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With great power, comes great responsibility.

Or the chance to pull a practical joke.

Pranksters included some whimsical credits buried in the fine print of an annual White House economic report, making it seem that Peter Parker and Aunt May had joined the staff of the president's Council of Economic Advisers.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The White House says President Trump will nominate Stephen Dickson, a former executive and pilot at Delta Air Lines, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration.

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Mayor Arno Hill of Lordstown, Ohio, about the General Motors plant at the center of President Trump's latest tweetstorm.

On a drizzly day earlier this month, a gaggle of mostly Chinese protesters gathered outside a provincial Supreme Court in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. Inside the court, an extradition hearing was underway to decide whether to send Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese tech giant Huawei, to be prosecuted in the United States.

Coffee? Thank U, Next

4 hours ago

There's a price problem brewing in the coffee industry. Farmers are getting less for their coffee beans, so you'd think we'd be paying less for coffee. But coffee prices at places like Starbucks and other coffee shops have been increasing.

That pricing disconnect comes from a lot of moving parts in the industry. For example, there's an oversupply of coffee beans, and industry-wide moves towards less coffee-reliant drinks, like pumpkin spice lattes or Ariana Grande's "cloud macchiato." Today on The Indicator, how that squares for coffee drinkers.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

After years of criticism and multiple lawsuits alleging that Facebook engaged in discrimination by allowing advertisers to select which users could see their ads, the social media giant announced it will make changes to its ad platform by the end of the year.

The president of the Japanese Olympic Committee said he will step down amid allegations of corruption into the successful bid for Tokyo to host the 2020 Olympics.

Tsunekazu Takeda, 71, is a former Olympic equestrian jumper who competed at the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. He is also the chair of the International Olympic Committee's Marketing Commission.

He maintains his innocence and intends to serve out the rest of his 10th term as president, resigning in June. He'll also step down from the IOC.

What Alan Krueger Taught Us

12 hours ago

NOTE: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Princeton economics professor and former Obama adviser Alan Krueger died this past weekend at the age of 58. The cause of death was suicide. Krueger made enormous contributions to the field of economics and, more broadly, to policies that affect the lives of all Americans.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Bigger isn't necessarily better when it comes to catching, selling and eating fish.

For certain snappers, in fact, a market preference for plate-size whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish. For some wild fish populations, this is a recipe for collapse.

Getting a higher education degree — whether it's an Associate's, a Bachelor's, or something else — increases your earning potential over your life. But going to school is expensive, and Americans have more than $1.5 trillion worth of outstanding student debt. That debt isn't exclusively held by the students: people over 60 are the fastest-growing segment of student loan borrowers, as parents and grandparents are increasingly taking out loans to help their kids and grandkids go to college.

A decade ago, the U.S. government claimed that ditching paper medical charts for electronic records would make health care better, safer and cheaper.

Ten years and $36 billion later, the digital revolution has gone awry, an investigation by Kaiser Health News and Fortune magazine has found.

Veteran reporters Fred Schulte of KHN and Erika Fry of Fortune spent months digging into what has happened as a result. (You can read the cover story here.)

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

There aren't many people who can command attention at the White House, the classrooms of Princeton University, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Alan Krueger did all three.

Krueger, who served as economic adviser to former President Barack Obama, died over the weekend at age 58. The cause was suicide, according to a statement from his family, released by Princeton University where Krueger taught.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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When the Nipomo Certified Farmers' Market started in 2005, shoppers were eager to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as pastured meats and eggs, directly from farmers in central California.

But the market was small — an average of 16 vendors set up tables every Sunday — making it harder for farmers to sell enough produce to make attending worthwhile.

Two words for you: flying taxis. That's right. In the not-so-distant future, you'll open your ride-hailing app and, in addition to ground options like car, SUV, scooter or bicycle, you'll see on-demand air flight.

At least that's according to the optimists at South by Southwest, the annual tech-music-film convention in Austin, Texas.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Boeing's 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes were grounded this week. The company continues to manufacture them, but the planes are not going to airlines. And Boeing remains in limbo as the company figures out its next steps. NPR's Daniella Cheslow reports.

After the New Zealand massacre was broadcast live on Facebook, it quickly went viral on various social media platforms.

Companies including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube scrambled to take it down, but once something goes viral on social media, it's difficult to stop its spread. And that has been raising questions about live broadcasting on social media and who should have access to it.

The alleged shooter seems to have first advertised the attack on the online forum 8chan, a message board known for right-wing extremist users.

This week's news stories about corruption and cheating in the college admissions process is an eye-opening lesson in how much people value getting their children into certain schools.

Lori Loughlin, who played Aunt Becky on the TV sitcom Full House, paid $500,000 to get her two daughters into the University of Southern California. That seemed like a lot to us... and raised the question: is a slot at a top-tier university worth that kind of money?

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The Evolution Of Antitrust Laws In America

Mar 14, 2019

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Saying 'I Do' To Lab-Grown Diamonds

Mar 14, 2019

The global market for diamond jewelry is worth $80 billion dollars a year. Money is pouring into the industry, but why - when demand for diamonds isn't as sparkly as it once was?

There's a new player in the space that might change the market in the near future. It's a different kind of diamond – one grown in a lab. But man-made rocks come with some big marketing problems. Traditionally, luxury products are about scarcity – not accessibility. And, unlike other consumers, high end shoppers can be attracted to high prices.

After months of silence, the Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting against Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting.

Many air travelers are breathing a sigh of relief now that the Federal Aviation Administration has grounded all Boeing 737 Max airplanes after two of the aircraft crashed in recent months, but some airline passengers are finding their flights canceled on Thursday as a result.

Updated at 11:12 a.m. ET

A federal order grounding all 737 Max jetliners in the U.S. comes after repeated assurances from the manufacturer that the planes are safe.

A woman in California who says Johnson & Johnson baby powder caused her to develop mesothelioma was awarded $29 million by a jury Wednesday. J&J says it will appeal the judgment.

With its fastest-selling plane grounded in the U.S. and around the world, Boeing faces potential hits to its bottom line as well as to its reputation. A lengthy delay could cut Boeing's revenues by billions, some analysts say.

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