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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

India's megacity of Mumbai is in the crosshairs of a tropical cyclone for the first time in well over a century, as a storm called Nisarga came ashore Wednesday in an area of the country already hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Severe Cyclonic Storm Nisarga was spinning wind gusts up to 75 mph as it made landfall south of Mumbai, which was experiencing heavy rainfall, according to the India Meteorological Department.

It's not often that Justin Trudeau is caught speechless.

But when the Canadian prime minister was asked what he thought of President Trump's actions to quash a wave of protests across the U.S., Trudeau paused before responding – for 21 seconds as the cameras recorded his awkward silence.

During a Tuesday news conference in front of his Ottawa residence, the prime minister fielded this question from a reporter:

Updated at 11:44 a.m. ET

One week after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis Police custody, demonstrations against police brutality and systemic racism continued across the United States. Many cities imposed curfews, and President Trump again warned he would order active duty military forces to restore order if state and local governments, in his judgement, failed to do so.

Here are details of some protests around the country.

St. Louis

Updated at 10:33 a.m. ET

President Trump, in a conference call Monday with the nation's governors, threatened to deploy the U.S. military to restore order unless states hit by days of unrest "put down" violent demonstrations, urging leaders to "dominate" lawbreakers or risk looking like "a bunch of jerks."

A slickly produced 26-minute video called Plandemic has exploded on social media in recent days, claiming to present a view of COVID-19 that differs from the "official" narrative.

The video has been viewed millions of times on YouTube via links that are replaced as quickly as the video-sharing service can remove them for violating its policy against "COVID-19 misinformation."

NASA has selected three companies to develop the first vehicle in more than 50 years to put humans on the moon, with space firms run by billionaires Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos among the competitors.

Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin says he's infected with the coronavirus, joining nearly 106,500 others in the country who have been similarly diagnosed.

Speaking during a videoconference with President Vladimir Putin that was broadcast Thursday on state-run Rossiya 24 television, Mishustin — who took over as prime minister from Dmitry Medvedev in January — told Putin that he had tested positive for the virus.

South Korea, which waged an early battle against COVID-19 after the disease emerged from China, said on Thursday that it had no new domestic cases for the first time since a surge nearly 10 weeks ago.

The country experienced its first case on Jan. 20, but didn't see infections ramp up until mid-February. They peaked on Feb. 29 with 909 daily cases and have been trending down ever since.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Wednesday that all city and county residents who want a coronavirus test can now get one for the first time since COVID-19 cases began appearing there in January.

The announcement, which makes Los Angeles one of the first major cities in the nation to offer free testing to all its residents, came on the same day that county health officials reported a surge in the number of new COVID-19 cases, which they attributed in part to more widespread testing.

The Tokyo Olympics, already delayed by a year because of the coronavirus pandemic, might not be held at all unless COVID-19 can be contained, Japan's prime minister said Wednesday.

Shinzo Abe's remarks came as the country's prefectural governors urged him to extend a nationwide state of emergency aimed at combating the disease, which has infected more than 13,700 people in Japan and killed nearly 400, according to official statistics.

The 2018 sinking of a duck boat on Missouri's Table Rock Lake that killed 17 people would likely not have occurred if the U.S. Coast Guard had acted on recommendations made after a similar tragedy more than two decades ago, NTSB investigators said Tuesday.

Nigeria's president has announced the country will begin easing a more than month-long coronavirus lockdown in the capital Abuja, and its largest city, Lagos, even as he imposed restrictions on another city where COVID-19 has surged.

President Muhammadu Buhari said the stay-at-home orders imposed on March 30 have come at a "very heavy economic cost," as ordinary Nigerians, many of whom rely on daily wages to survive, have been left without enough money to eat. Instead, Buhari said, there would be a "phased and gradual" lifting of the lockdown beginning on May 4.

An effort by China to express solidarity with an Asian neighbor that is also battling the deadly coronavirus pandemic has not gone exactly to plan.

Last week, the Chinese Embassy in Manila posted a music video titled Iisang Dagat, or "One Sea" in Tagalog, the language commonly spoken in the Philippines. The reference is to the South China Sea, which lies between China and the Philippine archipelago.

Japan will begin allowing dentists to take nose and throat swab samples to test patients for the novel coronavirus, according to The Japan Times.

Japan currently conducts about 9,000 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for the virus daily, and the move for dentists with special training to administer the tests is aimed at relieving the burden on doctors and boosting capacity in hopes of reaching Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's goal of 20,000 per day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added several new symptoms to its existing list of symptoms for COVID-19.

