KTEP - El Paso, Texas

2019 El Paso Pro-Musica Bach's Lunch Series

Join KTEP on Sunday January 20 at 2pm for the first 2019 El Paso Pro-Musica Bach's Lunch concert featuring the Vega String Quartet and Pianist William Ransom. The performance was recorded on January 10, 2019 at the El Paso Museum of Art.

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pigment is a material that changes the color of reflected or transmitted light as the result of wavelength-selective absorption. Dr. Keith Pannell welcomes Professor Tim Hanusa of Vanderbilt University to discuss the history of color and pigments.

It seems like there's an "Idiot's Guide" to everything. But one of the most important books in this series is a collaboration between a registered dietician and a former NASA scientist. This week, we visited with Julieanna Hever and Ray Chronise, co-authors of the book Plant-Based Nutrition: The Idiot's Guide Series to discuss all the wealth of information on the most nutrient-dense foods, genuine supplement needs, and more. This helpful guide gives you everything you need to know about the advantages of a plant-based diet.

Host, Daniel Chacon talks with author, Daniel Pena about his new book, Bang.

Our border region remains under the watchful eye of people in Mexico and the United States. Louie Saenz and Angela Kocherga talk about the government shutdown, President Trump’s demands to build a border wall, and what newly elected Mexican President, Amador Manuel Lopez Obrador, has done to help Mexican workers in Juarez. 

Elaine Molinar is a partner and Managing Director of Snøhetta - The Americas, the firm chosen to design the El Paso Children's Museum.  

 Snøhetta is an interdisciplinary design studio which takes an integrative approach to architecture, landscape, and interior architecture. Here to talk design and our upcoming children's museum is Elaine Molinar.

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The historic government shutdown is beginning to stir anxiety in and around Paradise, Calif. The town of about 25,000 people was almost completely destroyed by a deadly wildfire last November and almost everyone and everything directly affected is relying heavily on federal aid.

So far FEMA and Small Business Administration loans do not appear to be affected. But local officials say the shutdown is causing delays in more under-the-radar infrastructure projects, which could have serious, longterm consequences.

While Shakespeare's Romeo spent only about two days banished in Mantua, away from his beloved Juliet, Romeo the frog has remained in complete isolation — sans love interest, cousins, friars or friends — living in a laboratory for the last 10 years. But that's all about to change.

Muhammed Ali's hometown of Louisville, Ky., has renamed its airport in honor of the boxer-turned-activist who died in 2016.

The Louisville Regional Airport Authority board announced its decision on Wednesday to call the airport the Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport.

The U.S. State Department has identified the American killed Tuesday in a terrorist attack on a luxury hotel in Nairobi, Kenya, as Jason Spindler of Houston.

In a statement issued late Wednesday, Deputy spokesman Robert Palladino said,

In the fourth week of a partial government shutdown that has left more than 800,000 federal employees furloughed or working without pay, there's at least one tiny consolation: Free beer.

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NPR Politics

Two portraits of William Barr emerged during the second day of his confirmation hearing to lead the Justice Department as President Trump's choice as attorney general.

One was of a brilliant and moral man who oversaw the resolution of a hostage crisis at a federal prison without any casualties and another was of an early 1990s attorney general who held views on race and policing that now seem antiquated and unacceptable to many in law enforcement.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The oceans are filling up with plastic trash; much of it is packaging material. So environmentalists are demanding that corporations that sell consumer goods find new packaging that doesn't last for decades or even centuries. As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports, the movement is germinating in the Philippines, and it's led by a man who calls himself a simple island boy.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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NPR Business News

Updated at 1:00 a.m. ET Thursday

Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard who created the first index mutual fund for individual investors in 1975, died Wednesday at the age of 89, the company said.

Bogle transformed the way people invest. He believed that investors should own a mix of bonds and stocks but shouldn't pay investment managers to pick them.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated at 8:59 p.m. ET

Officials leasing the Old Post Office Building for the Trump International Hotel in Washington improperly ignored the Constitution's anti-corruption clauses when they continued to lease the government property to President Trump even after he won the White House, according to an internal federal government watchdog.

There are plenty of reasons why the U.S. economy could slip into recession within the next couple of years. There's the trade war with China, slowing economic growth, rising interest rates, dysfunction in the government, and the prospect of fading stimulus.

But what about the other side? What about the case for optimism? Economist Jared Bernstein, an old friend of the show, got in touch because he thinks we shouldn't neglect the positive economic signals that he's seeing right now.

