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Becky Sullivan

Becky Sullivan has reported and produced for NPR since 2011 with a focus on hard news and breaking stories. She has been on the ground to cover natural disasters, disease outbreaks, elections and protests, delivering stories to both broadcast and digital platforms.

In January 2020, she traveled to Tehran to help cover the assassination and funeral of Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani, work that made NPR a Pulitzer finalist that year. Her work covering the death of Breonna Taylor won an Edward R. Murrow Award for Hard News.

Sullivan has spoken to armed service members in Afghanistan on the anniversary of Sept. 11, reported from a military parade in Pyongyang for coverage of the regime of Kim Jong-Un, visited hospitals and pregnancy clinics in Colombia to cover the outbreak of Zika and traveled Haiti to report on the aftermath of natural disasters. She's also reported from around the U.S., including Hurricane Michael in Florida and the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

She previously worked as a producer for All Things Considered, where she regularly led the broadcast and produced high-profile newsmaker interviews. Sullivan led NPR's special coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, multiple State of the Union addresses and other special and breaking news coverage.

Originally a Kansas Citian, Sullivan also regularly brings coverage of the Midwest and Great Plains region to NPR.

Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., a lifelong, unrepentant white supremacist who shot and killed three people outside a Jewish community center and retirement home in suburban Kansas City in 2014, has died in prison.

Miller, also known as Frazier Glenn Cross, dedicated his life to white supremacy. He spent decades writing and spreading racist and antisemitic messages and threatening and inflicting violence against liberals, Blacks and Jews.

Before she ran for governor of Georgia, before she registered 800,000 new voters with her organization Fair Fight, before she became a Democratic power broker with her name perennially in the mix for high-level political positions, Stacey Abrams wrote romance novels.

Now, her first three books, originally printed about 20 years ago under the nom de plume Selena Montgomery, will be reissued in 2022 by the publisher Berkley, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

Updated May 3, 2021 at 12:35 PM ET

Family, friends and national civil rights advocates gathered Monday for the funeral of Andrew Brown Jr. in Elizabeth City, N.C., as the circumstances of his shooting death last month by sheriff's deputies remained unclear.

Good news: Prancer has been adopted.

The 2-year-old, 13-pound Chihuahua mutt not so charitably described as "a chucky doll in a dog's body" was listed for adoption this month in an unusually honest ad that charmed hundreds of thousands of people on social media.

One week ago, people celebrated in the streets of Minneapolis as a judge read the guilty verdicts in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, convicted of murdering George Floyd.

The United States will release 60 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine from drugmaker AstraZeneca to other countries over the next several months, the White House announced Monday.

The vaccine, which has not been authorized for use in the U.S., will be released once it clears safety reviews by the Food and Drug Administration. That could happen in the "coming weeks," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at a press briefing.

Leaders of nine Southeast Asian countries on Saturday called for an immediate end to the violence in Myanmar, where the military government has cracked down violently on the enormous protests over its February coup.

At an emergency summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations held in Jakarta, Indonesia's president called the situation in Myanmar "unacceptable."

"The violence must be stopped and democracy, stability and peace in Myanmar must be restored," President Joko Widodo said.

In the days since a jury in Minneapolis convicted former police officer Derek Chauvin on two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, many police officers and law enforcement organizations around the U.S. have expressed relief at the trial's outcome.

After the video of Floyd's death went viral last May, many sought to distance themselves from Chauvin, characterizing him as one of the so-called "bad apples" that spoil the reputation of officers who try to do things the right way.

Updated April 22, 2021 at 2:59 PM ET

Mourners gathered Thursday in Minneapolis for the funeral of Daunte Wright, just two days after a jury there convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin of the murder of George Floyd.

The panel of 12 jurors weighing the case against the fired Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd has resumed deliberations.

