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The newly installed Taliban regime will forbid Afghan women from playing cricket and other sports where their bodies might be seen, a senior official told Australian public broadcaster SBS.

"I don't think women will be allowed to play cricket because it is not necessary that women should play cricket," said Ahmadullah Wasiq, deputy head of the Taliban's cultural commission, according to a translation by SBS.

In February, NPR published a story on the tolls of the pandemic on Thailand's sex workers. Before COVID-19 hit, international tourism made up 20% of the country's gross domestic product — and fueled a thriving sex industry. That collapsed in March 2020 when the country shut its borders to keep the coronavirus at bay.

A powerful earthquake struck near the Pacific resort city of Acapulco on Tuesday night, killing at least one person and causing buildings to rock and sway in Mexico City nearly 200 miles away.

This video from Mexico City's Azcapotzalco neighborhood shows startled occupants of an apartment rush to steady themselves and pets run for cover as the earthquake shakes their building, causing overhead light fittings to swing wildly.

So what have we learned in the 20 years since 9/11?

The Taliban takeover of Afghanistan encapsulated much of the past two decades. A war that began remarkably well for the U.S. had long since turned messy, frustrating and complicated, expanding to include a sprawling mix of goals and aspirations that never really went according to plan.

Two more victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center have been identified in New York City — just days before the nation marks the 20th anniversary of the tragedy.

Dorothy Morgan of Hempstead, N.Y., is the 1,646th victim to be identified through ongoing DNA analysis of unidentified remains recovered from the World Trade Center site, where 2,753 lives were lost. The second person — and the 1,647th victim — is a man whose name is being withheld at his family's request.

DEOBAND, India — Hundreds of young men in crisp white tunics and skullcaps sit cross-legged in classrooms ringed with porticoes, poring over Islamic texts. From a marble minaret above them, a dozen voices wail Quranic verse in unison.

They start and stop in rounds, echoing like a canon across an otherwise scruffy landscape of rickshaws, tea stalls and open sewers.

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El Salvador has become the first country in the world to make the cryptocurrency Bitcoin legal tender.

Advocates of the digital currency, including the country's president, Nayib Bukele, say the policy that took effect Tuesday morning was historic.

But the first few hours of Bitcoin's official status in El Salvador were marred by technological hiccups as the country opened its digital wallet app to residents and consumers for the first time.

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El Salvador this week officially became the first country in the world to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender. Tim Padgett of member station WLRN in Miami reports.

Updated September 7, 2021 at 7:12 PM ET

Mexico's Supreme Court has ruled that it is unconstitutional to punish abortion as a crime, a landmark ruling that clears the way for the legalization of abortion across the country.

The Dulles Expo Center outside Washington, D.C., is usually reserved for home and garden or gun shows. Now the cavernous center hosts thousands of Afghan refugees. It's wall to wall with cots and now includes a medical center and cafeteria — serving halal food — for the steady stream of people.

There are stacks of pillows and blankets, and soldiers and government workers walk through the crowd of men and women in traditional garb.

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Three weeks after taking over Afghanistan's capital city, Kabul, this morning, the Taliban have finally announced an interim government. NPR's Jackie Northam is covering it and joins us now. Jackie, thanks for being here.

Updated September 7, 2021 at 5:05 PM ET

On Wednesday, 20 men accused of planning and carrying out the largest peacetime attacks on French soil will go on trial in Paris.

Nearly six years ago, 10 attackers killed 130 people and wounded hundreds more in coordinated shootings and suicide bombings at the Bataclan concert hall, a sports stadium and bars and restaurants across the French capital. The ISIS attacks took place on an unusually balmy November Friday night in 2015, when outdoor café tables were full.

Jean-Pierre Adams, a European soccer star who had been in a coma for nearly four decades after a botched medical procedure, has died.

Paris Saint-Germain, one of Adams' former clubs, announced his death Monday in a statement on its website. He was 73.

"His love of life, charisma and experience quickly brought respect," said the club.

It also sent condolences to Adams' family and his wife, Bernadette, who cared for Adams at their home in the suburbs of Nîmes, in the south of France.

Updated September 9, 2021 at 9:10 AM ET

On Sept. 11, 2001, Said Noor was growing up in a mountain village in Khost, a southeastern province of Afghanistan along the border with Pakistan. He lived in an agricultural valley full of apple orchards and groves of peach trees.

On that day 20 years ago, Noor listened to BBC reports on the radio about a terrorist attack that took place halfway around the world.

"At the age of 11, I just had no idea what was going on," Noor, now 31, tells NPR.

Multiple planes meant to ferry hundreds of people who say they are fearful of life under the Taliban's rule, including American citizens and green card holders, spent another day parked on an airstrip in northern Afghanistan Monday.

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