KTEP - El Paso, Texas
VERÓNICA G. CÁRDENAS/TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

Live Call-In Program: The Reality At The Border

Monday at 6pm on KTEP — The entire nation is talking about what's happening at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now, it's time for the border to speak for itself.

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VERÓNICA G. CÁRDENAS/TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

Monday at 6pm on KTEP — The entire nation is talking about what's happening at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now, it's time for the border to speak for itself.

Host Charles Horak continues his interview with actor and Oscar nominee Sam Elliot to discuss his new film and his connections to UTEP and El Paso.

Host, Daniel Chacón interviews with Emily Jungmin Yoon about her new book, A Cruelty Special to Our Species.

Marco A. Ramirez is a Grammy award winning mastering engineer who recently opened Britania Studios in El Paso. He has the expertise it takes to provide the highest possible standard of quality to make a great record. Aside from mastering tracks at his studio, Marco is also providing workshops so that others can learn his craft. 

Fox Labyrinth is El Paso's only studio specializing in body piercing and quality jewelry. The studio was founded in October 2010 with the purpose of providing the safest and most comfortable piercing experience possible. In order to accomplish this, Fox Labyrinth has set high standards by providing the best body jewelry in the industry.

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