KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Rachel Martin

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Early in his presidency, Joe Biden signed an executive order that aimed to reunite kids who'd been separated from their parents at the border.

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In an aside during his speech to Congress last night, President Biden at one point told lawmakers, you all know this, but the American people, I want to make sure they understand.

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President Biden has been in office for 100 days, and in his first speech to Congress last night, he gave lawmakers a challenge.

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Mark Ramos Nishita, better known as Money Mark, is 61 and lives in LA surrounded by his massive collection of instruments – guitars and recording gear including more than 70 Casio keyboards. Nishita is sometimes called the "fourth Beastie Boy" for his songwriting and touring work with the group, including keyboard contributions you may recognize from Check Your Head and Ill Communication.

Renee Ekwoge can't remember the last conversation she had with her father. They stopped talking regularly months ago, after she moved nearly 1,000 miles away for a new job last summer.

"The last time I saw my dad, he was painting my house," Ekwoge says. "He came and helped paint all weekend. It was nice when we lived closer and had ways to hang out that didn't include nonsense videos."

Those "nonsense videos" are about conspiracy theories. They've become a major focus for her father — on topics like COVID-19 and Sept. 11, 2001. He watches them on YouTube.

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The coronavirus is an equal opportunity hazard. Anybody can get it. Right? But even at this late stage of the pandemic, it's revealing a less-than-equal-opportunity world.

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Today, President Biden sets a climate goal that he wants to achieve in less than a decade.

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The murder conviction of Derek Chauvin could represent "a huge paradigm shift," if three other Minneapolis officers charged in George Floyd's death are also convicted, says Nekima Levy Armstrong, a civil rights attorney and activist in Minneapolis.

Former presidents typically try not to wade into politics — and former President George W. Bush has made a point of sticking to that unspoken rule.

In office, he pushed for immigration reform. But he hasn't discussed the matter in a significant way since he left office — until now.

He's doing it in a new book of portraits called Out of Many, One. It features the stories of 43 immigrants — athletes and public servants, business leaders, educators.

In a conversation with NPR, former President Bush talks about his art and immigration.

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Derek Chauvin is in a jail cell this morning after a jury found him guilty of murder and manslaughter.

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Across Minneapolis, the reaction has sounded like this.

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White evangelical women are often taught that their calling is to be passive in the church, to be submissive to their husbands and to stay out of the pulpit.

History, though, says otherwise.

In her new book, The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women Became Gospel Truth, historian Beth Allison Barr traces cultural sources of patriarchy that have all but erased women's historical importance as leaders of the faith.

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April is National Poetry Month, a celebration of poets and poetry that's been in place for 25 years.

Last month, as the U.S. grieved over attacks against Asian Americans, NPR's Morning Edition collected poems on how people grapple with the increased violence and discrimination.

Youn Yuh-jung is an institution in Korean cinema. Her career spans five decades and includes starring roles in classic Korean films and famous TV dramas. Now, at 73, she has newfound fame in the U.S. for her role in the Oscar-nominated film Minari.

Youn is nominated for Best Supporting Actress, making her the first South Korean woman ever to be nominated for an Academy Award in an acting category.

When the Rolling Stones released "Gimme Shelter" in 1969, everyone recognized Mick Jagger. But at the time, no one knew who that voice – you know the one – belonged to.

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After mass shootings last month, President Biden upset some advocates of gun regulation. He suggested it was not the time for him to propose gun laws that Congress might block anyway.

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The White House is taking President Biden's infrastructure bill on the road.

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When Sonora Jha gave birth to her son, she was certain of one thing: She wanted to raise him as a feminist.

The number of migrants crossing into the United States in March was higher than in any other month in at least 15 years.

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President Biden's plan to revamp the nation's aging infrastructure is ambitious.

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Later today, President Biden will unveil his ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan.

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Eight minutes and 46 seconds. That's the amount of time that former police officer Derek Chauvin was believed to have held his knee on George Floyd's neck.

In the aftermath of Floyd's death, 8:46 became part of the rallying cry in protests around the world. It appeared on signs. People chanted it. They held vigils and stayed quiet for 8 minutes and 46 seconds to mark Floyd's death.

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Where did COVID-19 come from? That's been the question behind plenty of conspiracy theories and a whole lot of study by scientists trying to figure out the truth.

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