KTEP - El Paso, Texas

Science Studio

Sundays at 7pm

Science Studio is a fascinating 30-minute look into the ever progressing world of science. For nearly fifteen years, the show has taken in depth looks into all aspects of scientific researches and discoveries. Hosts Dr. Keith Pannell and Dr. Russell Chianelli, discuss their concerns on health and the environment. With two educated science connoisseurs, Science Studio helps you understand the inner workings of today’s science.

Science Studio also features Medical Discovery News, a weekly program that provide insights into a broad range of biomedical science topics. Biomedical science is research that addresses human health – from the study of important molecules, to clinical trials of new drugs and therapies. The story of these areas is a window on the future of medicine. We will also offer important basic information about your health. Our hope is that these episodes stimulate you to think, question and appreciate how science impacts you and your world. Medical Discovery News is produced by the University of Texas Medical Branch. 

Lane Martin is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Martin's work focuses on developing materials that will change the way we live. In particular, he works on the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of advanced functional electronic materials. Ultimately his research is aimed at enabling dream applications in areas ranging from new modes of computation, memory and data storage, energy conversion, sensing and transduction, actuation, and much more.

Dr. Steve Patterson is a professor of the Center for Drug Design at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Patterson’s research is particularly interested in creating an antidote for cyanide. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning are slow acting and can have serious life-threatening side effects. His research team is developing a series of antidotes that use an enzyme that converts cyanide to a non-toxic substance. His results have shown that these antidotes are more effective than current treatments available. Dr. Patterson continues to work on expanding this series of antidotes, to improve their efficacy in reversing cyanide toxicity, and to move these potential treatments into clinical trials.

Dr. Teresa Ubide at the University of Queensland. Dr. Ubide is a volcanologist with a passion for understanding why, how and when volcanic eruptions start. She studies a wide range of active and past volcanic systems in different tectonic settings around the world, and her current research focuses on minerals hosted in volcanic rocks, as they provide a detailed record of the processes leading to eruptions.

This week, we began a new season by welcoming Dr. Eric Scerri, author, chemist and a leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. Dr. Scerri's research includes chemical education and historical-philosophical questions such as the reduction of chemistry to quantum mechanics. He continues to work on the foundations of the periodic table, including whether it makes sense to speak of an ‘optimal’ table and the form such a table might take.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED JANUARY 21, 2018-

Dr. Andrew Doust is a professor of Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, OK. While host Keith Pannell was on travels, he had the opportunity to speak to Dr. Doust about his field of interest as well as his most recent research findings. Dr. Doust primarily studies the evolution of plant morphology. His lab projects include the evolution of plant architecture in grasses, developmental genetics of domestication evens in foxtail millet and other grasses, and evolution of fruit shape and of seed oils.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED APRIL 1, 2018-

James Day is an Associate Professor in the Geosciences Research Division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. James is a geologist and geochemist whose research focuses on volcanism and what the mineralogy and composition of rocks can tell about how the planets formed and evolved to their present-day states. He studies asteroids and products formed in the mantle of Mars, the Earth, and the Moon, and on this week's Science Studio we got to discuss all his areas of interests and expertise.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED JANUARY 7, 2018-

While host Keith Pannell was on the road, he visited with Dr. Duane Gill, Professor and Head of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. His areas of specialization include disasters and contaminated communities. Dr. Gill has conducted research understand social and psychological impacts of the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Alaska and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in coastal Alabama. Dr. Gill was part of a research team employed by the Gitga’at First Nation in British Columbia to assess potential impacts of an oil spill associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project. He discusses his recent studies on natural disasters and the impacts communities can face in terms of social impact.

University of Notre Dame Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases

-ORIGINALLY AIRED DECEMBER 31, 2017-

Dr. Vernon Carruthers is a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Carruthers' expertise on parasites seeks to understand survival strategies employed by microbial pathogens during infection. We discuss his recent studies and discoveries on parasites on this edition of Science Studio.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED OCTOBER 29, 2017-

Kent Gates, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Missouri, visits us in-studio to enlighten us on his latest research on DNA. It's a very fundamental piece of research about how we can control the degradation of our own DNA.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED DECEMBER 3, 2017-

Have you ever noticed you tend to feel energized and drowsy around the same times every day? Your 24-hour internal clock, that's running in the background of your brain, cycles between sleepiness and alertness at regular intervals and it’s known as your circadian rhythm. Dr. Seung-Hee Yoo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of McGoven Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Russ Chianelli speaks with her as they discuss her field of study in circadian rhythms. 

-ORIGINALLY AIRED NOVEMBER 19, 2017-

If you were an incoming freshman and saw a sign that said "Spit for Science," what would you think? This week we visit with Dr. Danielle Dick, Virginia Commonwealth University, as she shares details about her research. She focuses on how genetic and environmental influences contribute to the development of patterns of substance use and related behaviors, such as childhood conduct problems and depression, and how we can use that information to inform prevention and intervention.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED NOVEMBER 5, 2017-

Javier Read de Alaniz is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Associate Director of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Alaniz is interested in a wide range of fundamental and applied chemistry that extends from the development of new synthetic transformations to the creation of a novel class of organic photochromic material. His particular interest, however, is in harnessing the synthetic utility of highly reactive intermediates for development of new bond-forming reactions used in synthesis and material science.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED OCTOBER 15, 2017-

Robert Scherrer is Professor and Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Vanderbilt University. We discuss his work and research on dark matter, dark energy, and Robert's other interest and profession as a science fiction writer.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED SEPTEMBER 17, 2017-

Hector A. Garcia is a psychologist with the Valley Coastal Bend Veterans Health Care System. In his work as a researcher, Garcia examines barriers to PTSD care, masculine identity and its impact on PTSD treatment-seeking, and how occupational burnout impacts PTSD care providers, who daily hear detailed accounts of trauma. This week, our discussion with Mr. Garcia enlightens us on the history of P.T.S.D. and the treatments that have been discovered to be very useful in treating our veterans and other affected individuals.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED SEPTEMBER 10, 2017-

This week, we continue our "Best Of" series by featuring our conversation with Professor Thilo Hoffman from the Department of Environmental Geosciences at the University of Vienna. Hofmann is studying the role of nanoparticles in water. Are they harmful? Is it easy to remove them? How would we remove them? To answer some of these questions, listen in to this edition of Science Studio.

