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Pien Huang

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Last January, 2021, the day after he was inaugurated, President Biden released a national strategy for beating COVID-19. The 200-page document was hailed as "encouraging" and "well-constructed" — a pandemic exit blueprint that had not been articulated by the Trump administration before it.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is not adding a testing requirement to its isolation guidelines for people infected with COVID-19 who want to end their isolation after five days.

Despite pressure from health experts who advocated for adding a testing requirement, the agency is standing by its original guidance that a negative test is not needed for people who are fever-free and whose symptoms have improved.

Those who contracted the virus can end their isolation after five days while continuing to wear a well-fitting mask for an additional five days.

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Pfizer has announced new results this morning for its pill that fights COVID-19. It's called Paxlovid. NPR's Pien Huang is here to talk about it. Good morning.

PIEN HUANG, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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A cluster of rare bacterial infections has been traced to a lavender chamomile room spray. As NPR's Pien Huang reports, nearly 4,000 bottles are now being recalled.

Updated Nov. 12, 2021

Scientists and federal health agencies debated COVID-19 boosters for weeks, and are now recommending them for all three approved vaccines, for some — but not all — Americans.

Feeling a little lost in all the details about who is currently supposed to get a booster? Take our quiz to understand what federal health officials advise in your situation, based on the current scientific evidence. Note: Some states, including California and Colorado, are now offering boosters to all adults.

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Updated October 6, 2021 at 8:25 PM ET

The White House is allocating an additional $1 billion to purchase millions of rapid at-home tests for COVID-19, in response to an ongoing national shortage of these tests. The announcement was made by White House COVID-19 response coordinator Jeffrey Zients at a briefing on Wednesday.

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Through July and August, Julie Smith watched her husband, Jeffrey, get worse and worse from COVID-19. In early July, the healthy outdoorsman, 51, had tested positive for the coronavirus. Within a week, he was admitted to the intensive care unit at a hospital near their home in the suburbs of Cincinnati.

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Health officials are preparing to roll out COVID-19 booster shots in the United States this September. According to a plan announced Wednesday, all U.S. adults who received a two-dose vaccine would be eligible for an additional jab of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine eight months from when they got their second one.

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Updated August 13, 2021 at 6:07 PM ET

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As kids return to school amidst the delta variant surge, parents can look out for certain symptoms and follow some recommended steps to keep children and their classrooms as safe as possible.

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