The partial government shutdown is inflicting far greater damage on the U.S. economy than the Trump administration previously estimated, the White House acknowledged.

President Trump's economists have now doubled projections of how much economic growth is being lost each week.

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I missed Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. Skipped The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Not that I couldn't use the help! But because I was always a little skeptical — if these books work, why do we need so many of them? Couldn't we all just read one and be sorted? Marianne Power was similarly skeptical, but she also says she found herself, at age 36, convinced her life was in a rut and not quite sure how to climb out of it.

"I loved my mother and she died. Is that a story?"

Yes, it is the story that Sarah McColl tells in her memoir, Joy Enough. Embedded in the question, which is the first line of the book, is McColl herself — how she grew up in the family that her mother Allison created, how she entered adulthood and married, how her marriage fell apart as Allison was dying.

McColl knows Allison didn't cry when her own mother died:

What's more of a turn-on than sweat and rivalry? Not much — which is at least part of the reason why a healthy strain of sports-centric titles has long flourished in the world of Japanese manga. Whatever your game, you can almost certainly find a translated import: from baseball (Ace of Diamond) and soccer (Giant Killing) to less expected sports like ballroom dancing (Welcome to the Ballroom) and even the board game Go (the legendary Hikaru no Go). Though these series revolve around competitions, winning is really beside the point.

A sitcom lucky enough to reach its fifth season has managed to navigate its vulnerable infancy, its nervous childhood, its awkward adolescence and its halting young-adulthood. Like most of us at that stage of life, it knows what it is — enough to convincingly fake it, anyway — and it can finally get on with the business of being that.

College is done, the world beckons, they're at peak confidence and vitality. The hard work's over, right? Smooth sailing!

Wrong. The real work is only beginning.

Lights! Camera! 2019!

Jan 15, 2019

2018 had a lot to offer, cinematically. Superhero movies had a snappy year with Black Panther, Aquaman, Into the Spider-Verse and the first in a two-part Avengers epic (also a Deadpool sequel hit theaters twice). A Quiet Place and Annihilation were suspenseful successes with many critics. Eighth Grade, If Beale Street Could Talk and Won’t You Be My Neighbor reminded us that crying isn’t always optional.

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The historic government shutdown is beginning to stir anxiety in and around Paradise, Calif. The town of about 25,000 people was almost completely destroyed by a deadly wildfire last November and almost everyone and everything directly affected is relying heavily on federal aid.

So far FEMA and Small Business Administration loans do not appear to be affected. But local officials say the shutdown is causing delays in more under-the-radar infrastructure projects, which could have serious, longterm consequences.

While Shakespeare's Romeo spent only about two days banished in Mantua, away from his beloved Juliet, Romeo the frog has remained in complete isolation — sans love interest, cousins, friars or friends — living in a laboratory for the last 10 years. But that's all about to change.

Muhammed Ali's hometown of Louisville, Ky., has renamed its airport in honor of the boxer-turned-activist who died in 2016.

The Louisville Regional Airport Authority board announced its decision on Wednesday to call the airport the Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport.

The U.S. State Department has identified the American killed Tuesday in a terrorist attack on a luxury hotel in Nairobi, Kenya, as Jason Spindler of Houston.

In a statement issued late Wednesday, Deputy spokesman Robert Palladino said,

In the fourth week of a partial government shutdown that has left more than 800,000 federal employees furloughed or working without pay, there's at least one tiny consolation: Free beer.

As the Trump administration demands funding for a border wall to stop illegal immigration, a new study finds that for the seventh consecutive year, visa overstays far exceeded unauthorized border crossings.

The report released Wednesday by the Center for Migration Studies of New York finds that from 2016-2017, visa overstayers accounted for 62 percent of the newly undocumented, while 38 percent had crossed a border illegally.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The oceans are filling up with plastic trash; much of it is packaging material. So environmentalists are demanding that corporations that sell consumer goods find new packaging that doesn't last for decades or even centuries. As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports, the movement is germinating in the Philippines, and it's led by a man who calls himself a simple island boy.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sniffles, sore throats and fevers seem to be all around lately.

If things get bad enough for you or a loved one to seek care, what are your expectations about treatment? Do you want a prescription for an antibiotic if symptoms suggest an infection?

Two portraits of William Barr emerged during the second day of his confirmation hearing to lead the Justice Department as President Trump's choice as attorney general.

One was of a brilliant and moral man who oversaw the resolution of a hostage crisis at a federal prison without any casualties and another was of an early 1990s attorney general who held views on race and policing that now seem antiquated and unacceptable to many in law enforcement.

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