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Juneteenth celebrations are underway across the United States, commemorating the 156th anniversary of the date that is often considered the end of chattel slavery in the country.

Events this year come two days after President Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law, which is the latest national holiday to be recognized since Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 1983.

According to the Brennan Center, 1 in 3 election officials feel unsafe because of their job. NPR's Sarah McCammon talks to Philadelphia City Commissioner Al Schmidt about the threats he's received.

Voting rights has become the latest partisan fight on Capitol Hill. NPR's Sarah McCammon talks to election law expert Spencer Overton about how we got here and what's at stake in the debate.

The discovery of childrens' remains at an Indian boarding school in Canada is drawing new attention to the children sent to such schools in the United States.

Your Life Advice For NPR's 50th Birthday

2 hours ago

In honor of NPR's 50th birthday, we asked listeners who have reached that milestone for some life advice. Hundreds answered.

An historic drought is hitting the western U.S. Phil Chang, a commissioner for Deschutes County, Oregon tells NPR's Sarah McCammon about how his community is coping.

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This week marks the 50th anniversary of the war on drugs. And today, we'll visit two communities that found themselves on the frontlines. Huntington, W.V., and Brownsville, N.Y., were hit hard by drug addiction. They're also places where people say drug war policies left deep scars. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann reports.

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Heroin started rewiring and taking control of Will's brain in the early 2000s, as he turned 40.

"Back then, if you used drugs people didn't want anything to do with you," Will recalls. "People gave up on me."

Will lost almost everything: jobs, his driver's license, his car, his marriage and his home. He found enough temporary work to pay rent on a room, ate at soup kitchens, and stole and resold goods for cash.

"Feeding that addiction," he says. "Feeding that monster."

Every time Shani Damron, 34, buys methamphetamines or heroin on the streets of Huntington, W.Va., she knows the risk is extreme.

"That fentanyl is no joke," Damron said, referring to the deadly synthetic opioid that now contaminates much of the illegal drug supply in the United States. "Every time we stick a needle in our arm, we're taking a 50-50 chance. We could die."

There's also a high risk of disease from contaminated needles shared by drug users. Damron's community has seen a major HIV/AIDS outbreak.

It might be tempting to shrug at the scorching weather across large swaths of the West. This just in: It gets hot in the summer.

But this record-setting heat wave's remarkable power, size and unusually early appearance is giving meteorologists and climate experts yet more cause for concern about the routinization of extreme weather in an era of climate change.

These sprawling, persistent high-pressure zones popularly called "heat domes" are relatively common in later summer months. This current system is different.

This week, President Biden signed into law the "Juneteenth National Independence Day."

It is honoring the work of Black Americans, including people such as 94-year-old Civil Rights Activist Opal Lee, who had long advocated for the celebration that started in Galveston to be made a federal holiday.

The Justice Department has released a trove of videos, including police body-worn camera footage, allegedly showing assaults against police officers defending the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

The videos, made available after NPR and other media organizations filed a legal motion for their release, are further evidence of the violent nature of the Capitol riot and are cited as evidence in the assault cases against Thomas Webster and Scott Fairlamb.

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The United States is importing historic amounts of stuff from overseas, causing the U.S. trade deficit to hit record highs. Greg Rosalsky from our Planet Money podcast reports the shipping industry is having trouble handling all of it.

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The United States is importing historic amounts of stuff from overseas, causing the U.S. trade deficit to hit record highs. Greg Rosalsky from our Planet Money podcast reports the shipping industry is having trouble handling all of it.

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The Personal Cost Of Solitary Confinement

Jun 18, 2021

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The United States is importing historic amounts of stuff from overseas, causing the U.S. trade deficit to hit record highs. Greg Rosalsky from our Planet Money podcast reports the shipping industry is having trouble handling all of it.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The United States is importing historic amounts of stuff from overseas, causing the U.S. trade deficit to hit record highs. Greg Rosalsky from our Planet Money podcast reports the shipping industry is having trouble handling all of it.

Numbers drive baseball, a game whose managers, analysts and fans obsess over matchups, tendencies and results. Its box scores, those proto-spreadsheets, instantly turn human accomplishments into history. The quest is for clean, comparable data.

But for decades, the human aspect of the game — specifically, the racism that pro baseball both reflected and perpetuated — clouded that data. While the feats of white players were carefully recorded and celebrated, the accomplishments of Black players in the Negro Leagues were set apart or forgotten entirely.

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