The jury, who are sequestered in a nearby hotel under the supervision of Hennepin County Sheriff's deputies, are considering three charges against former officer Derek Chauvin: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A strange, tense springtime has come to the Twin Cities as residents and law enforcement alike brace for a verdict in the intensely watched trial of fired police officer Derek Chauvin over the death of George Floyd.

The Hennepin County courthouse in downtown Minneapolis, where the trial is taking place, has become a fortress, surrounded by tall fences topped with barbed wire.

Never has so much attention focused on these quiet, leafy eight square miles along the Mississippi River.

Brooklyn Center, Minn., a small inner-ring suburb of modest postwar houses and apartment buildings, is the latest community to feel the heat of the national spotlight in the days since the death of Daunte Wright, the 20-year-old Black man shot during a traffic stop by a Brooklyn Center police officer who officials say mistook her handgun for her Taser.

All federal prison inmates will have the opportunity to receive a vaccine by mid-May, according to the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Michael Carvajal.

Vaccines have already been made available to all federal prison staff, he said, speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee in a hearing Thursday.

More than 40,000 people incarcerated in federal prisons have received both doses of the vaccine, the bureau says, which is about a third of the people in BOP custody. Nearly 18,000 federal prison staff have been fully vaccinated.

The former Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer charged in the killing of Daunte Wright made her first appearance in court Thursday as members of the Wright family continued their call for consequences.

Police officials have said Kim Potter, a 48-year-old white woman, mistook her handgun for her Taser when she fatally shot Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, on Sunday. In body camera footage, Potter can be heard yelling "Taser!" just before shooting him.

Updated April 14, 2021 at 7:33 PM ET

Kim Potter, the former Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer who shot Daunte Wright, has been charged with second-degree manslaughter, according to Minnesota authorities.

The Washington County Attorney's Office announced the charges Wednesday.

In their first public press conference, family members of Daunte Wright, the 20-year-old Black man shot and killed by police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., expressed grief and anger, called for accountability and questioned why police felt the need to use any force on their son.

Updated April 13, 2021 at 2:57 PM ET

Kim Potter, the Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer who shot and killed Daunte Wright, has resigned. Potter had served 26 years on the force before the fatal encounter Sunday where officials said she mistakenly fired her handgun instead of her Taser.

Police Chief Tim Gannon, who on Monday released the body camera footage and characterized the shooting as an "accidental discharge," has also stepped down.

Protests spread across the country Monday night after police officials in Brooklyn Center, Minn., said they believed that the officer who shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright had intended to use her Taser but accidentally fired her handgun instead.

Even as a cold drizzle fell in Minnesota, hundreds turned out for a memorial protest at the police department in Brooklyn Center, a few miles from the scene of Wright's death, despite a 7 p.m. curfew that had been called across much of the Twin Cities area.

Updated April 12, 2021 at 10:44 PM ET

The police officer said to have fatally shot Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man killed in what started as a traffic stop, has been identified as Kim Potter.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Updated April 1, 2021 at 6:30 PM ET

Dozens of states are considering Republican-led bills that advocates say are harmful to transgender people. The recent spate of bills are "really challenging to see," says Dr. Rachel Levine, the nation's newly confirmed assistant secretary for health.

From Sacramento to Salt Lake City to Philadelphia, thousands gathered this weekend at vigils across the country with signs, candles, portraits and flowers grieving the eight victims of Tuesday's shootings in Atlanta and crying out against anti-Asian racism.

Calling it an "exceptional discovery," researchers at Pompeii have announced the uncovering of an intact ceremonial chariot from a villa near the famous Italian archaeological site.

The announcement Saturday called the chariot "an extraordinary find" that "has no parallel in Italy thus far."

The day after Myanmar's ambassador to the United Nations made a remarkable speech before the United Nations General Assembly denouncing the country's recent military coup, state television in Myanmar is reporting that he has been removed from his post.

The speech and subsequent firing come as protesters face another weekend of crackdowns and violence in their demonstrations against the armed takeover.

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