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Susan Davis

Susan Davis is a congressional correspondent for NPR. She has covered Congress, elections, and national politics since 2002 for publications including USA TODAY, The Wall Street Journal, National Journal and Roll Call. She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss congressional and national politics, and she is a contributor on PBS's Washington Week with Robert Costa. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Philadelphia native.

Hillary Clinton's increasingly dominant lead in the presidential race is solidifying many Republicans' worst 2016 fears that Donald Trump will cost the party not only the White House but also control of the Senate.

"The bottom is starting to fall out a little earlier than expected," says a top Senate GOP campaign aide who requested anonymity to speak candidly about the state of the race. "We started off with a very difficult map. No matter what, this was going to be a very difficult year."

Updated at 11:49 a.m. to include reaction from Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump declined multiple opportunities to walk back his latest charge that President Obama founded the radical Islamic State terrorist organization.

In interviews Thursday morning with CNBC and the Hugh Hewitt Show, Trump said he did not regret the charge.

NPR was invited to observe two focus groups of swing voters from Ohio and Arizona on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. "Wal-Mart Moms" are identified by pollsters as women predominantly between the ages of 18 and 44, who have kids under 18 living at home and who shop at Wal-Mart stores at least once a month. In these groups, the women were identified only by their first names.

President Obama dismissed GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's comment this week that the election may be "rigged" this year.

Some party loyalists are scrambling to try to course correct Donald Trump's erratic presidential campaign after the nominee suffered a startling number of self-inflicted campaign wounds in just the kick-off week of the general election race.

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Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine clarified Sunday that his position on abortion rights is unmoved, despite top Clinton campaign aides' recent assertions otherwise.

"My voting position on abortion hasn't really changed," Kaine told CNN. "I support the Hyde Amendment. I haven't changed that."

While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

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Congress adjourns today for a seven-week summer break. Lawmakers passed a few bills, including a compromise between food producers and consumer advocates on genetically modified ingredients. We'll hear more about that in a moment.

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A dramatic scene played out on Capitol Hill over the last day. At the heart of it, the issue of guns. Democrats in the House of Representatives staged a sit-in on the floor of the chamber demanding a vote on gun control.

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House Democrats took over the floor of the House of Representatives overnight. This was in protest against congressional inaction on gun laws.

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Sen. Marco Rubio announced Wednesday he will run for re-election to his Florida seat. The onetime Republican presidential candidate pledged not to run again but has reconsidered. The Florida seat is considered a competitive one for the GOP in an election cycle in which the party's control of the Senate could be in jeopardy.

Reports of Marco Rubio's eagerness to leave the Senate may be greatly exaggerated.

After weeks of private lobbying, the Florida Republican senator now says he is considering running again. He has until June 24, his state's filing deadline, to make up his mind.

Rubio announced in April 2015 that he would not run for re-election to pursue his presidential bid. But his campaign never caught fire and he bowed out of the primaries after a disappointing finish in the Florida presidential primary.

One of the most famous magic tricks of all time would never have been possible without a certain Washington connection.

"When I wanted to make the Statue of Liberty disappear, the Parks Department says, 'We're not really comfortable with you doing that,'" magician David Copperfield recalls with a laugh. "I went to the president and said, 'Would you mind? I want to do this as a lesson in freedom.'"

With a little help from President Ronald Reagan in 1983, Copperfield made the 305-foot, 450,000-pound Statue of Liberty disappear and reappear on live national television.

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Outside a community shelter in Washington, DC's, historically black Anacostia neighborhood this morning, a group of House Republicans led by Speaker Paul Ryan unveiled a new anti-poverty plan.

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House Republicans kick off Tuesday a three-week roll out of a policy agenda that Speaker Paul Ryan says will outline what the party will do if they win the White House this November.

The agenda, dubbed "A Better Way," is Ryan's brainchild, a project that he negotiated as part of the deal that elevated him to House speaker last fall.

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It took a while, but House Speaker Paul Ryan has now endorsed Donald Trump for president. The leader of the Republican-controlled House has struggled to get there since Trump cleared the path to the nomination.

Lawmakers: They're just like us!

"Everyone's favorite parlor game right now in D.C. is who will be the vice presidential pick," Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairwoman Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., said at a briefing with reporters.

Every four years, the guessing game around the "veepstakes" reaches fever pitch right around now, when the nominating conventions are just weeks away. Democratic lawmakers are rich in opinions on whom Hillary Clinton should tap as her running mate.

House Speaker Paul Ryan shot down reports Wednesday that he was on the verge of endorsing Donald Trump for president.

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One of the surprise issues of this election cycle has been trade, and the big multilateral trade deal that's supposed to be a symbol of bipartisan cooperation may be on hold because of that. NPR congressional reporter Susan Davis has more.

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Donald Trump arrived in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to meet with his party's congressional leaders to hash out their differences and talk GOP unity ahead of what is likely to be a pitched general-election battle against Hillary Clinton.

First up was a private meeting with House Speaker Paul Ryan. The two arrived around 9 a.m. ET at the Republican National Committee in a session orchestrated by RNC Chairman Reince Priebus.

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A top party leader, a committee chairman with a deep understanding of national security, and an aspiring senator endorsed Donald Trump shortly after he secured his place as the de facto 2016 GOP presidential nominee.

It's as sure a sign as any that the party is falling in line behind the New York businessman as he prepares to face off against Hillary Clinton in the general election. Even if their hearts are not in it.

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The Republican National Committee delegates and the three presidential campaigns jockeying for their votes huddled here in Hollywood, Fla., for its last formal party meeting ahead of the July convention in Cleveland.

While Donald Trump's convincing New York primary win boosts his chances at winning the nomination outright, the potential for an open, contested convention lingers.

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