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SCIENCE STUDIO - Dr. David Strubbe

Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. David Strubbe of the University of California at Merced for a compelling dicussion on solar cells & nuclear fusion. His interests vary from theoretical condensed-matter physics to thermoelectrics.

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Host Louie Saenz sits down with Dr. Irasema Coronado a professor in the Department of Political Science at UTEP. She is co-author of the book titled “Fronteras No Mas: Toward Social Justice at the U.S.-Mexico Border” and several academic articles to discuss the current state of immugration.

Host Louie Saenz sits down with Peter D. Johnston, a negotiator, advisor, mediator and speaker whose expertise is sought worldwide.He is also the author of Weapons of Peace.

Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. David Strubbe of the University of California at Merced for a compelling dicussion on solar cells & nuclear fusion. His interests  vary from theoretical condensed-matter physics to thermoelectrics.  

Host, Daniel Chacón interviews with Gary Lachman about his book, Dark Star Rising: Magick and Power in the Age of Trump. This is part one of a two part interview.

Elaine Molinar is a partner and Managing Director of Snøhetta - The Americas, the firm chosen to design the El Paso Children's Museum.  

 Snøhetta is an interdisciplinary design studio which takes an integrative approach to architecture, landscape, and interior architecture. Here to talk design and our upcoming children's museum is Elaine Molinar.

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Editor's note: This story contains descriptions and photos of human remains that some readers may find disturbing.

Border Patrol agents steer their all-terrain buggy through dense brush on the historic King Ranch. They're looking for a human skeleton.

They spotted bones earlier in the day when they were chasing a group of migrants through this pasture, and they marked the GPS coordinates. Now they're returning with a sheriff's deputy.

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New documents out tonight provide new details about what Michael Cohen, the president's former attorney, told Congress behind closed doors this March. Cohen already admitted publicly that he misled Congress about the timing of a Trump Tower project in Moscow. He is currently in federal prison serving a three-year sentence. Tonight's revelations have to do with who Cohen says told him to lie and why.

NPR's Tim Mak joins us now from Capitol Hill with details. Hey, Tim.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

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The surprise announcement started this way.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS)

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Chicago's mayors usually rise from the ranks of political insiders - not anymore.

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LORI LIGHTFOOT: As I stand here today, I can't help but think about where I came from.

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NPR Politics

It's decision season at the Supreme Court, and there are a host of consequential cases the justices are deciding, from a controversial Trump administration proposal to adding a citizenship question to the Census to gerrymandering and a question of separation of church and state.

As is always the case, timing of which exact cases will be decided is unknown until the court releases them. The only clues are when the cases were argued, and, sometimes, that's not predictive either.

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President Trump's former White House counsel was supposed to testify before Congress tomorrow. A House panel had asked him to address the president's efforts to shut down special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

Updated at 7:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge ruled against President Trump on Monday in a subpoena dispute not long after the White House said it is seeking to block its former top lawyer from talking to Congress.

The events amounted to a win — and a loss — apiece for Republicans and Democrats in their ongoing high-stakes legal and political war over separation of powers and oversight in the aftermath of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

The McGahn matter

A Conversation With Senator Tom Cotton

13 hours ago

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton wrote a book.

But he’s not running for president (as far as we know.)

Politico describes the book as “apolitical,” and it follows the U.S. 3rd Infantry Regiment, a unit which Cotton was a platoon leader in 2007-2008. That regiment is called the Old Guard, which carries out funerals for soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

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NPR Business News

Anonymous hackers breached the city of Baltimore's servers two weeks ago. Since then, those servers' digital content has been locked away — and the online aspects of running the city are at an impasse.

Government emails are down, payments to city departments can't be made online and real estate transactions can't be processed.

When Courtney Hering started working at Kohler Co. seven years ago, she was continuing a long family tradition.

"My mother, she's been here 39 years," she says. "My dad worked here for 14 years. And my grandfather on my dad's side, he worked here as well."

Heads are rolling in the corner office.

For decades, the main reason chief executives were ousted from their jobs was the firm's financial performance. In 2018, that all changed. Misconduct and ethical lapses occurring in the #MeToo era are now the biggest driver behind a chief executive falling from the top.

That's according to a new study from the consulting division of PwC, one the nation's largest auditing firms.

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A telecom merger that has been years in the making is poised to clear a major regulatory hurdle.

Ajit Pai, the Federal Communications Commission chairman, said Monday that he endorses the merger of T-Mobile and Sprint, a $26 billion deal. This came after the companies agreed to various concessions, including a pledge to not raise prices for three years.

