KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Courtney Dorning

Courtney Dorning has been a Senior Editor for NPR's All Things Considered since November 2018. In that role, she's the lead editor for the daily show. Dorning is responsible for newsmaker interviews, lead news segments and the small, quirky features that are a hallmark of the network's flagship afternoon magazine program.

Dorning has been the editor on interviews ranging from former First Lady Michelle Obama, actress and activist Jane Fonda and Speaker of the House. She contributes heavily to All Things Considered's political coverage and has played a key role in the show's coverage of the #MeToo movement. Previously, Dorning was an editor at Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, she spent nearly ten years at ABC News as a researcher and producer. Dorning helped produce town meetings from Israel in 2000 and 2002, and was a key part of Nightline's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11 and the Iraq war.

Dorning lives just outside Washington, D.C., with her husband, three children and a black lab. Having a singleton and twins in 18 months has sharpened the multi-tasking skills and nerves of steel that are essential for editing two hours of daily live programming.

Dorning is a graduate of Saint Mary's College and has a master's degree from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

For renters facing eviction in the U.S., things have looked bleak for the last few months.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Remember that phone call? July 25, 2019, the president of Ukraine speaking with the then-president of the United States.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

DONALD TRUMP: It was beautiful. It was just a perfect conversation.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Government officials have begged, pleaded and even bribed Americans to get the coronavirus vaccine.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

On April 30 of last year, armed militiamen entered the Michigan State Capitol Building looking for Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTER: (Yelling) Open the door.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

A lot of us made it through the worst of COVID isolation by spending time with a guy named Ted Lasso.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TED LASSO")

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Updated June 9, 2021 at 11:31 AM ET

From the pandemic to racial justice protests, a contested election and a second presidential impeachment: The events of the past year divided the nation, but they also challenged conventional notions held in newsrooms about objectivity and fairly representing diverse points of view.

After their two-hour CBS interview in March, Oprah Winfrey and Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, have a new documentary series together on Apple TV+. It's called The Me You Can't See.

The series focuses on the importance of mental health and on what it's like to struggle with it. The Me You Can't See tells the stories of both regular people and famous people, including Lady Gaga, Glenn Close and Prince Harry himself.

After a long, dark year, social muscles have atrophied. In-person gatherings now call for weighty questions about COVID-19 safety. And many people, who during the pandemic found relief in empty calendars, don't want to go back to the world as they knew it.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Liz Cheney would not let it go.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pages