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A diver looking for interesting undersea video footage recently got more than she bargained for off the coast of Cornwall, England, when she happened upon a giant barrel jellyfish that was bigger than she is.

The fake license plates, forged passports and concealed surveillance camera were locked away in the musty archives of Israel's Mossad intelligence agency for 50 years. Now they are touring the U.S. in a traveling exhibition about the Mossad's legendary capture of Nazi officer Adolf Eichmann.

But one object crucial to the mission's success is not on display: the needle used to inject a sedative into Eichmann's arm before he was smuggled onto a plane back to Israel to stand trial.

North Korea warned Tuesday that negotiations with the United States could falter and that its nuclear and missile tests might resume if the U.S. and South Korea move forward with planned military exercises.

There's a new king of the hill.

The small town of Harlech in Wales has ousted Dunedin, New Zealand, for bragging rights to the world's steepest street. Guinness World Records announced the new title in a news release on Tuesday.

Ffordd Pen Llech, the name of the Wales street, winds up at a slope of 37.45 % stretch over fall, Guinness World Records said. That's in comparison to a slope of 34.97% at Dunedin's Baldwin Street.

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How do four Americans respond to the president suggesting they leave?

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A moment that foreign policy watchers had been waiting for happened on Friday.

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Today the state of Oklahoma laid out its closing argument for holding a pharmaceutical company responsible for the national opioid epidemic.

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BRAD BECKWORTH: Because the facts in this case showed the causation is causation. When you oversupply, people die.

SHAPIRO: That's Brad Beckworth, lawyer with the Oklahoma Attorney General's Office. On the other side, Johnson & Johnson attorney Larry Ottaway said opioids are already subject to a litany of rules.

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As we just heard, the Trump administration has been leaning on Mexico and Guatemala to become safe third countries, and we're going to hear from one of those countries now. NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Guatemala City. Hi there.

The Bank of England's new 50-pound note will feature mathematician Alan Turing, honoring the code-breaker who helped lay the foundation for computer science.

Maersk — the world's largest container shipping company — has an astonishing goal. By 2050, the company vows to send goods — everything from electronics to soybeans to sneakers — around the world with zero carbon emissions.

The environmental logic behind such a promise is straightforward: Shipping contributes substantially to global climate change.

But the business case is not as obvious.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

China's economy grew at the slowest pace in 27 years, as the trade war with the United States takes a toll.

The second-largest economy in the world grew 6.2% in the second quarter of 2019, a drop from 6.4% in the first quarter, according to data released by the Chinese government.

The pace of growth in the second quarter was at its slowest since 1992.

Ghost Fleet is a gripping new documentary about modern-day slaves in the Thai fishing industry. The film delves into the sordid labor practices of an industry that supplies the United States, Europe and Asia with seafood, but it does so by focusing on the compelling work of Bangkok-based Patima Tungpuchayakul, an abolitionist who has devoted her life to helping "lost" men return home.

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At a Border Patrol holding facility in El Paso, Texas, an agent told a Honduran family that one parent would be sent to Mexico while the other parent and their three children could stay in the United States, according to the family. The agent turned to the couple's youngest daughter — 3-year-old Sofia, whom they call Sofi — and asked her to make a choice.

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Syria Update

Jul 14, 2019

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New Zealand's first gun buyback in the wake of the Christchurch shooting attracted more than 150 gun owners on Saturday, according to law enforcement officials.

The buyback, which took place in Christchurch, is the first of more than 250 planned nationwide this year.

A Look At Mexico's New National Guard

Jul 13, 2019

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Under pressure from President Trump's tariffs threat, Mexico reached a deal with the United States on June 7 to step up immigration enforcement and to take in more migrants waiting for their U.S. asylum hearings.

The agreement reads: "Given the dramatic increase in migrants moving from Central America through Mexico to the United States, both countries recognize the vital importance of rapidly resolving the humanitarian emergency and security situation. The Governments of the United States and Mexico will work together to immediately implement a durable solution."

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A high-speed chase involving a suspected narco-submarine out in the eastern Pacific Ocean offers a look into just how dangerous the U.S. Coast Guard's operations to combat drug smuggling can be.

The dramatic, one-minute video was recorded by a member of the Coast Guard wearing a helmet camera on June 18. It was released on Thursday.

"Stop your boat!" a Coast Guard member's voice can be heard repeatedly shouting in Spanish.

The first pieces of the S-400 missile defense system Turkey bought from Russia — against the wishes of the U.S. and NATO — began arriving Friday, according to Turkey's National Defense Ministry. In response, the Pentagon is expected to announce that Turkey will be barred from receiving the new F-35 fighter.

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Now the story of a family reunited. They're originally from Yemen, and the Trump administration's travel ban had separated the parents from the children. The mother and father were back in Djibouti while their children were here in the U.S. NPR's Leila Fadel saw them brought back together this week.

LEILA FADEL, BYLINE: Ahlam Alsoufi drops to her knees in tears in baggage claim at the Detroit Metro Airport. She opened her arms, and her 3-year-old son, Muslim, rushes into them and hugs tight.

MUSLIM: (Speaking Arabic).

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