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Shannon Bond

An open letter urging Spotify to crack down on COVID-19 misinformation has gained the signatures of more than a thousand doctors, scientists and health professionals spurred by growing concerns over anti-vaccine rhetoric on the audio app's hit podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience.

It's been called the Great Deplatforming. In the hours and days after the U.S. Capitol insurrection on Jan.

The tumult began in early January 2021 for social media companies. The attack on the U.S. Capitol led Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to kick off then-President Donald Trump.

The parent company of Facebook and Instagram has banned seven firms it says used its platforms to spy on some 50,000 unsuspecting targets, including human rights activists, government critics, celebrities, journalists and ordinary people in more than 100 countries.

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Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, knew he faced a tough audience at a Senate hearing yesterday.

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Instagram is rolling out a new set of safety features aimed at its youngest users and their parents, a day before the photo-sharing app's head testifies to Congress about the platform's potential risks to kids and teens.

They include tools to help users manage how much time they spend on the app, place limits on both unwanted interactions with adults and exposure to sensitive content, and offer optional parental oversight of children's accounts.

The parent company of Facebook and Instagram said on Wednesday it has taken down more than 600 accounts, pages and groups connected to a Chinese influence operation spreading COVID-19 disinformation, including an account purporting to be a fictitious Swiss biologist.

When Jack Dorsey abruptly stepped down as Twitter CEO on Monday, he handed the reins to Parag Agrawal, a software engineer who has become one of Dorsey's closest allies in shaping the social media company's future.

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Jack Dorsey is stepping down as CEO of Twitter, the social media company he co-founded in 2006. He will be replaced by Twitter's chief technology officer, Parag Agrawal, a 10-year veteran of the company.

Twitter stock rose on the news, which was first reported by CNBC.

"I've decided to leave Twitter because I believe the company is ready to move on from its founders," Dorsey said in a statement. "My trust in Parag as Twitter's CEO is deep. His work over the past 10 years has been transformational. I'm deeply grateful for his skill, heart, and soul. It's his time to lead."

The parent company of Facebook and Instagram is looking into whether its platforms treat users differently based on race, after years of criticism particularly from Black users and its own employees about racial bias.

"There are a lot of members of systemically and historically marginalized communities who feel that their experience on our platforms is different," said Roy Austin Jr., vice president of civil rights at Meta, formerly known as Facebook.

A bipartisan group of state attorneys general is investigating how Instagram attracts and potentially harms children and young adults.

The probe follows revelations from a whistleblower about how Instagram's parent company Meta, formerly known as Facebook, has studied the risks of the photo-sharing app to its youngest users, including exacerbating body image issues for some teenage girls.

Sean Buchan has started every day of the past two weeks at his computer, tracking narratives about the COP26 U.N. climate summit.

He looks for claims like one about the electric cars ferrying dignitaries around Glasgow being powered by diesel generators. That isn't true: the cars were recharged by generators burning lower-emission vegetable oil.

The parent company of Facebook will no longer let advertisers target people based on how interested the social network thinks they are in "sensitive" topics including health, race and ethnicity, political affiliation, religion and sexual orientation.

Meta, which makes most of its $86 billion in annual sales from advertising, said it's making the "difficult decision" in an effort to stop advertisers from using ad targeting to discriminate against or otherwise harm users.

The parent company of Facebook and Instagram has released data for the first time showing how often people see bullying or harassing posts on its apps, amid scrutiny over how its social networks may be harming users and society at large.

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OK. Facebook has a new name. CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced today that the company is rebranding itself as Meta. It'll be built on a futuristic, immersive social experience known as the metaverse.

Updated October 28, 2021 at 3:30 PM ET

Facebook's new corporate name is Meta, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on Thursday, in an apparent effort to recast the company's public image from battered social network to tech innovator focused on building the next generation of online interaction, known as the "metaverse."

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Hours after polls closed on Nov. 3, angry Donald Trump supporters on Facebook coalesced around a rallying cry now synonymous with the siege on the U.S. Capitol: "Stop the Steal."

Inside Facebook, employees were watching with concern.

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A Facebook whistleblower told Congress it's time to regulate the social media company.

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Addictive, disastrous, putting profits before people - these are words that a former Facebook employee used today in testimony before Congress about the social media company.

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