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STATE OF THE ARTS: Chalk the Block

It’s almost time for Chalk the Block , the largest public arts festival in the southwest. The event is free and will feature over 200 artists. This year, special installations include Impulse, a publicly activated light and sound experience; Intrude, a large installation of blow up animals; Paradox Pyramid, an interactive abstract pyramid installation and much more.

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The El Paso International Music Foundation was formed to is to empower El Paso/Juarez/Las Cruces musicians and promote the local music scene. They do this through education, advocacy and building awareness. 

It’s almost time for Chalk the Block, the largest public arts festival in the southwest. The event is free and will feature over 200 artists.

This year, special installations include  Impulse, a publicly activated light and sound experience; Intrude, a large installation of blow up animals; Paradox Pyramid, an interactive abstract pyramid installation and much more. 

On this edition of Good to Grow, hosts Denise Rodriguez, John  White, and Jan Petrzelka discuss growing herbs in the fall in the desert southwest.

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Light And Dark, Characters Shine In 'Blanca & Roja'

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Sisters Blanca and Roja del Cisne have always known that one of them is doomed to become a swan. It's been this way for generations and generations of their family — there is always a "good" sister who will live out her human life, and the other, darker sister, who will fly away, never to see her family again. The strange and magical nature of their family keeps them apart from the rest of the town where they live, and it's so difficult for them to assimilate that their parents eventually take them out of high school.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 Iowa Public Radio News. To see more, visit Iowa Public Radio News.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 West Virginia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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