KTEP - El Paso, Texas

ON FILM: Parkland: Inside Building 12

This edition of On Film features documentary filmmaler Charlie Minn. Minn discusses his latest work, Parkland: Inside Building 12.

Read More

Latest from KTEP

Louie Saenz speaks with three Holistic Health practitioners, Veronica Ortega, Dr. Kimberly Joshi, and Dr. William Morrissey about how diet and sugar intake can wreak havoc on your immune system causing anxiety and stress this holiday season.

In June of 2017, Jordyn Rozensky and Justin Hamel left Boston and set out on a yearlong road trip with their two cats in a VW camper van. Their goals were to listen, to learn, to photograph, and to tell those stories. 

 Their name, Tendency to Wander, reflects how they’ve followed stories, stayed longer than they anticipated, and wound up wandering to places they never imagined. After 14 months on the road, they arrived El Paso, Texas where they will continue to tell stories. 

Cutting the Wire is a masterful collaboration between photographer Bruce Berman and poets Ray Gonzalez and Lawrence Welsh. Their book offers us a way to really look at the border between Mexico and the United States. 

Holiday movies return to the Plaza Theatre presented by the El Paso Community Foundation and the Plaza Classic Film Festival.  Doug Pullen, Program Director at the El Paso Community Foundation provides the details.

J.R. HERNANDEZ / UTEP COMMUNICATIONS

On this edition of Science Studio we meet two UTEP professors, Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences, and Katja Michael, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry.  They have received $6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve treatment and develop new diagnostic tools to assess post-therapeutic outcomes for patients with Chagas disease.

More from KTEP

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Connect With Us

Latest from NPR

School shootings have taken a terrible human toll. They have also been a boon to the business of security technology.

Over the summer, Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox saw an array of items on display at an expo in Orlando, Fla. He and fellow reporter Steven Rich went on to investigate whether any of the technology being promoted and sold really helps save lives.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

On the morning of his 23rd birthday, Leonel Salas is just getting off the fireline after battling the Woolsey fire all night in Southern California.

"[We] can't get any rest while we're on the lines," he says.

He's exhausted after working for 24 hours, but relieved to be at the base camp in Camarillo where there are hot meals, sleeping pods and mobile showers.

Salas and his crew have been on the job for over a week now. When he got the call to head out to the fire he didn't even have the chance to say goodbye to his parents.

More News

NPR Politics

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: that the Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Andrew Gillum ended his bid to become the first African-American governor of Florida on Saturday, conceding the race to his Republican rival, former Rep. Ron DeSantis.

"R.J. and I wanted to take a moment to congratulate Mr. DeSantis on becoming the next governor of the great state of Florida," Gillum said in a Facebook video with his wife at his side. "This has been the journey of our lives."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2018 WABE 90.1. To see more, visit WABE 90.1.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Democrat Stacey Abrams has ended her run for governor of Georgia. From WABE in Atlanta, Jim Burress reports.

JIM BURRESS, BYLINE: During a fiery speech from her campaign headquarters, Stacey Abrams accepted the inevitable.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

More NPR Political Coverage

NPR Business News

In these days of polarized politics, there was a small sign of a coalition this week.

Voices that range — and it's quite a range — on the left from the newly-elected Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, a democratic socialist, to labor unions and local Democratic Queens leaders to The Wall Street Journal's conservative editorial page and Tucker Carlson of Fox News denounced the deal New York City and state struck with Amazon to locate one of its headquarters in the borough of Queens.

On an afternoon last September, a string of explosions suddenly hit Merrimack Valley, Mass. At least five homes were destroyed and a person was killed. More than 20 others were injured.

Federal investigators say they have now pinpointed what caused the sudden explosions on Sept. 13 — a natural gas company field engineer made a major mistake in the plans he developed for construction work that happened earlier that day, resulting in a disastrous chain reaction.

Jennie-O Turkey is recalling over 91,000 pounds of ground turkey in connection to one illness from salmonella.

The strain involved has been linked to a yearlong outbreak of 164 cases of illness, including one death, in 35 states. The USDA has said more product recalls from different companies could follow.

The first illnesses related to the strain began in November of last year, according to a CDC investigation.

We've been pulling out of a recession for so long now that a lot of people are wondering whether we're on the brink of going back in.

There's no easy way to tell, but there's an Indicator the Conference Board uses, called the Leading Economic Index. It's kind of like the dashboard on a car, with ten dials and gauges flickering away that the Conference Board economists use to tell how the economy is doing overall, and whether we're running into trouble (it is the dismal science, after all).

A big car company is going small. Ford is buying electric scooter company Spin.

Ford and Spin won't confirm the price tag, but reports put the purchase price at $100 million and an overall investment from Ford of $200 million.

More NPR Business News

NPR Arts News

We recorded the show in Orlando, Fla., this week so we've invited NBA star Aaron Gordon of the Orlando Magic to play a game called "Abracadabra!" Three questions about great magicians.

Click the audio link above to see how he does.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The "Sitcom King" is back with a series where both the situation and comedy are unexpected.

Chuck Lorre, the mind behind huge hits that include Two and a Half Men, Mike & Molly, and The Big Bang Theory, has created a series for Netflix. It's set in Hollywood, but is really about the biggest show of all: growing old.

Consider the novella. It's a tricky form. Too short, some might say, or too long, or — what is a novella, exactly? A big story? A small book? Maybe you've read Ian McEwan's declaration that the novella "lays on the writer a duty of unity and the pursuit of perfection," or Taylor Antrim's claim that it's "fiction's most open-ended and compellingly discursive form." If you have, forget it. Let's start fresh.

The new film Widows is an action-packed heist thriller — with a major twist.

Masked men break into a Chicago vault. Very quickly, it goes very wrong. Within the first few minutes of the movie, the men are dead. Their wives — now widows — are left to finish the job.

When Mo Amer was nine, he left his home in Kuwait with his mother and sister. "It was a tough time," he told Ophira Eisenberg, host of NPR's Ask Me Another at the Bell House in Brooklyn. "We fled war in Kuwait and we ended up in Houston, Texas. Which is a natural destination for refugees."

Texas is where Amer first experienced stand up comedy. "I saw stand up for the first time when I was ten at the rodeo, and I told my brother that this is what I want to do for a living," he recalled.

More NPR Arts News

School shootings have taken a terrible human toll. They have also been a boon to the business of security technology.

Over the summer, Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox saw an array of items on display at an expo in Orlando, Fla. He and fellow reporter Steven Rich went on to investigate whether any of the technology being promoted and sold really helps save lives.

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: that the Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

On the morning of his 23rd birthday, Leonel Salas is just getting off the fireline after battling the Woolsey fire all night in Southern California.

"[We] can't get any rest while we're on the lines," he says.

He's exhausted after working for 24 hours, but relieved to be at the base camp in Camarillo where there are hot meals, sleeping pods and mobile showers.

Salas and his crew have been on the job for over a week now. When he got the call to head out to the fire he didn't even have the chance to say goodbye to his parents.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Updated at 10:00 p.m. ET

President Trump visited fire-ravaged areas of California on Saturday, meeting with people affected by the wildfires. At least 76 people were killed in the Camp Fire in Northern California, and nearly 1,300 people have been reported missing, making it the most destructive and deadly wildfire in California state history.

Pages