The CDC has long said that fever, cough and shortness of breath are indications that someone might have the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. It has now added six more conditions that may come with the disease: chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell.

After spending weeks recovering from COVID-19, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was back on the job Monday, praising his country for its "grit and guts" in the face of the pandemic, but warning that any letup in efforts to halt the spread of the novel coronavirus risked "a new wave of death and disease."

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says that the island nation has defeated — for the present — the coronavirus as her government announced the lifting of some restrictions imposed to halt the spread of COVID-19.

"There is no widespread undetected community transmission in New Zealand. We have won that battle," Ardern said Monday. "But we must remain vigilant if we are to keep it that way."

Asked whether New Zealand had eliminated COVID-19, Ardern replied: "currently."

Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced Sunday that his country will soon begin the process of reopening its economy after undergoing the longest novel coronavirus lockdown anywhere to date.

In a nationwide television address, Conte said that beginning May 4, Italians would be allowed to use parks, visit relatives and attend funerals as part of a phased plan for lifting restrictions as the daily number of new COVID-19 cases trends downward from a peak of 6,557 on March 21.

As the world's 1.8 billion Muslims begin observing the holy month of Ramadan, traditionally a time of dawn-to-dusk fasting, festivities and communal prayer, an unprecedented global pandemic is changing the celebration this year in equally unprecedented ways.

The U.S. is calling on China to permanently shut down the country's wet markets, where the deadly coronavirus is thought to have first emerged late last year, as Australia urged an international scientific investigation of the health risks associated with them.

Updated at 10:46 a.m. ET

Tornadoes swept through parts of Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana early Wednesday evening, leaving at least six people dead and injuring more than two dozen others in their paths of destruction. The tornadoes were among a series of severe storms that bulldozed a route west to east across the South on Wednesday.

China, in a further bid to keep a backwash of coronavirus infections from its borders, will ban all nonresidents and outside vehicles from residential areas of the city of Harbin, a major industrial entrepôt located near the country's northeast border with Russia.

Police in Canada now believe at least 22 people were killed during what is thought to be the country's worst-ever mass shooting — a methodical rampage over the weekend in Nova Scotia province that spanned 16 separate crime scenes in five communities.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police originally reported at least 16 dead after Saturday's attacks, in which the assailant appeared to have shot many victims and then set fire to the crime scenes. On Tuesday, the RCMP said it had recovered additional remains of victims at various locations in the Maritime province.

Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific Airways will lay off dozens of U.S. cabin crew and other staff members in a cost-saving move aimed at shoring up its bottom line as its planes sit idle amid a sharp decrease in demand caused by the coronavirus.

The airline said Friday that it would cut 286 staff jobs located in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

"As a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which has virtually halted global travel, Cathay Pacific has made the difficult decision to close its US cabin crew bases," an airline spokeswoman said.

China has made a huge upward adjustment to its official count of COVID-19 victims in Wuhan — the city where the novel coronavirus was first identified in December — adding nearly 1,300 deaths.

The change comes on the same day that the worldwide number of confirmed infections topped 2 million for the first time since the start of the pandemic, with well over a quarter of those in the U.S. Some 145,000 have died across the globe, with more than 33,000 of the deaths in the U.S.

China's economy contracted by 6.8% in the first three months of 2020 from the same period a year ago — its biggest drop in nearly three decades, as the country's factory output and domestic spending ground to a halt amid the unprecedented shock of the coronavirus pandemic.

Data from the National Bureau of Statistics of China on Friday showed that industrial output was down 8.4% from the year before and retail sales fell by a whopping 19% as the country has been on lockdown for weeks in an effort to contain the spread of the virus.

Bangladesh's coast guard said Thursday that it rescued hundreds of starving Rohingya refugees from a fishing trawler that had been drifting at sea. A survivor said at least 28 others died during a failed, two-month effort to reach Malaysia.

The refugees, mostly women and children, were intercepted late Wednesday after the boat attempted to make landfall on Bangladesh's southeast coast near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh coast guard Lt. Cmdr. Sohel Rana said.

Nearly a dozen small craft operated by the naval wing of Iran's Revolutionary Guard carried out harassing maneuvers dangerously close to U.S. warships conducting exercises in the Persian Gulf, Navy officials said Wednesday.

The Dominican Republic, which had been set to go to the polls in a first round of presidential elections in May, will postpone the vote until July due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the country's election commission announced.

After insisting less than a month ago that COVID-19 in Russia was "under control," President Vladimir Putin on Monday squarely acknowledged the opposite, with the largest day-to-day increase in cases to date and the head of the coronavirus task force warning that the country is "nowhere near" peak infections.

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