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Let's turn now to Russia, where there has been a spike in coronavirus infections. For the third consecutive day, Russia saw more than 10,000 new cases. NPR's Charles Maynes is in Moscow.

The U.N.'s humanitarian chief has warned that without global cooperation and financial assistance, the number of people dying from hunger or hunger-related diseases could double this year due to the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic.

"The effect of that is going to be, for the first time in probably in 30 years, a big increase in the number of people in extreme poverty, people living on less than $2 a day," said Mark Lowcock, U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

A flotilla of Saudi tankers loaded with crude oil has begun arriving on the U.S. Gulf Coast, worrying American shale producers who face uncertainty because of an oversupply of oil.

At least 18 very large crude carriers, each carrying 2 million barrels of oil, are headed to the U.S., according to Michelle Wiese Bockmann, markets editor and oil analyst for Lloyd's List, a shipping news service in London.

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In these pandemic days of fear and tedium, literature can be a comforting distraction. In Russia, young readers have rediscovered a Soviet-era poem and are finding a message from the past that resonates. NPR's Charles Maynes in Moscow explains.

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The Trump administration keeps raising the, so far, unproven theory that the coronavirus originally escaped from a Chinese lab in the city of Wuhan. Here's Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaking Sunday on ABC's "This Week."

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Today in Italy, the lockdown is letting up after eight weeks of restrictions. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports that Italians are emerging from their homes cautiously, discovering a new and unfamiliar world.

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The NFL announced on Monday that it has moved the 2020 season's international games back to the U.S.

One game scheduled to take place in Mexico City, and four games slated for London, will instead take place in the U.S. due to the coronavirus, according to a statement from the NFL.

The Bangladeshi government has quarantined 28 Rohingya Muslims on a cyclone- and flood-prone island in the Bay of Bengal, citing fears of exposing residents of the country's sprawling refugee camps to COVID-19.

Officials say the group — mostly women and children — had been stranded at sea for weeks, reportedly trying to get to Malaysia.

About 4.5 million Italians are returning to work Monday as Italy — one of the countries hardest hit by COVID-19 — begins lifting some restrictions meant to stop the spread of the disease.

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Syria's president Bashar al-Assad appears to be keeping a promise that he made to retake every inch of the country with brutal force. People in the areas he controls are suffering economically as well. Here's NPR's Alice Fordham.

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Israel's top court is deciding whether corruption charges should bar Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu from forming a government.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson opened up about his nearly two-week-long battle with coronavirus on Sunday, revealing that at points during his ICU stay doctors were making arrangements for "what to do if things went badly wrong."

"It was a tough old moment, I won't deny it," the 55-year-old said in an interview with British newspaper The Sun. "They had a strategy to deal with a 'death of Stalin-type' scenario."

Johnson spent three nights in the ICU at St Thomas' Hospital in London, where he said medical workers gave him "liters and liters of oxygen."

Federico Manni first noticed something was wrong with his family's olive trees about six years ago.

It was summer, the cicadas were singing, and Manni and his father, Enzo, were weaving through their olive groves in Puglia, the southern region forming the "heel" of Italy's boot.

They noticed some trees looked burnt.

"Dead branches, brown leaves," Manni says. "Terrible, really terrible."

They pruned and washed the trees but it didn't help. Soon more trees shriveled. Today nearly all are dead.

North and South Korean forces briefly traded gunfire along the country's heavily-patrolled border on Sunday morning, according to the South's military.

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Tomorrow, Italy begins lifting the lockdown it imposed two months ago to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Despite some of the strictest measures in Europe, Italy's death toll continued to climb. Now it's more than 28,000, second only to the United States.

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With restaurants closed in Belgium until at least June 8 due to the country's COVID-19 lockdown, piles of potatoes that would have been deep-fried and topped with a glop of mayo have nowhere to go.

Some 750,000 tons of spuds intended for the free market that remain unsold — and those under contract but unable to be processed due to the glut — will only remain edible until the end of June. Meanwhile, the price for such potatoes has plummeted.

He describes it as a "leaf blower with a parachute overhead."

Strap in, and "your body becomes the fuselage" — and you are the pilot. Your knees dangle into open air.

For 15 years, the contraption, called a motorized paraglider, has taken photographer George Steinmetz across 25 different countries. From airport to airport, Steinmetz carried his personal aircraft, which could be disassembled and stashed in three bags, each weighing about 50 pounds, that he would proceed to check in.

Jeff Conroy-Krutz is associate professor of political science at Michigan State University. He studies African media, focusing on how media affect electoral competition, ethnic and partisan polarization, and political engagement. He has conducted research in Central, East and West Africa and is editor of the Afrobarometer Working Papers Series.

Migrant advocates say more testing must be done in the U.S. and Mexico before deportees are sent back to their home countries.

At least 100 Guatemalans infected with the coronavirus were deported from the U.S. from mid-March through mid-April.

The U.S. suspended deportation flights to Guatemala after 44 migrants tested positive on a flight on April 13.

After waiting out a seven-week coronavirus lockdown and some of the strictest social distancing measures in Western Europe, adults in Spain are being allowed out to play at last.

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a ban on all assault-style firearms Friday.

The ban includes "1,500 models and variants," including the popular AR-15 rifle. It will prohibit those firearms, as well as some components, from being used, sold or imported.

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