-ORIGINALLY AIRED OCTOBER 22, 2017-

Every summer Science Studio likes to take a little break and look back on all the guests from this season. This week, we begin our "Best Of" selection by revisiting our conversation with Sara Seager, an astrophysicist and planetary scientist at MIT, who has dedicated her research on theory, computation, and data analysis of exoplanets. Her research has introduced many new ideas to the field of exoplanet characterization, including work that led to the first detection of an exoplanet atmosphere.

Michael Campbell is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Howard University. This week, we discussed Campbell's ongoing research in a very prominent, and very delicate, topic - what's the color of your skin have to do with race? Campbell's research team aims to understand the genetic basis of complex diseases that disproportionately affect African and African American populations. His main research interest revolved around studying the levels and patterns of African diversity to expand current knowledge concerning relationships among African populations, demographic history and modern human origins.

Dr. Margarita Echeverri is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences at Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy. She serves as the Educational Coordinator in Health Disparities, Cultural Diversity Competence, and Health Literacy in the Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities Research and Education at the university and this week, we spoke with Dr. Echeverri about the development of her career and how it lead to her health disparity research efforts. 

Peter C. Ford is a Professor from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Mr. Ford's research has encompassed topics related to the photochemistry, catalytic reactions, and mechanisms of transition metal complexes. The Ford Research Group is focused on sustainable methodologies for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemical precursors , the photochemical studies involve the application of nanomaterials to collect light and to transfer energy to metal complexes that release certain bioactive agents, and the third area of research is concerned with evaluating the quantitative chemical reactivities of small molecule bioregulators with biologically relevant metal centers.

Pouyan Nejadhashemi is an Associate Professor of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at Michigan State University. He's an authority on water and is particularly interested in water conservation. His latest research project is aimed at enhancing the understanding of how water interacts with upland soils, slopes, and land-management practices to impact water quantity and quality yields to streams and ultimately to reservoirs, and how these interact with unique combinations of lithology, soils, vegetation, micro-climate, and land toward achieving an environmentally sustainable and economically efficient system.

Héctor D. Abruña is a professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University. This week, we discussed Abruña's current research efforts that takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of electrochemical phenomena. Abruña's research group addresses problems of electrochemical interest, from fundamental studies of battery and fuel cell systems to molecular electronics.

Stanley Engle, NMSU

In September of 2017, Dr. Keith Pannel met with Dr. David Dubois, Dr. Michael DeAntonio, and Dr. Gary Morris to discuss their latest collaborative project is centered around testing air quality and ozone levels through the use of weather balloons. This week, Dr. Gary Morris returned to our studio to give our audience an update on their discoveries as well as where the study will go from here.

Part I of this conversation can be found here.

Michael Strano is the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We discussed his latest research interests and discoveries, which include his ongoing research into Plant Nanobionics. 

UCLA

Sir Fraser Stoddart received the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry jointly with Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Bernard L. Feringa for their design and production of molecular machines. We had the honor of welcoming Mr. Stoddart to our studio to discuss his work leading up to the prize, as well as what came to follow in his most recent research discoveries.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego

James Day is an Associate Professor in the Geosciences Research Division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. James is a geologist and geochemist whose research focuses on volcanism and what the mineralogy and composition of rocks can tell about how the planets formed and evolved to their present-day states. He studies asteroids and products formed in the mantle of Mars, the Earth, and the Moon, and on this week's Science Studio we got to discuss all his areas of interests and expertise. 

Dr. Ryan M. Richards is a professor of chemistry at the Colorado School of Mines, currently making discoveries in what he likes to call his 'catalytic playground.'  The interface of the fields of catalysis and nanoscale materials is at the forefront of the quest for a sustainable future. Dr. Richards' research group is exploring the interface of nanoscale materials and catalysis by pursuing new methods to manipulate the preparation of materials at the nanoscale, examining the structure/activity relationships these materials exhibit, apply the nano-engineered materials in a spectrum of catalytic reactions to determine how their properties affect the process, combining in situ spectroscopy and modeling to gain mechanistic information, and collaborate with theoreticians and other instrumental specialists to develop a theoretical understanding of the properties associated with preparing and applying these systems in catalytic processes.

Dr. William R. Stockwell is an emeritus professor at Howard University Department of Chemistry and is currently doing some collaborative research in El Paso studying the atmosphere. Dr. Stockwell has made several fundamental discoveries in atmospheric chemistry through laboratory, computer modeling, and field experiments. He is an internationally recognized expert in Eulerian air quality models.

Roberto Cao, professor of science at the University of Havana, was this week's guest and discussed how he got his start in science as well, as well as what led him to his particular interest in nitric oxide. 

Susan M. Lunte, of the University of Kansas Department of Chemistry, visits with us and discusses her area of expertise and recent studies. Lunte’s research group focuses on microanalytical methods and microchip-based diagnostics for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

Sue Lunte Research Group

-ORIGINALLY AIRED JANUARY 8, 2017-

Alejandro Briseño, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Polymer Science and Engineering, shares the groundbreaking work his research team has achieved through the study of organic and polymer semiconductor single crystals, polymer semiconductor devices and synthesis of novel organic and polymer semiconductors.

Pages