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NPR Arts News

Is it weird to keep asserting that Summer Movie Season starts Memorial Day weekend, when Avengers: Endgame, the ultimate summer movie, and also the year's (the decade's! the century's!) biggest blockbuster, opened last month?

Maybe. Sure. Who cares?

"Summer movie" is a term, after all, that has taken on a negative connotation, as it tends to be deployed by those looking to sniffily dismiss the whole crop of films that come out in the months without an R. See also: "popcorn movies," "comic-book movies."

Seven years after her death, Whitney Houston may be coming to a venue near you.

The pop icon's estate has partnered with BASE Hologram to produce "An Evening With Whitney: The Whitney Houston Hologram Tour," the company revealed in a statement on Monday.

The announcement comes on the heels of a separate deal between the singer's estate and Primary Wave Publishing last week, which is also expected to produce a series of new projects, including a new album, a possible Broadway musical and Vegas-style spectacle.

Cult filmmaker and self-described "filth elder" John Waters, 73, has plenty of ideas about what older people should and shouldn't do.

The worst thing, he says, is to get a convertible: "Because believe me, old age and windswept do not go hand in hand. It's really a bad look! You can't be trying too hard to rebel [when] you're older."

This month in Romancelandia, love goes global in three novels that feature royals and regular boys and girls getting their happy ever afters. Because no matter where you come from or who you fall in love with, true love is possible if you open your heart and risk it all.

We've recapped the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones. Spoilers, of course, abound.

I mean ... sure?

I am prepared to die on the ashy hill of They Didn't Lay The Necessary Track To Justify Daenerys' Heel-Turn, but that whole contretemps seems soooo last week. I've made my peace with it and am prepared to dissect the show that they made, not the one we expected/wanted them to.

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Is The New iPhone Worth The Upgrade?

Sep 13, 2012

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And now about that new iPhone. Techies have long been speculating about what the device will look like and what it will do. Guessing right along with everybody else was Mario Armstrong. He's a digital lifestyle expert and a frequent guest on this program.

Mario...

Update at 12:31 p.m. ET. Federal Reserve Announces QE3:

The Federal Reserve announced it would spend $40 billion a month on bond purchases in an effort to stimulate the economy and drive the the unemployment rate down.

The Wall Street Journal says that unlike the first two rounds of Quantitative Easing, this time the Fed will focus solely on buying mortgage-backed securities.

To protect children against whooping cough, doctors recommend five shots of vaccine before they turn 7.

But what happens after that? How long does the protection last?

The past 24 hours have produced a few answers — but many more questions — about the anti-Islam film that became a flashpoint across North Africa and the Middle East this week.

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports on Morning Edition that The Innocence of Muslims was shot in Los Angeles County last August, under the title Desert Warriors. It's full of "choppy dialogue, bad acting and scenes of a buffoonish Muhammad," she says.

Hanna Rosin's pop sociology work The End of Men, based on her cover story in The Atlantic magazine, is a frustrating blend of genuine insight and breezy, unconvincing anecdotalism. She begins with a much-discussed statistic: three-quarters of the 7.5 million jobs lost in our current recession were once held by men.

UPDATE: 11:37 a.m. As expected, the New York Board of Health passed a rule banning sugary drinks like soda in sizes 16 oz. or larger at restaurants, concession stands and other eateries in an effort to combat obesity today. The ban is expected to take effect in March, but according to the Wall Street Journal, opponents are already considering a legal challenge to prevent that. It passed 8-0.

Update 8:21 ET. Two Slain Americans Identified:

Two of the security personnel who were killed Tuesday along with Ambassador Chris Stevens and Information Management Officer Sean Smith have been identified. They are Tyrone S. Woods and Glen A. Doherty, both security personnel who died helping protect their colleagues. Both men were former Navy SEALs, according to a statement from U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Here's more from the statement:

'Lose Her' Finds Power In Resonant Voices

Sep 13, 2012

Great fiction is built around characters that follow the fruitless and wrongheaded paths they're offered, which is how readers savor safe passage into someone else's impetuosity. Yunior, who first appeared in Junot Diaz's debut collection, Drown, is the narrator in several of the stories in the Pulitzer Prize–winning author's third book, This Is How You Lose Her. Yunior is now middle-aged, middle-class, a self-described sucio struggling to mature into adulthood and not succeeding particularly well.

New In Paperback Sept. 10-16

Sep 13, 2012

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Mat Johnson, Hector Tobar, Ayad Akhtar, Mike Birbiglia and Steven Brill.

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