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Tim Mak

Sen. Richard Burr's sale of up to $1.7 million in stocks shortly before the recent market crash was one of the lawmaker's only market-beating trades since record keeping began eight years ago, according to a new study.

The new analysis, presented by researchers at Dartmouth College, shows just how unusual the North Carolina senator's transactions were. On a single day, Feb. 13 of this year, Burr unloaded a significant portion of his net worth — a departure from his typically low-volume trading history.

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President Trump declared a state of national emergency one month ago in the Rose Garden.

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Updated at 10:10 p.m. ET

One month ago today, President Trump declared a national emergency.

In a Rose Garden address, flanked by leaders from giant retailers and medical testing companies, he promised a mobilization of public and private resources to attack the coronavirus.

"We've been working very hard on this. We've made tremendous progress," Trump said. "When you compare what we've done to other areas of the world, it's pretty incredible."

But few of the promises made that day have come to pass.

President Trump has removed the head of a group charged with overseeing the $2 trillion coronavirus package passed by Congress last month.

The coronavirus recovery law requires that an existing inspector general be selected by a council of inspectors general to oversee the response to the pandemic. That council picked Glenn Fine, the acting inspector general at the Department of Defense, to lead the newly formed Pandemic Response Accountability Committee.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr sold off a large amount of stocks before the coronavirus market crash, and now the Justice Department is looking into his statements around this time period, NPR can report.

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Updated at 11:28 p.m. ET

The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee warned a small group of well-connected constituents three weeks ago to prepare for dire economic and societal effects of the coronavirus, according to a secret recording obtained by NPR.

The remarks from U.S. Sen. Richard Burr were more stark than any he had delivered in more public forums.

On Feb. 27, when the United States had 15 confirmed cases of COVID-19, President Trump was tamping down fears and suggesting that the virus could be seasonal.

It's 2016 all over again — at least from Russia's perspective.

Russia's state-sponsored messaging about Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign was more neutral in the fall.

But over the past six weeks, this coverage has shifted to mirror pro-Sanders talking points first used in the last presidential campaign, said Clint Watts of the Foreign Policy Research Institute, who has been monitoring Russian interference continuously.

"What's really come on strong just in the last 30 to 45 days are very similar narratives that we saw in 2016 about Sanders," Watts told NPR.

American Alan Gross, a prisoner in Cuba for five years during the Obama administration, is accusing Bernie Sanders of commending the communist country when the senator came to visit him behind bars.

Sanders visited Cuba as part of a congressional delegation in 2014, along with Sens. Heidi Heitkamp and Jon Tester.

During the one-hour meeting, Sanders told the prisoner that he didn't understand why others criticized Cuba, Gross said in an interview with NPR.

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Rachel and I are in Des Moines covering tonight's caucuses in Iowa. The presidential campaign season is officially beginning here. Democrats are determined to defeat President Trump, who is likely to be celebrating a major victory.

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Hundred-and-nineteen days after Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry into President Trump and 34 days after the House voted to impeach him, the Senate trial has begun in earnest.

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UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: The House has passed H. Res. 798 (ph), a resolution appointing and authorizing managers for the impeachment trial of Donald John Trump, president of the United States.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: The message will be received.

Trump Impeached

Dec 19, 2019

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The months-long march towards impeachment in the U.S. House ended last night. Donald Trump is now the third U.S. president in history to be impeached.

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NANCY PELOSI: Those in favor, say aye.

AYE VOTERS: Aye.

PELOSI: Those opposed, nay.

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When the House began voting on articles of impeachment last night, President Trump was in Michigan.

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NPR's congressional reporter Tim Mak and national political correspondent Mara Liasson have been following this debate all day and into the night. And they are both with me now.

Hello.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

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