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Sure, the book Nudge may have become a cultural phenomenon that ended up selling millions of copies. And, OK, it resulted in hundreds of governments and countless companies around the world adopting its concepts and methods. And, yeah, its co-author Richard Thaler went on to win the Nobel Prize and appear in an Oscar-winning movie starring Brad Pitt, Christian Bale and Ryan Gosling. But, Thaler says, when he and co-author Cass Sunstein were trying to sell the book back in the mid-2000s, they had a hard time finding someone to publish it.

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Susan Curp was on a quick run to the store when her 13-year-old daughter spotted something she couldn't pass up: back-to-school sales. Notebooks covered with llamas and palm trees. Pens, pencils and even a case for the scented sanitizer — sparkly, of course.

"I think she's excited to ... get organized and just have a little more normalcy in her life," Curp says.

Curp's daughter has a twin brother who's far less into back-to-school shopping. But he, too, will have to do it — because a lot has changed during the year and a half of the coronavirus pandemic.

Coastal cities need billions of dollars to build defenses against sea level rise. Tensions are rising over where that funding will come from: taxpayers or private companies with waterfront property?

Explore the project: https://apps.npr.org/sea-level-rise-silicon-valley/

Updated July 26, 2021 at 3:24 PM ET

Miami Herald Executive Editor Monica Richardson could have discarded a racist email she received from a reader without a second thought. It was filled with offensive commentary, ended by calling her a misogynistic slur and could have been discounted as one of many unpleasant emails journalists are sent every day.

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Tobacco giant Philip Morris International says it will stop selling cigarettes in the United Kingdom within the next decade — including the company's iconic Marlboro brand.

"It will disappear," the company's CEO Jacek Olczak said in an interview with The Mail on Sunday. "The first choice for consumers is they should quit smoking. But if they don't, the second best choice is to let them switch to the better alternatives."

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A New York institution has closed after nearly 25 years. It's the Astor Place Kmart. The big-box store served as a patently uncool anchor in the East Village, one of New York City's most fashionable districts.

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When Jeff Bezos returned to Earth after a trip to the edge of space, there were sighs of relief — and it's likely some of them were from board members of the $1.8 trillion company he started 27 years ago.

For Amazon's founder and executive chairman, the trip on Tuesday aboard a rocket from his venture Blue Origin may have been the realization of a childhood dream.

What Can The IRS Do To Enforce Tax Laws?

Jul 24, 2021

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Brendan Paul has got the look. The dyed black pompadour. The bedazzled suit. The sunglasses. He's an Elvis impersonator and, on a recent Wednesday, he's guiding two young women – Jess Sandoval and Alana Stroebel – through some special vows at the Graceland wedding chapel in downtown Las Vegas.

"Jess, I want you to look Alana in the eyes and say, 'I promise to always love you tender and never leave you at the Heartbreak Hotel," Paul said, while laughing.

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OSHA has announced 59 citations and nearly $1 million in penalties after an investigation into a nitrogen leak at a poultry processing plant that killed six workers and injured at least a dozen others earlier this year.

Bob Sinner, a specialty soybean producer in North Dakota, has a major problem on his hands: He has plenty of beans, but he's struggling to ship them to his customers overseas, and his deliveries are running at least a month and a half behind schedule.

"We've had customers in Asia that have had to stop their operations waiting for supply," Sinner says. "Our farmers need to get their storage facilities emptied because we have a new crop that's coming in September, October. We have to get this product moving."

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FirstEnergy Corp. has agreed to pay a $230 million fine for its central role in a bribery scheme — the goal of which was to get legislation passed that included a $1 billion bailout for two of its power plants in Ohio.

Federal prosecutors charged FirstEnergy, based in Akron, Ohio, with conspiring to commit honest services wire fraud.

Back around the start of the year, Michael Thurmond had a problem. He's the top elected official in DeKalb County, Ga. Congress had approved about $50 billion to help people catch up and pay rent to avoid eviction.

But Thurmond worried that his county wouldn't get enough money to help everybody.

"What do I say to the family who is the first in line after all the money has run out?" he asks.

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Just as people need to find ways to cool off in the summer, so do livestock. And the past few years for farmers, it's been a struggle.

Copyright 2021 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.

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The economic recovery after the pandemic looks very different depending on what state you're in. WBUR's Anthony Brooks looks at a dramatic disparity between New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

Sarah Ramey's first book was supposed to be a very big deal. Her publishers expected The Lady's Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness to be a runaway best seller.

"We had a huge publicity slate," she says, a bit shyly. "You know, the Today show and CBS This Morning and, actually, NPR's Weekend Edition."

A revolver that killed one of the most famous wanted men in the Wild West 140 years ago is slated to be offered for millions of dollars next month.

Prior to his killing, a judge is said to have sentenced famed outlaw Billy the Kid to hang until "you are dead, dead, dead." Billy was rumored to respond, "And you can go to hell, hell, hell."

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