the wake of protests against systemic racism that have erupted in the U.S. and spread to cities around the world, including Berlin.

As America's meat producers confronted thousands of COVID-19 cases, Pacific Northwest seafood companies drafted rigorous plans to ward off similar spread of the disease in an industry where processors also work in close quarters.

But just a few weeks into the summer season, the industry has been shaken by its first major outbreak aboard a huge vessel with an onboard fish processing factory. This week, Seattle-based American Seafoods confirmed that 92 crew from its American Dynasty ship had tested positive for COVID-19, nearly three-fourths of the 126 people onboard.

As technology evolves, so does protest. Awareness of George Floyd's killing at the hands of Minneapolis police officers could only inspire an international grassroots movement because a teenager, Darnella Frazier, decided to record his arrest using her phone and post it to social media. Activists are organizing marches and rallies on Twitter and Instagram, even as they warn participants to be careful of surveillance on those platforms.

Clint Smith Reflects On This Moment

4 hours ago

About The Episode

The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.

About Clint Smith

Clint Smith is a writer, poet, teacher, and Emerson Fellow at New America.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Tens of thousands of people were planning to gather across Australia this weekend to protest the treatment of Indigenous people in police custody and to show solidarity with U.S. demonstrations calling for racial justice.

Chanting "black lives matter," hundreds of protesters filled Garema Place, in the capital, Canberra, Friday morning. But much larger protests were being planned for Saturday in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Candelas Guitars, a neighborhood fixture in East Los Angeles, has been hit hard by the coronavirus shutdown.

The shop has been serving customers since 1947, and Tomás Delgado says his family has been making guitars in Los Angeles for three generations. But the business, named after Delgado's great-uncle Candelario, dates back even further, when his family lived in Mexico.

This episode of StoryCorps originally aired in 2015.

At StoryCorps, Aiden Sykes, then 9, asked his father, Albert, some of the heavy questions on his mind, including why they attend civil rights demonstrations together. Albert said he worries about bringing up his black son in a society where the odds are stacked against him simply because of his race.

"My dream is for you to live out your dreams," Albert said.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The district attorney in Ohama had ruled the fatal shooting of James Scurlock, 22, by a white bar owner during a weekend scuffle, was done in self defense. The DA now wants a broader investigation.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Editor's note: NPR will be continuing this conversation about Being Black in America online and on air.

As protests continue around the country against systemic racism and police brutality, black Americans describe fear, anger and a weariness about tragic killings that are becoming all too familiar.

Updated at 10:59 a.m. ET

The U.S economy rebounded with surprising strength last month as businesses began to reopen from the coronavirus lockdown. U.S. employers added 2.5 million jobs in May, and the unemployment rate fell to 13.3%.

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A month ago, America's pork farmers were in crisis. About 40 percent of the country's pork plants were shut down because they had become hot spots of coronavirus infection.

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