KTEP - El Paso, Texas

WORDS ON A WIRE: Joshua Rubin & Laurie Ann Guerrero

Host Tim Hernandez interviews Joshua Rubin and Former Texas State Poet Laureate, Laurie Ann Guerrero about the Children's Detention Center in Tornillo, Texas.

Read More

Latest from KTEP

Dr. Pannell discusses the importantance of local zoo's in our environment with El Paso Zoo veterinarian and director Steve Marshall and Victoria Milne. They talk about the survival of certain rare species and what you can do to help.

NY Times Bestselling author Delia Owens discusses her life as a wildlife scientist in Africa.  She has just released her first novel titled Where the Crawdads Sing.

Host Tim Hernandez interviews Joshua Rubin and Former Texas State Poet Laureate, Laurie Ann Guerrero about the Children's Detention Center in Tornillo, Texas.

On December 1, 2018, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was sworn in as Mexico’s 79th President. He received 53 percent of the vote in July, and now he is charged with fixing the economy, immigration and dealing with violence and corruption. 

 Rice University’s, Dr. Tony Payan, talks about what Lopez Obrador has inherited and how he will deal with some of those issues including addressing border issues with the United States. 

Thirty original 2-minute plays. One 60-minute timer. The audience orders the plays they want to see off of a menu in the program. The show ends when all 30 plays are finished or the 60 minute timer runs out. 

 The Border Theatre and The Rio Grande Writers' Room are proud to present Icarus was a Rookie, an interactive evening of performance, play, and community. 

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

Lawmakers unveiled the much-anticipated farm bill compromise Monday night, ending the months-long impasse over whether a critical piece of legislation that provides subsidies to farmers and helps needy Americans buy groceries could pass before the lame-duck session concludes at the end of the year.

Does mistletoe give you the creeps? Wish that eggnog and fruitcake had never been invented? Would life be better if you never had to wrap another present?

NPR's All Things Considered is doing a story about holiday traditions you absolutely hate and wish would just go away. Have a tradition in particular that you loathe entirely? Tell us about it.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As President Trump continues to threaten to potentially shut down the government over his border wall, Americans would prefer to see him compromise to prevent gridlock, according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll.

By a 21-point margin — 57 percent to 36 percent — Americans think the president should compromise on the wall to avoid a government shutdown, rather than stand firm. About two-thirds of Republicans say the opposite, and the president has been focused on maintaining his base.

More News

NPR Politics

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Back in 2012, Donald Trump, who was then a private citizen, wrote a tweet mocking President Obama.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

In a testy Oval Office exchange with the two top congressional Democrats, Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Chuck Schumer, President Trump made clear he would be "proud" to shut down the government in less than two weeks if he doesn't get funding for his border wall.

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET

Google CEO Sundar Pichai made his public debut before Congress on Tuesday, spending much of his testimony countering Republicans' allegations of anti-conservative bias in the company's search results.

He also faced scrutiny of how much data Google collects on users and on the company's work on a censored search tool for China.

The Google+ social network inadvertently gave app developers access to information on some 52.5 million users — even data that users designated as private — because of a "bug" in its software, Google says. The company had already announced it was pulling the plug on the social network because of an earlier incident, and now says the shutdown will happen four months sooner.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

For December, 3 Romantic Holiday Escapes

Dec 11, 2018

'Tis the season when an escape from holiday madness may be necessary --and these three romance novels will whisk you away to fictional worlds where all the high stakes drama is resolved with true love and happily ever after.

Many of the best of this year's books were graced with humor and distinguished by deep dives into American identity. It was also a very good year for deceased authors whose posthumously published books were so much more than mere postscripts to their careers. Rebecca Makkai's The Great Believers -- a sweeping story about the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and its long aftermath — is my pick for novel of the year.

My guess is that you've never read a book quite like Heather Rose's The Museum of Modern Love. I know I haven't. This is the Australian author's seventh novel, though it's her first published in the United States, and it's a real find.

"I'm fascinated by the necessity of quick decisions," Inge Morath told me more than 30 years ago, when she came to NPR for an interview. Morath was in the business of quick decisions — as a photographer and photojournalist she was the first woman to be accepted as a full member of the Magnum photo agency.

Now, her life is the subject of a new biography by Linda Gordon. It recounts Morath's escape from Nazi Germany, her boundary-breaking career, and her marriage to playwright Arthur Miller.

At the movies, 2018 was the year of Black Panther, the year of more Incredibles and Avengers, more Star Wars and Mission: Impossible. But it was also the year of intimate stories of youth and love. It was the year of period pieces and fantasies, crushing tragedies and raucous comedies. Bob Mondello, Linda Holmes and Glen Weldon would never agree on a single list of best movies of the year. But here are 15 of the movies we admired and will remember.

Black Panther

More NPR Arts News

Dr. Pannell discusses the importantance of local zoo's in our environment with El Paso Zoo veterinarian and director Steve Marshall and Victoria Milne. They talk about the survival of certain rare species and what you can do to help.

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET

Google CEO Sundar Pichai made his public debut before Congress on Tuesday, spending much of his testimony countering Republicans' allegations of anti-conservative bias in the company's search results.

He also faced scrutiny of how much data Google collects on users and on the company's work on a censored search tool for China.

Maxine Funke writes songs for the quiet corners of your dreams and fears, where her whispers float upward like warm air. Accompanied by an acoustic guitar and an odd noise here or there, she evokes tenderhearted singer-songwriters like Sibylle Baier and Vashti Bunyan, but also the subtle and strange songs of fellow New Zealander Alastair Galbraith, with whom she performed in the short-lived $100 Band.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Google+ social network inadvertently gave app developers access to information on some 52.5 million users — even data that users designated as private — because of a "bug" in its software, Google says. The company had already announced it was pulling the plug on the social network because of an earlier incident, and now says the shutdown will happen four months sooner.

Lawmakers unveiled the much-anticipated farm bill compromise Monday night, ending the months-long impasse over whether a critical piece of legislation that provides subsidies to farmers and helps needy Americans buy groceries could pass before the lame-duck session concludes at the end of the year.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Does mistletoe give you the creeps? Wish that eggnog and fruitcake had never been invented? Would life be better if you never had to wrap another present?

NPR's All Things Considered is doing a story about holiday traditions you absolutely hate and wish would just go away. Have a tradition in particular that you loathe entirely? Tell us about it.

Pages