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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

David Greene talks to Kimberly Wehle, who served as associate independent counsel during the Whitewater probe, and former federal prosecutor Shan Wu on what to expect from the redacted Mueller report.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Virginia Hall is one of the most important American spies most people have never heard of.

Her story is on display at the CIA Museum inside the spy agency headquarters in Langley, Va. — but this is off-limits to the public.

"She was the most highly decorated female civilian during World War II," said Janelle Neises, the museum's deputy director, who's providing a tour.

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We're expecting a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report to be released tomorrow. Lawmakers and the public alike will get the chance to read for themselves what the special counsel unearthed, disregarded and concluded. And while fights over the report are going to keep going, this release is the culmination of investigations that go back nearly three years, reaching across continents and into President Trump's inner circle. NPR justice reporter Ryan Lucas takes us back to the beginning.

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This summer, musician Katie Sucha will be touring England. And she's scared.

"It really is a serious mental challenge to walk through those doors and get on the plane," she explains. Sucha's fear of flying is so bad that when she was a teacher in Mississippi and wanted to visit her family in Michigan, she'd take a 14-hour bus ride rather than spend two hours in the air.

After years of tension over expanded oil and gas drilling, including a deadly explosion that galvanized critics, Colorado is moving to tighten regulations on the booming industry. In a sweeping overhaul the governor is expected to sign, regulators will now have to consider public health, safety and the environment in decisions about permitting and local land use.

The state must still hammer out the details of how to implement the new law over the next year. But the impending changes are already fueling hope for some, and fear for others.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "7 RINGS")

ARIANA GRANDE: (Singing) Buy myself all of my favorite things...

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Construction began on Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris more than 800 years ago. Last night, Parisians gathered near that cathedral, hoping there is enough left to rebuild. They prayed, and they sang.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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It seems like every week a video shared on social media shows some incredibly early achiever: a 5-year-old playing a piano concerto; an 11-year-old college graduate; the preteen sports prodigy.

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In Sudan, the ruling military council has said they are willing to negotiate with the opposition. But demonstrators in the capital of that country, Khartoum, continue to protest. As Halima Gikandi reports, they say their demands have not yet been met.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Here's a little encouragement for last-minute tax filers: Your chance of being audited by the IRS this year is as low as it has been in decades.

Years of budget cuts have hollowed out enforcement of the nation's tax laws. Now, even the Trump administration says those cuts may have gone too far.

Adjusted for inflation, IRS funding has been cut by about 25 percent since the beginning of the decade. And staffing for tax enforcement has fallen by nearly a third.

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So over the weekend, we saw a record-breaking launch that will hopefully change the way we send satellites into space.

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