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Scenes of violence in Afghanistan triggered painful memories for Hossein Mahrammi and his wife, Razia Mahrami, refugees living in the U.S. He sees the hope of a democratic, peaceful Afghanistan vanishing as the Taliban take over the country and the future of family and friends there uncertain. The couple know all too well the hardships that await the thousands of refugees fleeing.

"What we are watching in the news is real to us," Mahrammi says referring to the gruesome scenes of people desperately trying to leave his home country and the massive attack at the Kabul Airport.

MARCELINE, Haiti – Authorities in Haiti have postponed the start of school across the country after last month's 7.2 magnitude earthquake destroyed schools and homes across Haiti's southern peninsula.

It is the latest unwanted disruption to education in Haiti, where instruction has been interrupted repeatedly over the last two years due both to COVID-19 and the gang violence and kidnappings that have terrorized much of the country.

Scaly and with forked tongues, Komodo dragons are the largest lizards to still walk the Earth.

But their days here may be numbered.

A new report from an international biodiversity conservation organization says the fearsome reptiles are edging closer to global extinction.

Park Seo-joon will appear in an upcoming Marvel Studios movie and left South Korea on Friday to begin filming, the actor's agency said.

News of Park's foray into the Marvel Cinematic Universe comes shortly after the release of Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings, starring Simu Liu, Marvel's first movie with an Asian superhero.

Two hours before the final of the men's 100-meter T51 race in this summer's Paralympic games, Peter Genyn arrived at the venue to find his wheelchair badly damaged.

"We had just arrived 45 minutes before the warmup, and we had three flat tires and a broken compensator. Everybody did everything they could to help, including the Dutch team," the Belgian athlete told the Olympic Information Services after the race Friday.

MEXICO CITY — When Gildo Garza finally fled his home state of Tamaulipas in 2017 and arrived in Mexico City, he knew where to go first: the federal attorney general's office. Even if the chances were slim, he had a sliver of hope investigators would find and prosecute the narcos and corrupt politicians who wanted him dead for his reporting.

On Aug. 14, a restaurant owner inside the Kabul airport terminal suddenly sold out his entire stock of food, as passengers flocked to the airport. Then he noticed the Afghan customs officers, airport police and other officials changing out of their uniforms and into civilian clothes. Some were looking frantically for seats on the last flights out.

Sometimes when Shugri Said Salh is running errands in Sonoma, Calif., where she currently lives, she says she has "visions" of her former life as a young nomad in Somalia. For example, one day, while eating sushi in front of Whole Foods, she spotted a customer carrying an African-style basket and a water jug — and suddenly she was transported.

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While the U.S. air lift out of Kabul has ended efforts to resettle tens of thousands of Afghans in the U.S., well, that's only just begun. And already they're facing some very big obstacles. NPR's Joel Rose reports.

EPERNAY, France - In a chilly windowless basement in this provincial French city, workers stack bottles of bubbly. Not just any bubbly, but le vrai champagne, which thanks to a special protected status can only be made in the Champagne region of eastern France.

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A band of Afghan resistance fighters holed up in Afghanistan's rugged Panjshir province northeast of Kabul has repelled repeated attacks by Taliban fighters in recent days, a representative for the group tells NPR.

When the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, a former Afghan army colonel named Mohammed became part of the massive crush of people trying to flee at the Kabul airport last week.

Mohammed and his family — a wife and five children — waited for hours to reach a Taliban checkpoint outside the airport. He presented identification documents that included his U.S. Social Security card and a Texas driver's license, both acquired during two training stints at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, more than a decade ago.

He hit a wall of hostility.

Each week, we answer frequently asked questions about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions." See an archive of our FAQs here.

Sprawling fields of rocks about the size of your fist coat the Pacific seabed. Below miles of ocean, these nodules burst with copper, nickel, manganese and cobalt, all key to building batteries for electric vehicles.

Updated September 3, 2021 at 10:57 AM ET

SEOUL — Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga effectively announced his resignation, after his handling of the coronavirus pandemic cost him public support and dimmed his party's prospects ahead of general elections this fall.

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New Zealand authorities were so worried about an Islamic extremist they were following him around-the-clock and were able to shoot and kill him within 60 seconds of him unleashing a frenzied knife attack that wounded six people Friday at an Auckland supermarket.

Three of the shoppers were taken to Auckland hospitals in critical condition, police said. Another was in serious condition, while two more were in moderate condition.

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Updated September 3, 2021 at 5:39 PM ET

Since the United States evacuated its embassy in Kabul following the Taliban takeover, diplomats have been setting up shop thousands of miles away — in Doha, Qatar.

The mission doesn't have a name yet, but it could serve as something of an embassy in exile for what was one of America's largest foreign diplomatic offices.

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It was only a matter of a few minutes — but the rules are the rules, and organizers say Malaysian shot putter Muhammad Ziyad Zolkefli became ineligible to compete after he arrived late to his event at the Tokyo Paralympics.

Zolkefli was allowed to compete in the event under protest on Tuesday, as Malaysia's delegation sought a way for him to defend the gold medal he won in Rio De Janeiro in 2016. He turned in the longest throw of the competition — in fact, his throw of 17.94 meters (58.85 feet) would have been good enough to win a gold medal and set a new world record.

Updated September 2, 2021 at 4:12 PM ET

RAMSTEIN, Germany — Hangar 5 at this giant U.S. air base can snugly fit some of the largest planes in the world. It was not meant to house people. But for the past two weeks as the United States conducts the largest airlift in its history, the base has hosted more than 25,000 Afghans waiting to be taken to America.

Sprinter Keula Nidreia Pereira Semedo won't be leaving the Paralympics with a medal. But she will be coming home with a fiancé, after a surprise track-side proposal from her running partner, Manuel Antonio Vaz da Veiga.

If the U.S. had done more to reduce its incarceration rate, it could have prevented millions of COVID-19 cases.

That's the conclusion of researchers who conducted what they say is the first study to link mass incarceration rates to pandemic vulnerability. Many of those preventable cases, they add, occurred in communities of color.

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